Arkansas Rivers List



DISCLAIMER: READ ALL OF THE FOLLOWING DISCLAIMER BEFORE USING THE INFORMATION PRESENTED IN THIS DOCUMENT! YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR OWN INTERPRETATION AND USE OF ANY INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT. THE INFORMATION PRESENTED HERE IS IN NO WAY GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATE OR UP-TO-DATE. YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR OWN SAFETY WHEN YOU BOAT THESE OR ANY OTHER CREEKS. YOU SHOULD OBTAIN PROPER TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO RUN ANY WHITEWATER RIVER OR CREEK.


INTRODUCTION AND RATING INFORMATION


This document contains information on the whitewater rivers and creeks of Arkansas. The information is NOT guaranteed to be completely accurate or up-to-date. Rapids, hazards, and access status may change quickly for many of these creeks. All ratings and descriptions are solely the opinion of the author, and the reader assumes all responsibility for his or her own interpretation of the material presented here. When you choose to paddle any creek, you do so at your own risk! Don't substitute these ratings and descriptions for scouting and good judgement. To help put the ratings in perspective here are some sample ratings of rivers in other parts of the country that I have done:
Nantahala R. (NC) = II-III Chattooga R. (GA) Sect III @ 2.5 ft. = II-IV Ocoee R. (TN) @ 1200 cfs = III Tellico R. (Ledges) (TN) @ 500 cfs = III-IV Crystal Narrows (CO) @ 1200 cfs = IV Pine Cr. and Numbers, Arkansas R. (CO) @ 1200 cfs = III-IV (V) Chattooga R. Sect IV @ 2.5 ft. (high) = III-V Upper Gauley R. @ 2800 cfs = III-V Cascades of the Nantahala @ optimal flows = III-IV+ Russell Fork (KY) @ 800 cfs = IV-V
These may seem a bit low to you if you're a beginner, or they may seem a bit high to you if you're a seasoned expert. And, of course, some of these runs, such as creek runs like the Cascades and Tellico, compare better with Ozark streams than bigger river runs like the Chattooga and Gauley. Just remember that a class III rating in this document generally means that you can expect a lot of solid class III action. If the rating is class IV or V there will be oppourtinites for serious injury or even death for an out of control paddler. The Index by Difficulty section (below) provides a fairly good comparison of the overall difficulty of the creeks. Creeks of equal or very similar difficulty have been listed in alphabetical order. Also notice that some creeks that have similar ratings have very different hazards (Cossatot R. and Fall Cr. for instance). On the lower end of the scale, don't assume that just because you have successfully run the Big Piney and Hurricane creeks, you are ready to tackle creeks such as Spirits Cr. and Kings R. The gap between class II to II+ and class III to III+ is a big one. Take time to hone your skills on the runs you are comfortable with before moving on to the next level. Above the class III level, the creeks become very tight and technical, and very fast paced (with Richland Cr. being a relatively big, medium volume entry in the class IV category). The margin for error on these creeks is often very small, and the penalties for mistakes can be very high. Runs at the top of the scale such as Whistlepost Cr., Beech Cr., Shop Cr., Sulphur Cr., and Possum Walk Cr. represent the limit of navigable water in the Ozarks. These runs have already produced injuries, accidents and several near misses, despite only having been run a few times each. Even boaters who routinely run these types of creeks put themselves at great risk when attempting these runs. Please don't try to establish your reputation by running these dangerous steep creeks. These runs can put a permanent end to your whitewater career.
The rapidly changing water levels on many of the Ozark creeks can greatly influence the difficulty and danger of a run. On many of the small, steep creeks, an optimal run is had at less than 300 cfs. A little more water can turn a fun class III run into a class V death trap. Many creeks are also choked with fallen trees and willow strainers. These hazards are unpredictable, and they can form overnight. A badly placed strainer can turn a class II rapid into a portage-or-die situation. Higher water levels increase the current's speed and force and make strainers a much greater hazard. Be aware of the dangers of flood stage paddling, and don't hesitate to opt for a safer run or no run at all when the water is high.
Many of the rivers and creeks described in this document (as well as many others) can be found in Tom Kennon's excellent guidebook Ozark Whitewater (Menasha Ridge Press). This is a great resource for Ozark paddlers of all levels, and no paddler should be without it.
This list is devoted primarily to the more challenging Ozark whitewater streams. A good source of information on less difficult whitewater rivers can be found in the Arkansas Floaters Kit Page maintained by the Arkansas Parks and Tourism Department. Another good source is the GORP Arkansas Rivers Page at http://www.gorp.com/gorp/resource/Us_river/ar.htm

LOCATING CREEKS

This document is divided into North and South Arkansas. The dividing line between north and south is I-40, and most directions are relative to I-40. When trying to locate put-ins and take-outs, USGS topographic quads (now available in digital format from Delorme) and a book called "The Arkansas Atlas and Gazetteer" may come in handy. Also, a book named "The Roads of Arkansas" provides good non-topographic map coverage for the entire state. One final note concerning put-ins and take-outs. Many creeks in the Ozarks are located on privately owned lands. Most landowners are very reasonable about using their land for putting in or taking out as long as you follow some simple guidelines: 1) Always get permission BEFORE accessing a creek on private land. Failure to do this will certainly irritate even the most friendly landowners, and it will often result in the landowner denying access to everyone! If you can't find out who owns the land, find another creek to run, and come back for that one after you contact the owner. The long-term gain of avoiding trouble with the owner will far outweigh any short-term thrills. Also, be aware that anyone caught trespassing in Arkansas may face stiff fines, jail time, or, worse, the end of a shotgun barrel. 2) Always treat the land with great respect. This applies to public as well as private lands. Don't litter, cut down trees, cut fences, or deface any property. Try to leave the land and the creek in better shape than you found it. 3) Always treat the landowner with respect. Don't argue with an irate landowner. Try to calmly and politely explain your side, but respect his (or her) side as well. After all, he does own the land, and you are essentially in his backyard. 4) Respect the landowner's privacy. Don't use obscene language, don't behave in an offensive way, and don't STRIP DOWN NAKED in view of a landowner or their house. You'd be surprised how much these actions can piss off someone who has small children. 5) If a landowner denies you access to his land, please let other paddlers know about it. Spreading the word helps to ensure that there won't be more trespassers who might aggravate the situation further.

LIST FORMAT

The general format of each creek listing is as follows:
NAME of the creek or river Rating: classification (I to VI) for the entire run (A rating in parentheses such as III-IV (VI) indicates that there is one rapid or section that is not characteristic of the overall run.) (A "*" indicates that rating is an estimate or that the author has not run the section in question.) TDCR Rating: Rating (0 to 9) of four different factors. These ratings should be used for comparison purposes only! 1) Technical Difficulty: how hard is it to run good lines (avoiding major hazards)? 0 = easy, 9 = very hard 2) Danger Level: if you screw up (see #1 for how easy it is to screw up) how high a price will you pay? 0 = very little risk, 9 = high risk of injury or death 3) Continuity of Rapids: how fast/continuous are the rapids? 0 = long pools, short rapids, 9 = almost no pools or eddies. 4) Remoteness: if you screw up (#1) and get hurt (#2), how far away is help? 0 = road right beside river, 9 = 3 day hike to somewhere that a helicopter can land. The rating is given as a four digit number like this: 6431. This would indicate that a river is technically a 6, danger level is 4, continuity is 3, and remoteness is 1. These ratings are based on opinions collected from people who have actually paddled the rivers in question. Some runs are not rated because I couldn't get an opinion on them. Warning: This system may not correspond to the international system (I - VI). Location: Counties and put-in and take-out locations (when available) NOTE: Please read the section on
Creek Access before trying to access any creek. Topo Quad(s): USGS topographic 7.5 minute (1:24000) series maps Gradient: average in feet per mile Length: length of the run in miles Season: ALL = all year round, FALL = Fall, SPRING = Spring, RAIN = only after local rains, FLOOD = only after local flood NOTE: If a run is of type RAIN, you may be able to catch it one to three days after a heavy rain. If a run is of type FLOOD, you probably need to be there within hours of a heavy rain. FLOOD runs are not easy to catch, unless you live very near them, so don't drive in from out-of-state expecting these to be running, even during periods of wet weather. Our season in Arkansas is generally from October to May with the best months being March to mid May. Gauge: as much gauging info as is available Hazards: rapids, strainers, and landowners that can threaten life and limb Description: A short description of the run.



Alphabetic Index:



Index by Difficulty:

NOTE: This list is meant to be a rough guide to the relative difficulty of the streams. Each run has it's own mix of hazards and gradient, and the character of a run cannot adequately be summed up by a few roman numerals. So, don't rely on ratings or this list! Read the information on the creek, try to talk to others who have run the creek, hike down the creek to check it out before you run it, or do all of the above before you commit yourself to running any of the harder creeks on the list. Also, this list certainly doesn't indicate what the "hardest" or "best" runs are. Once the creeks get above the class III level THEY ARE ALL technical and dangerous and the primary factors deciding which one is the "most" difficult are water volume and the number and placement of tree strainers. These factors will be different each time the creeks are run.

The creeks are divided into five categories. Within each category they are listed in alphabetical order. The categories are somewhat subjective, but they are an attempt to match paddler skill level to the creeks in question. Here is a very rough idea of what each category means:

	1) Beginner: Has paddled less than five times on whitewater.  Has no 
		real paddling skills.  Comfortable only on class I and easy 
		class II.
	2) Novice: Has paddled several class II runs.  Has some boat control
		skill, but unreliable self rescue skill.  Confident on class II
		water and may run some class III.
	3) Intermediate: Has experience on many class II-III runs.  Has
		good boat control in rapids, and has self rescue skills
		(at least a pool roll).  Comfortable with most class III 
		rapids and may run some class IV.
	4) Advanced: Has experience on many class III-IV runs.  Has
		excellent boat control in class III+ (including eddying and
		ferrying), and solid self rescue skills (rolls in whitewater).
		Confident in class III-IV water, and may run class V.  Can
		lead continuous class III.
	5) Expert: Has years of experience on class III-V runs.  Has
		excellent boat control even in very heavy water.  Has
		bombproof self rescue skill, and can organize and exectute
		rescue of others.  Confident in class IV-V water, and can
		lead continuous class III-IV.
Of course, paddlers, like creeks, are not easy to lump into a finite number of categories. But this should provide you with a rough idea of what creeks you should be looking at.

Category 1: Beginner

Category 2: Novice

Category 3: Intermediate

Category 4: Advanced

Category 5: Expert




North Arkansas

Adkins Cr.

	Rating: III-V
	TDCR: 7878
	Location: Newton Co.; The put-in is reached by taking Dixon Ridge Rd.
		west off of Hwy 21 about 1.5 miles north of Fallsville.  This
		road is the same as the put-in road for the popular Hailstone
		Cr. run.  About 2.5 miles down this road, just before it
		starts to really drop in elevation down to the Hailstone,
		there is a small road turning to the right in the middle of
		a switchback.  This road leads to the Dahl Memorial wilderness
		access.  You should see a USFS sign-in board located near a
		parking turnout.  Park here and brushwhack southeast about 1/2
		mile to the creek.  You're aiming for approx. elevation 1820
		feet, where two major tributaries merge.  The take-out is at
		the Hwy. 21 bridge over the Buffalo R., the standard Hailstone
		take-out.  In an emergency (such as not having time to
		paddle out on the Hailstone), you can pull out at the confluence
		with the Hailstone and brushwhack up 500 vertical feet to
		a small road that will take you back to the put-in.  This
		is not a fun thing to do, but if you have to do it, start at the
		confluence on the left side of Adkins and try to follow the
		spine of the ridge up to the southwest.  Always keep climbing
		because the point you're trying to reach is at the very top
		(elevation 2087 on the USGS Fallsville quad).  The foundation 
		of an old homestead marks the end of the road which leads off 
		to the southwest and eventually ends up at the Dahl Memorial.  
		It's best to take along a good topo map and compass.  Good luck.
	Topo Quad(s): Fallsville, Boxley
	Gradient: 150 fpm (2nd mile at 190 fpm)
	Length: 15 mi. (2 miles on Adkins plus 13 miles on Hailstone Cr.)
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Several feet of water over the low water bridge over the Buffalo R.
                at Ponca is probably a good indicator.  Smith Cr. should also
                look very big and muddy at Hwy. 21.  Like Smith Cr., putting
                on shortly after very heavy rainfall is a must for catching
                the creek at a good level.  Dragging down to the put-in
                when it's too low can be a nightmare.  You may be able to 
                predict the levels using the Buffalo R. rain gauges which are 
                linked below.  The Ponca and Buffalo Tower gauges are the ones
                to watch.
                LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)
	Hazards: strainers, severely undercut rocks, severe rapids, hydraulics, 
                etc.
	Description: Overlooked and ignored for many years, Adkins Cr. was first
		paddled on June 17, 2000 by Dave "Ghost" Reid, Steve "Dog" 
		Robertson, and Bill "Fish" Herring.  Like many Newton Co. creek
		runs, a run down Adkins creek can't be adequately summed up 
		in print.  It compares in difficulty to classics like Beech Cr. 
		and Shop Cr., but like those has a personality all it's own.  
		Probably the best way to get an appreciation for the creek is
		to hike it from the put-in to the Buffalo and back up.  The
		hike is spectacular and will give you a chance to inspect 
		the big rocks that form the myriad drops in the creek.  When
		big rains fall, the creek becomes runnable where two smaller
		creeks merge southeast of the Dahl Memorial.  Immediately the
		paddler is faced with three blind ledges.  This is "Gimme Three
		Steps", and it is a great start to the day if you avoid getting
		surfed in the holes at the bottom of the drops.  After some
		tree dodging you'll come around a corner and onto a sliding
		shelf of rock.  Get out quickly to scout "The Last Step".  This
		big drop is walled in by an undercut grotto, and at moderate to
		high levels the water below kicks underneath the river right
		wall making for a class V drop.  It was not run on the 
		firost descent, but it may look more user friendly at lower or
		higher water levels.  Until the hydraulic is probed, it should
		be treated as a keeper.  Portage is easiest on the right side.
		A big slide into a hole follows Last Step, and after this the
		creek changes to blind, undercut boulder piles for the next 
		1.75 miles. The first of these, "Undercut #1" will give you an 
		idea of what is going to come at you over and over again for the 
		rest for the trip.  There are two particulary nasty spots to 
		watch out for. One of these is "Ghost's Hole" about 1/8 mile 
		below Last Step. After dropping over a few ledges the creek 
		runs underneath an undercut bluff on the left.  A pour on the 
		right can be run, but a mistake may still put you under the wall.  
		The only good portage option is on the right.  The second major 
		hazard is another nasty undercut trap located maybe 1/4 mile 
		from the end of the gorge.  "Dead Man's Leap" looks just like
		many of the other ledge/boulder drops from the top, but all
		of the water pours off of the ledge and under a big rock.  The
		creek is walled in by bluffs and portages are tricky.  Although
		these are the only drops I'll single out, at moderately high
		levels almost every drop is potentially dangerous.  Frequent 
		bank scouting is a must, and moves in front of undercuts are 
		a fact of life.  The average drop involves running a class III+ 
		line to miss class V hazards. For the experienced creeker it 
		is Nirvana.  For anyone not familiar with this type of water 
		it will not be pleasant.  Once you emerge at the confluence
		with the Hailstone, you have two options.  The best one is to
		paddle out, but the Hailstone will be at or near flood, and it
		is a continuous, hairy, big-water run at these levels.  Huge 
		keeper holes and pourovers must be carefully avoided.  If you 
		have the time to make it before dark, you can paddle to Hwy. 21 in
		around 2.5 to 3 hours.  If not, take-out option #2 is a 500 
		vertical foot climb back up to a small road that follows the top 
		of the ridge for two miles back to the Dahl Memorial.  This is 
		only a last resort, but it may be less dangerous than trying to 
		boat flooded rapids in the dark.  Adkins is an incredible 
		wilderness creek run combined with a long, floodstage run-out on 
		the Hailstone.  Trips can quickly become epic and aborting a trip
		anywhere in the gorge is about the least fun thing I can think 
		of.  Make sure you're comfortable running this type of steep
		creek before you commit yourself to this awesome Ozark gorge.		

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Archey Cr. (A.K.A. Archey's Fork of Little Red)

	Rating: II+
	TDCR: ????
	Location:  Pope and Van Buren Co.;  Take Hwy. 16 west from Clinton
		and then Hwy. 264 north to the bridge over the creek.  Put
		in at this bridge.  Take out at the Hwy. 65 bridge in Clinton.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Alread, Botkinburg, Old Lexington, Clinton
	Gradient: ??? fpm
	Length: 20 mi
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: none.  The Big Piney gauge is a reasonable estimate.  The
		Piney should be between 4 and 7 feet for a good run.
	Hazards: numerous strainers
	Description: This is a long but fun run, and it makes a good overnight
		trip, if you secure permission for camping on private land.
		Other put-ins are possible, but be sure you get permission
		to cross private lands to get to the river.  The run has
		many class II+ rapids, and the whitewater is fairly 
		continuous much of the way.  Willow strainers can be
		a major hazard, however, so stay on your toes.  This is
		a good run for paddlers comfortable on class II-III water. 

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Bear Creek (Middle Big Piney Tributary)

	Rating: III-V *
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Go 4 miles West on Hwy 123 from Pelsor (Sand Gap) and take
		Forest Service Road 1802 South at Bertha. The road runs the
		ridge on the West Side of Indian Creek. Drive about 1.3
		miles and look for a deer camp on the left. Park at the
		camp and carry down the trail directly across the road. The
		trail immediately passes by a small pond. Follow the trail
		North to the end of the knob and follow the trail 3/4 down
		the mountain. The trail continues North and crosses a small
		creek. Bushwhack to the left on the North side of the creek
		to the main creek. This is where the 3 upper forks come
		together at the beginning of a long slide. (Elevation 1490)
		Reach the take-out by going East from the Hwy 123 bridge
		over the Piney for 1/4 mile. The Hwy crosses over Sugar
		Creek in a right hand turn then curves left up the hill.
		Look for the first road to the left (South). Another deer
		camp is located here. A 4WD trail leads 1/4 mile to the
		creek just above the confluence with the Big Piney.
		(Elevation 720) 
	Topo Quad(s): Fort Douglas
	Gradient: 185 fpm
	Length: 4 mi
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Gage at Richland Campground should to be above 6 or headed
		that way. Look for 1.5" or more rain at the Deer and Ben
		Hur rain gages, at the BNR Data Page. Rain must have fallen
		within the last 6 to 12 hours. If the Sugar Creek just East
		of the Hwy 123 bridge over the Piney is flowing good, it's
		a definite run! 
	Hazards:  Undercut ledges and rocks, overhanging branches,
		strainers, waterfalls. Very tight in places (pinning
		hazards). Don't broach in "Mama Bear Falls" and beware of
		"Papa Bear Falls". The "Bear Trap" is a nasty undercut 3/4
		of the way down the creek after section of class II water.
		The first 1.25 miles drops at 300 ft/mile. 
	Description: First known descent was December 12, 1999 by Lance Jones,
		Cowper Chadbourn, Greg Churan, Shelby Johnson, Mitchell
		Ford, Graham Henry and Jeff Riley. The creek starts out fast
		and narrow with a 50-60 yard long stair stepping slide
		ending in a steep funnel dropping 10-12 feet. The creek is
		very narrow as is starts to cut into the gorge, several
		long slides and boulder fields are encountered in the
		first 1/2 miles. At this point be on the lookout for a
		small creek crashing in on the left. Immediately below the
		confluence is the "Bear Pin". A cluttered approach makes
		the left side boof difficult. A vertical pin is very
		likely with a missed boof. A few hundred yards downstream
		the creek turns 90 degrees to the left as a small
		tributary enters on the right. Get out on the river left
		and portage the inside of the corner around the multiple
		logjams. This is the end of the warm-up. The creek drops
		200 feet in the next 2/3 mile! Maximum gradient tops out
		over 550 ft/mile in this section. After a couple of nice
		drops the creek sweeps to the right and cuts back to the
		left around a steep right bank. Eddy out and scout the
		next boulder jumble, "Bear Claw". There are multiple
		routes through the jumble and pinning is very possible.
		Low water runs through here are tight and bumpy. Only a
		couple smaller drops separate the end of "Bear Claw" and
		the entrance slide to "Baby Bear Falls". This is a very
		clean and very beautiful 15+ drop. A gentle slide
		transitions into a 45 degree slope then empties into a
		fantastic grotto pool over a 8-10 ft waterfall. Enjoy the
		view and be ready to scout the next big drop less than 100
		yards downstream. "Mama Bear Falls" starts with a 20 yard
		gentle slide 20 feet wide then drops 15+ feet at a very
		steep angle as it funnels into a 4 foot wide notch. After
		leaving the notch the water fans out over bedrock as it
		pushes toward the left overhanging wall. Eddy out above
		the next horizon line. Scout and/or portage on the left
		for the big boy, "Papa Bear Falls". The creek splits into
		two narrow slots around a large boulder in the middle of
		the 15-foot wide creek. The water drops 12+ feet from each
		slot into a 8-10 ft wide cauldron. The exit from the
		cauldron is through a 3-5 ft wide 15 ft deep sluice that
		is 50-60 feet long and makes a jog to the left in the
		middle. The sluice looked nasty at the low water level, a
		flip or pin in there will be disastrous. The water exits
		the sluice over a 10 foot drop out of a wall into another
		picture perfect grotto pool. This was the only drop not
		run on the first descent. This is truly a unique drop. The
		creek calms down a little for half-mile before entering a
		mini gorge recognized by the return of large boulders to
		the creek. Pick you way through the slots. The creek
		returns to calm fast class II, but don't get lulled just
		yet. A small tributary will enter on the left as the creek
		takes a hard right turn. Again boulders reappear in the
		creek. After a slot to the left cuts back to the right
		along a steep shale bank, look for a very large boulder on
		the left followed by another very large on the right bank.
		Cut to the left immediately behind the first boulder and
		scrape down the boat-wide channel. The main channel stays
		to the right toward and UNDER the second Boulder. It is
		very difficult to recognize until you are right on it or
		know it is there. This one is apply named "Bear Trap".
		Fast class II water takes you the last mile to just above
		the confluence with the Piney. Look for the 4WD trail on
		the right just as a field comes into view. Like other
		micro-volume creeks, meaningful ratings are difficult to
		establish on the accepted International scale. At lower
		levels, the creek will seem like a very technical Class
		III, with much rock bashing, scraping, and some portages.
		At higher levels, several rapids are expected to become
		solid Class V.  A tip o' the hat to Lance Jones for a
		write-up of this great Ozark steepie!
		See Lance Jones' Pages for more info on Bear Cr.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Beech Cr.

	Rating: III-V
	TDCR: 8888
	Location: Newton Co.; Put in is off of Cave Mtn. Rd. west of Boxley.
		You must hike down to Edgemon Cr. from near Ryker just past
		the Whitaker Point (Hawksbill Crag) trail head.  GET 
		PERMISSION FROM LOCAL LANDOWNERS BEFORE TRESPASSING ON
		PRIVATE LANDS.  Take out is at the Beech Cr. bridge at
		Hwy 21 at Boxley.  You should park at the Boxley bridge over
		the Buffalo R., since there is no room to park at the
		Beech Cr. bridge.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Boxley
	Gradient: 90 fpm (some sections approach 120 fpm)
	Length: 7.5 mi
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: The Buffalo R. should usually be running very high - over two 
		feet of water over the low water bridge at Ponca is a good sign. 
		There is a gauge painted on the river-right side of a pylon
		on the Beech Cr. bridge at Hwy 21.  A minimum put-in level would
		be around 4 feet and rising.  If the creek is already falling
		look for at least 5 feet on this gauge.  The creek drops out very
		quickly (forming many boulder sieves at low water), so plan
		for that.  The creek has been run at levels over 7 feet on
		this gauge, but at really high levels the creek is incredibly
		pushy with several near-terminal holes.  You may be able to 
		predict the levels using the Buffalo R. rain gauges which are 
		linked below.  The Ponca and Buffalo Tower gauges are the ones 
		to watch.
		LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)		
	Hazards: continuous tough rapids, strainers, undercuts, etc., etc.
	Description: Beech is quite possibly the toughest overall run in 
		the Ozarks.  The first runs/walks of Beech may have occurred in 
		the early 80's but the first complete run of the creek was 
		probably done by a small group including Jeff Green in the Fall 
		of 1986.  The rapids are long, continuous, and demanding and the 
		penalties for mistakes are usually severe.  The creek runs through
		an almost inaccessible gorge, so hiking out is very unpleasant,
		though more than a few boaters have done so.  Pins and swims are
		not uncommon events, even among boaters who know the creek well,
		and equipment can easily be broken or lost if a mishap occurs.
		The drops are non-stop, with one drop feeding right into the
		next for more than five miles.  Multiple slot drops abound,
		and paddlers unfamiliar with the creek will need to take
		plenty of time to scout to avoid the many dead-end slots and 
		other hidden traps.  A few drops do stand out of the crowd.
		The first mile is known as the Jungle Gym, which starts with
		a nasty hole just 30 yards from the put-in, and provides
		only small eddies to stop in from there.  Just before the
		confluence of Edgemon Cr. and upper Beech Cr. (or Beech 
		"Proper" as it has come to be known), Beech Ball is a class
		IV drop with a tough move to miss the "Ball" at the end.
		At the confluence with Beech Proper, would-be hair
		boaters can hike up to look at a series of class IV+ drops
		just upstream on the merging creek - if time permits.
		About 150 yards from the confluence is White Lightning,
		a long slide with huge waves and a big hole at the end!
		The last drop that really stands out is Beech Falls, a nasty 
		looking class IV ledge with a reasonable line just to the 
		right of the rock splitting the drop at its lip.  It's best to 
		run angling hard left after you come around the rock, since the
		rooster tail on the right tends to knock the ever lovin crap
		out of paddlers who hit it (to quote creek pioneer Jeff Green).
		Of course, this description of the "highlights" omits dozens
		of other long, technical drops, some with thin lines around
		dangerous hazards.  Beech Cr. basically throws everything in
		the book at you for five miles in a row, wearing paddlers
		down and making it arguably the most difficult overall run 
		in the Midwest.  Several of the area's best creek boaters have 
		come away from the creek with damaged egos, equipment, and
		bodies!  Regardless of your skill level, the best way to 
		tackle Beech is to run it behind someone who has been there 
		before.  The creek is a BIG step up from creeks like Richland, 
		EFLB, etc.  Make sure you're ready for it and take your creek
		boat with you for this one.  Thanks go to Ryan Johnson and Shelby 
		Johnson for information on this legendary Ozark creek!

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Ben Doodle Cr.

	Rating: IV-V
	TDCR: 9895
	Location: The take-out is at the popular Hwy 220 bridge over Lee Cr.
		(the put-in for section 2 of Lee). To get to the put-in
		take Hwy 220 south from Lee Cr. (the paved side) until you
		almost reach the top of the hill. Turn off on the first
		major dirt road to the left. This is the road that goes
		from Hwy. 220 to Chester and Hwy. 71. Follow this road for
		approx. 5 miles until you reach a four-way intersection
		(there is a house with a large cedar fence at the
		intersection). Take a left (a 120 degree switchback) and
		drive about 2 miles. You'll eventually see a private RV
		hookup on the right. Just past this RV hookup, a road turns
		left and immediately forks in two directions. (If you get to
		a small chruch and cemetery on the left you've gone too far.)
		Take the right fork down the hill if you have a 4WD or park
		at the camping spot on the left fork and hike down 1/8 mile
		to the creek. The first tiny creek that the road crosses is
		Ben Doodle Cr.
	Topo Quad(s): Rudy NE
	Gradient: 350 fpm (1/2 mi @ 550 fpm)
	Length: 7.5 mi (counting 5.75 miles on Blackburn Cr. and Lee Cr.)
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: The best way to gauge it is to inspect the put-in. Water
		should be filling the streambed and the creek should look
		easily boatable where the road crosses it. The big
		slide just downstream of the road should be able to be
		run without slowing the boat down much on the way down.
		Keep in mind that the water you see at the put-in is
		basically all of the water you have in the gorge. If
		Lee Cr. is at 15+ feet and Clear Cr. at Chester is in
		flood you MIGHT have enough water to run Ben Doodle.
		Ben Doodle has a much smaller watershed than Hart Cr., 
		and it takes a very heavy rain (2.5+ inches) in a very
		short time to bring it up.
	Hazards: waterfalls, undercut rocks, trees, barbed wire (at the
		first rapid), and continous, heavy rapids 
	Description: Ben Doodle Cr. may be the fastest and most difficult 
		creek run in Crawford Co.  It's certainly the steepest run I
		I know of that you can drive to!  This tiny creek was first run
		at very low levels on April, 5 1999 by Steve "Dog" Robertson, 
		Zack Smith, Rob Pollan, Mike Echols, and Bill Herring. Quite a 
		few rapids were not run on the first descent due to the water 
		level, and those that were run were not at full speed -
		much of the creek was shallow class III+ water at the first
		descent level.  It was attempted again about two years later at 
		a very high level by Mikle and Rob, but that time high water
		made several rapids extremely hazardous.  As a result, there 
		are several rapids in the gorge that have yet to be run.
		This tiny creek needs a lot of rainfall to reach runnable
		levels, and once it gets there, it doesn't stay there 
		long. When you get to the put-in, don't put on the creek
		at the road crossing. A barbed wire fence hangs into
		the creek just around the corner. Carry your boat down 30
		yards or so and put in just past the fences if you want
		to run the 18+ foot "Doodle Slide" to start off
		the run. Be careful to not get washed downstream at
		the bottom the the slide because another barbed wire
		strand hangs at the lip of the next small fall that
		immediately follows the slide. Portage from the base of
		Doodle Slide around this next fence.  After this portage,
		the creek drops over back-to-back class III+ drops 
		through trees. This is the warmup stretch for the gorge, so 
		if you have trouble here, it's a good idea to hike out 
		before you reach the more intense rapids below. About 
		1/4 mile down you'll run into a brutal drop of twelve feet
		nicknamed "The Midget Maker".  This rapid has a completely
		blind approach - by the time you see the horizon line you 
		are committed to the drop.  There is however a good eddy 
		that can be used to stop and portage the drop just
		above it.  Scout ahead dilligently until you get past
		this drop!  The drop lands on solid rock - a probe 
		boat dropped over on the first run slammed into the 
		streambed only one foot under the surface!  Portage
		Midget Maker on the right. You're now in the gorge and the
		intensity just keeps increasing from here down. After
		another 100 yards of complex drops, you'll stumble
		into "Atom Smasher". Scout ahead at every turn
		after Midget Maker to keep from being swept into this huge
		drop against your will. This rapid starts as an simple
		rock jumble, goes around a corner, drops through some
		large twisting drops and then finishes with a big slide.
		The total vertical drop between starting and stopping is
		over 40 feet. If you come around the first innocent
		looking corner, you'll probably be running the entire
		rapid, so approach this one with care. Several complex
		class III+ to IV drops follow Atom Smasher. There are few
		places to stop, so when you do get stopped scout ahead to
		the next pool or eddy. The gradient in this stretch 
		approaches pegs out at over 500 fpm. When you see a 
		house-sized rock on the left ahead of you, get out to portage
		a large deadfall just around the corner. Take this oppoutunity
		to scout the next 150 yards. Somewhere in that distance the
		creek goes from moderately crazy to completely insane as
		it enters the 700+ fpm gradient around Tenderizer and
		Masticator. Where Tenderizer actually begins is debatable
		It is simply the name for the multiple class IV to IV+
		drops that proceed the 18 foot class V drop of Masticator.
		Scout this stretch very carefully, as there are many hidden
		hazards. If you decide to run it, set plenty of bank support
		in strategic places along the way. A blown line here could
		result in serious problems. If you make the decision to 
		portage Masticator, either bank will work well. After
		Masticator, you'll get 1/3 mile of more class III to IV drops.
		This is not as intense as the section just above, but don't
		let your gaurd down too quickly. After that, the creek mellows
		to continous class II-III with lots of trees until it
		merges into a flooded Blackburn Cr. At these extremely
		high levels Blackburn and Lee Cr. can present some serious
		hazards as well. Don't play around with these creeks at
		these levels. After you merge with Lee Cr. watch for Hart
		Cr. to come in on the left. When it does, get to the far
		left side of the creek to skirt a huge, deadly hydraulic
		that forms across Lee Cr. just below the Hart Cr. confluence.
		At floodstage, the 6 mile trip down Blackburn and Lee to
		the Hwy. 220 bridge should only take 1.5 hours or so.
		Dispite the rather silly name, Ben Doodle is a serious 
		Ozark creek run. As is typicall of Crawford Co. the rapids
		are generally ugly boulder piles often with no really
		good routes.  The creek is tiny, but that actually works
		against a paddler when there is sufficient water, providing
		little or no maneuvering room.  A pre-run hike is an
		excellent idea, but nothing will eliminate the need for
		almost continuous bank scouting in the gorge.  As a result
		it's a good idea to plan on taking three to four hours
		to navigate the half mile long gorge.  Ben Doodle is a
		big step up from its sister creek, Hart Cr. If there is any
		doubt, run Hart Cr., which features class III+ to IV+
		rapids in a less threatening environment. Both of these are 
		no place for those who are not absolutely confident of 
		their abilities on fast, tight Ozark creeks and class IV+ 
		water.

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Big Devils Fork Cr.

	Rating: III-V *
	TDCR: 8786
	Location: Newton Co.; Go south, downhill from Iceledo Gap to Hill
		Cemetery (4WD required).  Drag downhill about 0.1 mile to
		put-in.  Creek looks too small at put in, but do it anyway.
 		Take-out is at Richland Creek Campground.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Moore
	Gradient: 190 fpm (not counting Richland)
	Length: 2.4 mi. plus 1.5 mi. on Richland
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Water should be nearly flush with Richland Campground bridge 
		or above 6 ft on the ACC Bulletin Board gauge.  Also, look for
 		1.5" or more rain at the Deer and Ben Hur rain gauges, as
		posted on the ACC Bulletin Board.  Rain must have fallen
		within the last 6 to 12 hours for a run.  At very high levels,
		expect a solid class V run for 4 miles.
	Hazards: severe undercuts, difficult rapids, overhanging branches,
		strainers, waterfalls
	Description:  First known descent of this creek was on April 11, 1995
		by Cowper Chadbourn, Charles Chevallier, Andy Hicks, Nathan
		Kline, and Joe Warren (of Galveston), with the exception of
		Big Devil's Fall (one of the Twin Falls) which was first run
		by Nathan Kline on April 29, 1995.  This run begins as a
		creek so tiny that you will think you have made a mistake,
		but it quickly builds in intensity.  The run has many tough
		class III to IV rapids sprinkled with a generous helping of
		strainers and undercut rocks.  The highlight of the trip is
		the run of the Twin Falls near the confluence with Richland Cr.
		Depending on water level, you may either run the Big Devils
		(left) side, or access and run the the Long Devils side via a
		short carry.  As of December, 1995, of 20+ runs divided
		between the Twin Falls, only two or three "pitons" have
		occurred, all on Long Devil's Falls (river right).  Keep your
		speed up and try to launch well into the pool, running either
		of the falls slightly left of center.  Be prepared for a "big
		water" run through some of Richland's most difficult rapids
		after the confluence (IV+ at these levels).  All rapids have
		been run, although the boulder jumble just below the first
		waterfall has been marginal for water levels encountered to
		date.  Big Devils Fork, like its sister creek, is an "experts
		only" run.  The extremely tight course, high gradient, and 
		numerous hazards combine to pose a significant risk of life
		and limb for even the most experienced boaters.  Thanks go
		to Cowper Chadbourn for information on this great Ozark hair
		run.
		See Lance Jones' Pages for more info on Big Devils Cr.		

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Big Piney Cr.

	Rating: II
	TDCR: 2224
	Location:  Johnson and Pope Co.;
		S1: Take Hwy 7 north from I-40 at Russelville, and then take
			Hwy 123 west to Fort Douglas.  Put in at Hwy 123
			bridge.  Take out at Helton's Farm reached by taking
			Hwy 164 west from Hwy 7 then NFR 1801 to NFR 1805
			and heading west toward the river.
		S2: Take out at Long Pool Rec. Area west of NFR 1801 on
			NFR 1804.
		S3: Take out at Hwy 164 bridge.  Kerry Moore at Moore
			Outdoors located just south of the bridge provides
			canoes and/or shuttles for the run.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Fort Douglas, Treat
	Gradient: 10 - 20 fpm
	Length:	S1: 8 mi.
		S2: 10 mi.
		S3: 5 mi.
	Season: SPRING and FALL
	Gauge: Readings can be obtained by calling the Corps at
		501-324-5150 or by calling Moore Outdoors.  The level should
		be between 2.8 and 5.0 ft. for good canoeing.  Advanced boaters
		can enjoy pushy big water up to 7.0 ft.
		LINK TO USGS GAUGE
	Hazards: pourover hydraulics at high levels, the Little Mother rock
	Description: S1 is a good class I-II run for canoeists. Beware of
		downed trees in this section.  S2 is a great play run for
		intermediate boaters and a challenging run for beginners.
		Some of the best action on S2 comes 3/4 of the way down at
		Surfing Rapid and The Mother.  The left side of The Mother 
		is a tricky class II+ to III rapid at any level, and the 
		Little Mother, a midstream boulder, seems to attract canoes 
		like a magnet. Surfing rapid usually has a good wave and a 
		very forgiving wash out.  Many Ozark boaters have cut their 
		teeth on this stretch.  S3 is more tamed down, but at high 
		water it kicks up big waves at The Haystacks.  Just below 
		Long Pool you can go left or right of an island.  The right 
		is a rather tricky chute I call Plinko.  Most beginners will 
		want to stay away from this rapid, especially at high water.

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Blackburn Cr.

	Rating: II-III
	TDCR: 3335
	Location: The put-in can be reached by driving down off of Hwy 74.
		The only real "public" access is off of the Holt
		Road Loop near Devils Den State Park. Take Hwy 74 west off
		of I-540 until you are just about to drop down the hill
		into the State Park. When you see a "steep grade"
		truck warning sign take the dirt road on your left. This is
		just past a gated road on the left, and it is before the
		main access to the Holt Road (near the parking area). Past
		this point the roads are 4WD only! Follow the dirt road
		about 1 mile. Look for a road to turn left and go steeply
		downhill toward the creek. Follow this road for about 1 to
		1.5 miles until you reach the creek. The road is extremely
		rough in wet weather, so you may want to stop and walk down
		if it looks too bad. The take out is (unfortunately) at Lee
		Cr. at the Hwy 220 bridge (the put in for section 2 of Lee
		Cr.). It's best to shuttle back to I-540 and then down
		through Chester, because Fall Cr. will probably block you
		if you take the route through Devils Den and up Hwy 220!
		You can also put in by carrying down off of I-540 where it
		crosses one of the far upper tributaries if there is a lot
		of water in the creek. This hasn't been done yet, as far as
		I know, but it is possible and will add quite a bit of
		class II-III water onto the run.
	Topo Quad(s): ???
	Gradient: 25 fpm
	Length: 8 mi.
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: Lee Cr. should be above 6.5 or so for a possible Blackburn
		run. If Lee is above 7.5 and assuming an even distribution
		of rainfall in the watershed, Blackburn will have plenty of
		water. Be careful that all of the water in Lee isn't
		comming from Fall Cr. and Upper Lee Cr. (i.e. Devils Den
		Park), which can happen. If Lee Cr. is over 10 feet expect
		a much more serious ride down Blackburn. At over 15 feet on
		the Lee Cr. gauge, strainers make much of the creek a death
		trap, and other good area creeks are just hitting their
		prime. A flood run on Blackburn would just be a dangerous
		waste of time.
	Hazards: Strainers and downed trees are the main hazard. There are a
		few good hydraulics to look out for too though.
	Description: Blackburn Cr. is a great class II+ wilderness run that has
		been overlooked for years. The creek was probably first
		run in the mid 80's, but very few boaters have ever done
		it. The biggest problem is finding a put-in. When I-540
		first opened, one of the comments I heard the most from
		boaters was that it crossed Blackburn Cr. tributaries
		several times and would provide a potential public access
		to the creek. While I still don't know anyone who has
		tried this, it is a very real possibility. Asuuming you
		can find a good way to get to the creek, you'll have a
		bouncy run through several miles of wild country. There
		are plenty of strainers along the way and lots of fast
		curves and swift rapids. Other than the trees, there are
		no really serious hazards for competent class II-III
		boaters. If the water is high (e.g. Lee Cr. is over 10 to
		12 feet), watch out for some dangerous hydraulics,
		especially an almost river-wide "hole-o-death"
		that forms just past the Hart Cr. confluence on Lee Cr. At
		high levels, Blackburn becomes pushy enough to elevate
		some rapids into the class III category, but the strainers
		become nearly unavoidable. It's probably a good idea to
		find another run when the creek is running full tilt. At
		any level, all boaters should be experienced with fast
		class II-III water and dodging strainers.

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Bobtail Cr.

	Rating: III-IV+
	TDCR: 7776
	Location: Searcy Co.; Go south from Richland Campground 3.6 miles
		on FS 1205, then east (left) 2.0 miles on FS 1219, and
		finally north (another left) 3.0 miles on FS 1219A.  From
		this point turn east on a barely visible 4WD road that
		descends a hill.  If conditions are bad you may have to
		carry the 0.7 mile down to the creek on this road.
		Take out is on S2 of Richland Cr.  Optional takeout is to 
		carry approx. 1.0 miles along trail back up to the Richland
		Campground bridge.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Moore
	Gradient: 125 fpm  (1 mi @ 165 fpm)
	Length: 2.5 mi. (+ 9.5 mi on S2 of Richland Cr.)
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Richland Cr. Campground bridge should have above 1 ft. of 
		airspace (About 4.0 ft or higher on the USGS web gauge).   
		Recent heavy local rains are a must for this run.
		Look for Falling Water Falls to be runnable all the way
		across.  This is a good indication of water on Bobtail.  Look 
		for 1.5 inches or more of rain in the last 12 hours on 
		the Tilly and Ben Hur rain gauges on the BNR site.
	Hazards: undercuts, hydraulics, difficult rapids, and, of course, strainers 
	Description: This one was first run in Jan, 1994, by Cowper Chadbourn,
		Jim McDaniel, and Paul Newton.  It contains about ten very
		significant rapids and lots of class III action in between.
		For the first 0.75 miles, the creek is shallow fast class II-III with 
		willows.  Good place to warm up, this section is also prone to downed 
		trees.  Be on the lookout for a sweeping bend to the left terminating in a 
		log jam.  Sometimes the logs can be jumped, many times a portage on the 
		left is needed.  Immediately below this jam is the first set of good drops. 
		First 'Zorro' starts with a tight slot back to the left behind a pin rock. 
		Cut back to the right after the slot, avoid the undercut on the right and 
		line up for the wave/hole train that follows.  Snake through the 
		rock gardens below with a 4-foot double ledge in the middle.  A 
		large boulder rising vertically from the right signifies time to 
		eddy left.  The next drop is 'Go Left Falls' aka 'Cowper Dam'.  Most 
		of the water flows off a rock slanted to the right and into a narrow slot and
		undercut.  Get up plenty of speed and go off the end of the flat rock.  
		Several encounters with the slot have produced bruised bodies and egos. Next 
		is 'Coliseum' originally known as 'Go Right Falls' due to a tree in the left 
		slot on the first runs.  Main channel goes right and over a 6-foot 
		stairstep.  Alternate route is to run the slots on the left and boof into 
		the eddy.  Take the straight line in the runout through a 3 foot wide slot. 
		Now the pre-show is over and you get brief intermission of more fast class 
		II-III water as Little Bobtail and Short Bobtail enter to pump up the 
		volume.  When the creek cuts back to the left over a horizon line, you're 
		ready for the feature presentation.  The next 0.75 miles is Ozark steep 
		creekin' at its best.  Major rapids are 'Bail-Baby-Bail', 'Werewolf', 'The 
		Funnel' and 'The Slot'.  'Bail-Baby-Bail' starts at the horizon line and is 
		a long drop with undercuts, trees, holes and pin potential.  Main line is 
		to enter down the slide right, avoid the rooster tail rock and tree, over 
		the ledge, around the corner to the right and down through the series of 
		holes to the left.  The holes tend to push hard to the right and into the 
		shallow rocks on the bottom right side.  Finish through some tight slots 
		after the recovery eddys below the holes.  Creek turns left again and 
		enters 'Werewolf'.  Enter on the slide right and catch the right eddy, 
		ferry back to the left above the Fang rock and down through the series of 
		holes.  A couple nice ledge drops follow before the entrance to the 
		'Funnel'.  Again trees growing in the middle of the rock garden hide the 
		horizon line.  Enter right and punch the ledge hole, and ride the flume 
		down through a couple more holes into the eddy-pool below.  Several more 
		good rock jumbles follow.  Be on the look for a rapid where the flume 
		narrows to 10-12 feet and ends in a house sized boulder on the left bank as 
		the creek cuts sharp right.  A large eddy to the left is a good place to 
		stop and prepare for 'The Slot'.  The creek bends back to the left and cuts 
		back right as it funnels between two large boulders slanting in from each 
		bank.  Build up speed to punch the entrance wave-holes and the final hole 
		at the bottom.  This hole has provided numerous creekboat rodeos.  The meat 
		of the hole is river left, but the right bank below the hole is undercut, 
		so the best line is to punch through the center.  The eddy/pool below feeds 
		a 5 foot offset ledge drop.  The left bank below the drop is very sharp 
		limestone.  Best line is to boof straight of the far right side, but avoid 
		the left edge of the right half of the ledge or you will likely piton on  
		the lip and fall into the hole.  Some more class III follows to the 
		confluence with Richland.  Paddlers need to be very, very confident 
		on Richland before trying this run.  It is a mean little steep creek, 
		on par with Beech or Shop Cr., only shorter.  Thanks go to Cowper 
		Chadbourn and Lance Jones for a description of this one.  
		See Lance Jones' Pages for more info on Bobtail Cr.

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Boen Gulf Cr.

	Rating: IV-V
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Newton Co.; To reach the put-in, follow Hwy 21 south from 
	    Boxley toward Mossville. After you pass Mossville, look for a 
	    bermed road on your right that has a large turnout area where 
	    several cars can be parked near the highway. This is the access 
	    for Paradise Falls described in Tim Ernst's Arkansas Waterfalls
	    book.  Park and drag over the berm and down the old logging road.  
	    The hike to the creek is about a half mile total, but it's not 
	    too bad a brushwhack if you can manage to stay on the old roads.  
	    Pass the first road trace that turns to the right and continue 
	    as the main road bears to the left (south). Take the next old 
	    road trace downhill on the right and follow it as it heads down 
	    and back to the northwest. The next turn is very hard to find. 
	    You'll pass one road trace going downhill toward the creek on your 
	    left, but keep going a bit further and take the second one. This 
	    one barely looks like a road anymore, and it's easy to get lost in 
	    the woods on the way down. If you follow it correctly, you'll 
	    intersect the creek very high up in the watershed at an elevation 
	    of about 1980 feet,just above a 5-foot ledge where the old road 
	    crosses the creek. Ernst's book and a good GPS and compass are 
	    very helpful. It's a good idea to hike down this trail before 
	    you have a chance to run the creek, just to make sure you can find 
	    it!
	Topo Quad(s): Fallsville, Boxley
	Gradient: 230 fpm (300 fpm max)
	Length: 10.25 mi. (2.75 miles on Boen Gulf plus 7.5 miles on Hailstone Cr.)
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: The USGS Buffalo at Boxley should be very high - 8+ feet is a good 
	    indicator. However, if you wait for the gauge to update, you may have 
	    missed the water. Look for 2.5+ inches of rain in just a few hours on 
	    the Buffalo Tower and Swain rain gauges and get there when the rain 
	    stops to catch the creek. Smith Cr. is a good indicator - look at 
	    Smith from the Hwy 21 bridge. If it's muddy and running high, you 
	    probably will have enough water on Boen Gulf.  The only way to be 
	    sure is to jog down to the creek and climb back out to either boat 
	    or drive on - not an easy task, but one that can avert the unpleasant 
	    experience of dragging a boat back up the hill if the water level 
	    is in doubt.
        LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)
	Hazards: strainers, severely undercut rocks, severe rapids, hydraulics, 
        waterfalls, etc.
	Description: Boen Gulf sheds more total gradient than just about any 
	    other Ozark steep creek. Dropping 650 feet in just under three miles, 
	    it falls from the top of the Ozark plateau down to the Buffalo River 
	    valley through three distinct gorges. The put-in elevation of 1980 
	    feet is probably the highest anywhere in the Ozarks; you're still in 
	    the nosebleed section when you launch your boat. The rapids range 
	    from fairly tame to some of the wildest drops yet attempted in 
	    Arkansas. If you can find the put-in (no small feat), the creek 
	    starts by dropping over a small ledge with a punchy hole into a 
	    large eddy on the right in a shallow cave. This starts the first 
	    gorge of the creek, but the rapids are relatively tame class III 
	    for the next 1/4 mile. You probably should be scraping some rocks 
	    here, or the level downstream may be more than you want in places! 
	    The first big drop presents a large horizon line and warrants a scout. 
	    "Dog Barf Falls" is a fairly straightforward ledge, but it foreshadows 
	    bigger things to come! After Dog Barf are two very rocky drops 
	    back-to-back. At all but the highest water levels, these will need 
	    to be portaged down to the next confluence. A creek merging from the 
	    left doubles the flow - a common occurrence on the way down Boen Gulf. 
	    There are always trees to contend with in the next couple of miles, 
	    and the current doesn't slow down very often, so be alert. Just after 
	    a small drop into a creek-wide hole, get out at the top of a low-angle 
	    slide to scout "Paradise Falls" on the left bank. It's hard to see 
	    the bottom from the top - a rope to rappel down somewhere on the left 
	    side of the gorge is an excellent idea. Paradise is about as impressive 
	    as it gets in the Ozarks: a fast slide with some tricky diagonal 
	    holes feeds a near-vertical fall that is 25+ feet high. The water 
	    explodes off of rifts in the rock face on the way down creating ominous 
	    looking rooster tails before it all crashes into a big hole at the 
	    bottom. The fall has been run several times, but high-volume creek 
	    boats with blunt, rockered bows are essential gear. A feasible line 
	    is down the middle of the drop, hopefully maintaining an upright 
	    attitude all the way down. This is class V creekin at its finest, and 
	    the portage on the left may be nastier than running the drop! After 
	    leaving Paradise, the creek settles down as it emerges from the first 
	    gorge. Dozens of class III drops, and at least one tougher rapid are on 
	    the agenda until the creek seems to disappear into a big pile of rocks. 
	    Get out on the left to scout or on the right to portage the next 1/8 
	    mile. This is the second gorge consisting of large drops with many 
	    hazardous undercuts and sieves. A large siphon under the rock in 
	    the last drop awaits any swimmers, forming a deadly, hidden trap. 
	    This is nasty, class V+ water that most boaters will want to portage 
	    in its entirety. At the end of the ugly gradient is a small pool 
	    leading into a jumbled drop on the right that feeds onto a low-angle 
	    slide. Catch an eddy at the end of the slide where rocks push the creek 
	    to the far left into a slot. This is "Smack Yer Bottom", a ten-foot 
	    spout landing on a bedrock slide. The impact at the bottom will hit 
	    you very hard with a landing that is too flat or too steep. A screw 
	    up in the churning slot above could result in very serious injuries. 
	    The portage on the right side is simple. The slide continues down 
	    to another creek confluence that marks the end of the second gorge. 
	    The rapids mellow out for a short while, but a third gorge awaits! 
	    You'll suddenly find yourself looking for eddies among the rocks. 
	    The creek twists and drops constantly for the next 1/3 mile. Some 
	    drops that might be singled out are "Huck & Duck," where a huge dead 
	    tree on the first descent forced everyone to duck while running a 
	    slot drop into an undercut rock, "Splat To Hell," where a relatively 
	    easy looking drop bends sharply right, pushing into a boiling pile 
	    that will trap wayward boaters in a sieve on the left, and
	    "Double Crack," which presents two interesting ways to vertically 
	    pin at the same spot in the midle and a potentially nasty surf 
	    on the sneak route on the far right.  This section presents dozens 
	    of opportunities for pins and is basically one long class IV+ rapid 
	    when the water is up good. Just before reaching the Hailstone, the 
	    rapids ease up and the gorge recedes. The Hailstone will no doubt 
	    be in flood, with lots of huge waves and big holes to deal with. On 
	    the first descent, the group made it down Boen Gulf in good shape, 
	    but had multiple swimmers in the willow jungles on the Hailstone 
	    just above Boxley. Don't let your guard down! The first known descent 
	    was made on 5/16/2003 by Bill "Fish" Herring, Noah Fraiser, Lance 
	    "Lazer" Jones, Ray Skinner, Billy Williams, Mike Oglesby, and 
	    Kyle Bogard. Obviously Boen Gulf is only suitable for boaters 
	    comfortable on steep, class IV+ water who have their helmets 
	    strapped on tight!	

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Boss Hollow

	Rating: IV-V *
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Turn West from Hwy 7 at the "Who Would Have Thought It Gift
		Shop". Take the left hand fork about 1.2 miles to the 6th
		drive/road to the left. Park and carry or drive 0.75 mile
		(4WD only) to a gate. An ATV trail leads downhill just
		before the gate. Drag downhill about 0.5 miles to put-in
		(elevation 1560 ft). Reach the take out by taking the right
		fork at the gift shop down the hill to Hurricane Creek
		put-in. At the bottom of the hill the road forks. The left
		fork fords a creek. If the creek is high park here and carry
		boats out 0.5 mile. If crossable, drive 0.5 mile to house
		on right in left hand bend. Ask permission to park in the
		clearing provided by landowner (Very nice!) 
	Topo Quad(s): Deer, Fort Douglas, Lurton, Sand Gap
	Gradient: 200 fpm
	Length: 4 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Gage at Richland Campground needs to be above 6. Look for
		1.5 inches or more rain at the Deer and Ben Hur rain gages, as
		posted on the ACC Resource Page. Rain must have fallen
		within the last 6 to 12 hours. If the small creek at the
		bottom of the take-out road is to the point you think
		about not driving across, it's a definite run! 
	Hazards: Undercut ledges and rocks, overhanging branches, strainers,
		waterfalls. Very tight in places (pinning hazzards).
		Vertical pins possible on left side of "THE BOSS". Avoid
		"The Undercut"! 
	Description: First known descent was December 17, 1995. By Cowper
		Chadbourn, Chris Anderson, Chris Jones, Nathan Kline, and
		Lance Jones. The creek starts out fast and narrow dropping
		over several small slides and ledges. The run is 2 miles on
		Boss Hollow (200 fpm with 400 fpm max) then 2
		miles on Buck Branch (80 fpm). Approximately 0.25
		miles into the run there is a small ledge into a pool. Now the
		tight and technical section starts. Lots of pin possibilities
		here. This is where the Toilet Bowl and Baby Boss
		Slide are encountered. These are followed shortly by
		Face Slap Falls and Sycamore Slot. After several more
		extended fast continuous rapids there is another small
		ledge into a pool. The exit to the pool is usually
		cluttered/blocked with logs. Scout on the right bank. This
		is the entrance to THE BOSS, a very serious drop. This
		is the combination of the entrance to the big
		slide (Performance Evaluation), the big slide
		(Broken Paddle) and the last ledge (Half A Paddle).
		Pick your way around the wood or carry. Run down the
		main channel to the left through a slot, over a ledge
		and down a narrow slide and hang a 90 degree right to the
		big slide. Make sure you slide down the right half of the
		slide to avoid the nasty vertical pins on the left side.
		The last ledge into a small pool can create a strong
		hydraulic. Very shortly (100-150 yds) the creek takes a
		sharp turn to the left and funnels down a 3-4 ft. wide
		slot. This is "The Undercut!" A large house foundation
		sized slab rock at least 50% undercut. Run as far left as
		possible. (up on the wall is my preferred route) The next
		0.25 mile to Buck Branch is known as Cheesegrater. A
		long continuous shoal with several surf holes. At low
		water it feels like a your sliding down a cheesegrater.
		(At least your boat will be lighter for the carry out!).
		The final 2 miles down Buck Branch have many class III
		drops and several play spots. Take out just above
		Hurricane Creek at house beside the creek. Like other
		micro-volume creeks, meaningful ratings are difficult to
		establish on the accepted International scale. At lower
		levels, the creek will seem like a very technical Class
		III, with much rock bashing, scraping, and some portages.
		At higher levels, several rapids are expected to become
		solid Class V. Either way, because of the hazards, 
		Boss Hollow should be treated with a lot of respect.  Make
		sure you're ready for a serious run before putting in.
		(Thanks to Lance Jones for the description of this
		great Ozark creek!)

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Boulder Cr.

     Rating: IV-V+ (P)
        TDCR: 9996
        Location: Newton Co.;  Put-in is near Mt. Sherman and Kyles Landing
                on Hwy. 74.  You're looking for a dirt road leading steeply
                downhill roughly across from the road to Kyles Landing.
                It should go down quickly to some pastures and you want to
                stay right past a house on your right.  Just past this
                the road turns ugly and only determined 4WD will make it
                to the bottom.  About 150 yards downhill is an old 
                abandoned shack of a house.  Assemble gear here and then
                hike straight down the old road to the creek about 75 yards
                downhill.  The takeout is reached by following the Mt. Sherman
                Cemetery Road south toward Diamond Cave.  Park on the LEFT
                (creek) side of the road just upstream of the slab stream
                crossing.  Do not block the driveway on right side.
		Area Map
        Topo Quad(s): Jasper, Parthenon
        Gradient: 250 fpm (1.25 mile @ >500 fpm)
        Length: 2.75 mi
        Season: FLOOD
        Gauge: Only runnable after extended heavy rainfall.
                Buffalo R. should be over 2 or 3 ft. over the Ponca bridge.
                Beech Cr. should have plenty of water.  The creek should
                look flush with water at the takeout - unless it's raining,
                you'll lose most of the flow by the time you finish the run.
        Hazards: continuous severe rapids, unrunnable boulder sieves,
                numerous undercut rocks, keeper hydraulics, numerous strainers
        Description: Boulder is not your typical Ozark steep creek run.
                The vital statistics of the creek are sobering for paddlers.
                First, the gradient is amazing: 250 fpm average, but that
                includes a 60 fpm half mile at the end.  The steepest part
                is found in a quarter mile near the end, known simply as 
                The Falls, that drops almost 200 ft in that distance.  The 
                creek also lives up to its name; huge boulders abound creating
                nearly continuous and blind class IV-V rapids mixed with
                sieves of questionable runnability.  And the watershed is 
                large by Ozark standards - the lower two miles of the creek
                is fed by runnoff from almost four square miles of land.
                A trip down Boulder Cr. sets the paddler up for a full day
                of mental and physical stress testing that is unrivaled
                anywhere in the state (and few places in the country).
                The first attempt on the creek was made on 11/7/96 by 
                Bill and Chanoy Herring and Kevin Fendley.  A 3/4 mile 
                section of the creek was completed before an injury
                forced the group to hike out of the gorge.  The first
                successful run of the gorge happened during the memorable
                "Earth Day Floods" on April 23, 2004, when Zach Williams,
                Sean Ruggles, and Bill Herring completed the entire trip
                at an optimal level with around a dozen portages.  This
                group knew the creek intimately after numerous pre-run hikes,
                but the trip still required more than 7 hours to complete -
                despite an early start, the takeout was reached just before
                nightfall.  Hiking the creek dry before running it should 
                be considered a requirement (hike from the takeout up, not 
                the put-in down), and consideration should be given to 
                identifying landmarks for scouts and portages in advance.
                The creek begins just below an old abandoned house as a
                tiny stream and immediately plunges over an angled fall
                with a bad landing, followed by a ledge into an undercut
                grotto.  It looks a bit dicey, but the creek dishes out
                far worse for the next three miles - if the first drop
                gives you pause, a hike back to your vehicle is still an
                option.  The rapids are typically class III with small
                eddies for the next third of a mile, with a few tricky
                spots thrown in for good measure.  The Upper Gorge rears
                its ugly head when a large jumble blocks the stream under
                a pretty dripline bluff on the left.  This drop feeds into
                a severely undercut boulder - scout with care.  From here
                the creek alternates between bouts of relatively tranquil 
                water and pure class V mayhem for the next quarter mile 
                or so.  If there aren't too many trees, it is all runnable, 
                though questionable at times.  Scouting is difficult but
                essential, and these rapids must be gotten through or around
                quickly since the water level is probably dropping out
                fast and there is a lot of creek left to boat.  In the middle
                of this is maybe the biggest sheer drop on the creek -
                "Hang A Lefty".  It's an 8-foot ledge onto a rock shelf on the
                right, but the current helps funnel you left into the
                undercut base of the drop - no worries!  When you see/feel
                two tributaries kick in and the gradient slack up, be ready
                to get out.  The "Strainer Strainer" is rock sieve through
                which not much will pass - portage right.  Class III water
                provides some rest for the next quarter mile, and then
                the class IV+ "Pretzel" signals the start of the Lower Gorge.
                The bottom part of this rapid may not go at low levels.
                The infamous "Elbow" follows - a very long class V rapid
                consisting of multiple tricky ledges followed by a sharp 
                turn into an ugly-looking hole.  The only reasonable scout
                is from river right.  The next half mile presents an almost
                constant barrage of long, complex, blind drops.  This is
                a very intense section of water, but all drops are boatable
                under the right conditions.  When the bottom looks like it
                is really starting to drop out, it is.  This is "The Falls",
                so get out on either bank to scout and portage the next 
                quarter mile.  The long lead-in is solid class V (V+?) water 
                that roughly ends at a drop called the "Pearly Gate" - a 
                steep plunge between two boulders into a wicked looking hole.
                Past this is "Salvation Eddy", a semi-pool of water
                on the right bank.  Failure to reach Salvation will
                result in a severe pummeling in the monster class VI cascade
                that follows.  Even the hairiest of boaters will want
                to carefully consider this section - even just standing on 
                the bank comptemplating the ramifications of an attempt 
                at running this incredible chunk of gradient can be a 
                quasi-religious experience.  The carry down to the small
                pool below is not as bad as it first appears, and after
                the pool, a long, complex series of drops through 
                boulders leads into the base of a large cliff with a 
                cave in its base on river left.  "Cliff Rapid" is just 
                above the cliff, and unfortunately a large seive in 
                the middle of the drop is not runnable except at very 
                high levels.  It's hard to see this without careful scouting,
                so make sure you see the entire rapid before committing to
                it.  The class III-IV water after Cliff may seem easy by 
                comparison, but don't relax too soon.  Just When You Thought
                It Was Over, a tricky class IV+, comes in this stretch and
                another long, difficult rapid follows it.  From here to
                Panther Creek is solid class III+ water with some holes to
                beware of (the worst is a ledge right at the confluence
                with Panther).  Take a deep breath and paddle through
                fast class II-III water for the next third of a mile down 
                to the takeout.  Kiss the ground and walk up to run your 
                shuttle.  Boulder Cr. should obviously not be taken lightly.  
                It is a serious, all-day undertaking suitable only for a 
                team of well-prepared class V creek boaters.  Dozens of
                class V drops must be run or portaged quickly, often
                without good bank scouting or support, since water levels
                drop quickly and virtually the whole creek can sieve out.
                Expect a great deal of serious hiking/climbing though 
                jungles of poison ivy and you will not be disappointed!

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Broadwater Hollow

     Rating: IV-V
        TDCR: ????
        Location: Newton Co.; Take Hwy. 43 north from Compton about 1/2
                mile and take the dirt road on your right that's across
                from the fire station building.  Head downhill for 2
                miles on the dirt road until you reach a small creek
                crossing over a rock slab.  If there's a lot of water
                covering the slab and it's moving really fast,
                you're good to go!  Paddle down to Cecil Cr. about
                1/4 mile down and then carry back up on the left side
                of Broadwater on the hiking trail that leads back to 
                the put-in.  The hike takes about 20-30 minutes dragging
                a kayak.
        Topo Quad(s): Ponca
        Gradient: 400 fpm
        Length: 0.25 mi
        Season: FLOOD
        Gauge: Only runnable immediately after very heavy rainfall.
                Look for 2+ inches in a couple of hours on the Compton
                rain gauge at the Buffalo National River site and drive
                fast!:
				LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)
        Hazards: undercuts, downed trees, and one spine crushing drop
        Description: First run in the epic Earth Day Flood on April 24, 2004
                by Fish, Otter, Zach Williams, Sean Ruggles, Amanda
                Boster, and Trey Marley, this is the premier Park-N-Creek 
                run of the Ozarks.  The access is simple and no shuttle is 
                needed.  Just jump in your boat and hang on - though scouting
                down the creek on the left trail is a good idea for first
                timers.  The run starts with long slide that finishes with
                a seven foot spout that was first run by Sean Ruggles 
                backwards after a tightly spaced group launch turned 
                into an ugly traffic jam halfway down the slide.  This author
                can attest to the rather surprised look in Sean's eyes
                as he disappeared into the froth!  The drop's named
                "Clusterf**k" - watch out for the eddy on the left and if 
                there's much water at all expect to get backendered.  If you 
                had fun, the carry back up to run it again is not hard at all.
                The next drop is one of the more visually impressive drops 
                in the Ozarks.  Nicknamed "Honcho", this twisting falls 
                lands on a slab of limestone, making varying degrees of 
                spinal abuse possible if not likely.  Honcho is a solid
                class V drop, probably V+ at high water levels.  It's easy 
                to portage on the left, and unless you're feeling invincible
                that's probably the best route to the bottom.  Next is another
                long slide at high speed and then a jumble of rocks that
                makes for a nice class III-IV drop.  A couple of eddies lead
                over a class III+ entrance rapid and a tiny eddy above the
                lip of "Rock Slide".  This 10-foot plunge over a house-
                sized boulder looks more intimidating from the entrance than
                it is, but there's relatively little room for error since
                it immeditately feeds into some rocks and then into the 
                next series of drops.  The next 100 yards of class IV-V
                water is the "Broadwater Boogie".  A good scout and some 
                strategic bank support can prevent minor mishaps from 
                turning epic here.  Depending on water level, you'll 
                either be trying to speed up to boof or slow down to not get 
                smashed into the rocks.  There probably isn't a completely 
                clean line down the whole thing, and well laid plans tend
                to unravel before the bottom eddy is reached.  The next
                and final drop, "Big Ugly", is only runnable at very high 
                water levels over the double drop in the center of the 
                creek.  Water flows through cracks in the huge rock making 
                any line potentially hazardous.  Scout from the rocks 
                in the center, and if it doesn't look pleasant, just carry 
                up the left bank to the trail.  Cecil Creek lies at the 
                bottom of Big Ugly - make sure you take out there or it
                will be a very long walk back to the car!  If you get on
                the creek at high levels and run it quickly, you can go
                for round #2 if you have enough energy left, but expect
                a much bonier run unless it's pouring rain.  Not running 
                the first drop again would be a shame though - it boats
                well even with very low flow.  Or, if you have a lot of 
                time, head over for a chaser on Osage Cr., which should 
                have plenty of water left!  Broadwater is extremely steep
                and boaters should definitely be experienced at class V
                steep creekin' before launching a boat!

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Buffalo R.

	Rating: I-II
	TDCR: 1213
	Location: North AR., Numerous put-ins and take outs are possible
		in the 130 miles of river in the National Park.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Boxley, Ponca, Jasper, Hasty, Mt. Judea, Eula, Western
		Grove, Snowball, Marshal, Maumee, Cozahome, Big Flat,
		Buffalo City
	Gradient: Boxley to Ponca: 20 fpm
		  Ponca to Kyle's Landing: 15 fpm
		  Rest of the river: less than 10 fpm
	Length: about 130 spectacularly beautiful miles!
	Season: ALL except very dry summer months
	Gauge: Readings can be obtained by calling the Corps at
		501-324-5150.  Levels for several locations are given.
		LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)
		LINK TO USGS GAUGE
	Hazards: none
	Description: The Buffalo is the first U.S. National River.  It is
		exceedingly rich in history and beauty.  A discussion of this
		river is far beyond the scope of this humble document.  Suffice
		it to say that it would be difficult to find a more spectacular
		river anywhere in the world.  The whitewater is at its best
		in the spring on the upper sections from Boxley to Kyle's
		Landing.  But the whitewater is not the primary reason to float
		this river.  The towering, multi-colored bluffs, the clear,
		cool, green water, and the abundant wildlife (including some
		imported elk) are the main attractions.  See Tom Kennon's
		guidebook "Ozark Whitewater" or one of the many books
		written about the Buffalo for more information on this fantastic
		river.  If you catch the river at high water, check out the
		good kayak play run from Boxley to Ponca.  This stretch is
		more challenging than the downstream sections, and it
		is the only one you can run when the Park Service closes the
		river due to high water.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Cadron Cr.

	Rating: I-II
	TDCR: 2113
	Location:  Faulkner and Cleburne Co.;  Take Hwy. 65 north from Conway
		to Hwy. 310 (west of Guy).  Take 310 northeast for a 2.5 mi.
		until you reach the bridge over the Cadron.  Put in at 
		this point.  You can take out at Hwy. 65 bridge (3.5 miles
		downstream) or float down to the Hwy. 285 bridge south
		of Damascus.  
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Guy, Damascus
	Gradient: 10 fpm
	Length: 13.5 mi.
	Season: SPRING and FALL
	Gauge: Call Howard Elliot Outfitters at 501-679-5050.
	Hazards: minor strainer problems
	Description: This is a good run to catch after a good rain, and it's
		only 45 minutes from Little Rock.  The river offers some
		good class II rapids in the first few miles, and at high
		levels there are some good surfing opportunities.  Rent a
		canoe from Howard Elliot if you don't want to bring yours
		along and mess with the shuttle.   

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Cedar Cr.

	Rating: II+
	TDCR: 4444
	Location: Crawford Co.;  Take Hwy. 282 west from I-540 to Rudy, then
		take the Hobbtown Rd. north from Rudy to Hobbtown.  There is
		a put-in on the East Fork of Cedar Cr. at Hobbtown (adds
		about a mile to the run).  To get to the West Fork of Cedar
		follow Hwy. 162 west from Hobbtown.  Put in at the bridge.
		The take out is on the Frog Bayou in Rudy.  Other
		put-ins/take-outs are possible on the many county roads
		in the area.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Rudy
	Gradient: 50 fpm
	Length: 7 mi.
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: The Frog Bayou should be probably be running at least 5 ft.
		for a run. Also there is a gauge is on the west side of the western
		most bridge abutment on Hwy 348.  This gauge should be at least zero
		inches for a run on Cedar Cr. and 4 inches for a run on the West Fork
		or East Fork (above the confluence).  There is also a gauge on the Hwy
		162 bridge over the West Fork but it isn't graduated or calibrated.
		The gauge is located on the upstream side of the west bridge abutment.
		You need water to the bottom of that gauge to run the West Fork.
	Hazards: mostly strainers
	Description: This run is a fun class II to II+ run down a small, swift
		creek.  Many different runs are possible.  The most play oppoutunities
		can be found on the West Fork between the Hwy 162 bridge and the
		confluence with the East Fork.  The surfing in this stretch is some
		of the best in the state, with continous waves and holes.  The first
		major hole below the 162 bridge can be a boat keeper at high levels,
		so have a good plan for getting out before you get in.  The East Fork
		can also be boated from the Hwy. down.  It is a smaller, steeper stream,
		but it doesn't have the quality surfing spots of the West Fork.  Watch
		out for an 8 foot high dam that must be portaged on the East Fork
		about a mile below the 162 bridge.  Watch for strainers and trees that
		can be hazardous on most of the creek, but which are especially bad on
		the East Fork.  Also beware of some barbed wire strands on the East Fork
		near a small low-water crossing.  The bridge at the confluence of the
		East and West forks makes a good take out for the Fork runs or a
		good put in when the water is too low upstream.  Drive to this bridge
		from Hobbtown Rd. (to the East of Cedar Cr.).  The lower part of
		Cedar Cr. has many good rapids and playspots in the 5 miles to the
		Frog Bayou.  It can often be boated when the West Fork and East Fork
		are too low to paddle.  Cedar Cr. is a great alternative to a run on
		Lee Cr. and it is often running when Lee is running.  Like Lee, the
		two miles of the West Fork of Cedar Cr. is a great afternoon play run.
		Thanks go to Charlie Stotts for information on this great play run.

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Clear Cr.

	Rating: II-III
	TDCR: 3333
	Location: Crawford Co.; Take Hwy 71 north of I-40 to the Hwy 282
		junction just north of Mountainburg.  Take Hwy 282 west to
		Chester.  Put in at the Hwy 282 bridge in Chester. (Park
		downstream river right just below the bridge.)  Take out at
		Ash St. low water bridge in Mountainburg (see Frog Bayou, S1
		for more info.) 
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Mountainburg
	Gradient: 30 - 40 fpm
	Length: 3 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: The USGS Frog Bayou gauge should be above 5 ft. for a 
		good run. Another good indicator is less than 1 ft. of airspace 
		under the Ash St. bridge.  If there is more than 1 ft. of water 
		over the bridge, the run will be dangerous due to extremely 
		heavy water on the Frog.
	Hazards: mostly strainers and some heavy water on the Frog.  Also
		beware of construction work for I-540 in several areas.
		At the time of this writing the creek passes through
		some culverts in three places and the areas are littered with
		rebar and other hazards.
	Description: The first two-thirds of this run is on Clear Cr.  The
		boating in this section is fast paced with many good class II+
		drops.  The first surfing opportunity comes immediately below
		the put-in bridge where enders are possible at high levels.
		Another spectacular surfing wave resides less than 1/2 mile
		down as the creek bends sharply to the left.  This portion
		of the creek is similar to Lee Cr., but it is much narrower.
		Beware of the areas near and under the three I-540 bridges, as
		these areas contain debris left over from highway construction.
		Also, beware of some protruding rebar on the river right side
		of a train trestle just below the third I-540 bridge.  Just
		downstream of this trestle, a ledge in the middle of a class
		II rapid provides a great spot for surfing and 360 spins.
		After the confluence with the Frog Bayou at the end of the 
		second mile, the character of the run changes completely.  The
		paddler is now on a full sized river, and the flow triples.
		Heavy class II+ water is encountered for the next 3/4 mile
		until the take-out is reached.  There are usually some bad
		strainers below the confluence, and the current can easily
		push an unprepared boater into them.  The run is fairly fast,
		usually requiring less than two hrs.  If you are more pressed
		for time, consider taking out or putting in at the upper I-540 
		bridge.  Take care not to trespass on the banks since most of 
		the land surrounding the creek is privately owned.  Boaters 
		should have very good boat control in class II-III rapids 
		before putting on Clear Cr.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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East Fork of the Little Buffalo

	Rating: III-IV (V)
	TDCR: 6857
	Location: Newton Co.  Put in is reached from a county road 2 miles
		southwest of Deer on Hwy 16.  Turn north on this road and 
		follow it for approx. 4 miles to a house.  ASK FOR PERMISSION
		TO ACCESS THE CREEK.  Drag your boat 1 mile down an old logging
		road to the creek.  Take out is reached by taking Shiloh
		Rd. east of Hwy. 21 just south of Mossville.  Drive for
		2 miles and take the right fork.  Descend a steep hill for
		4 miles to a wide low-water slab across the creek.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Swain, Murray
	Gradient: ???
	Length: 8 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Water should be flowing over the Buffalo R. low water 
		bridge at Ponca. Also, low water bridge at the take-out 
		should be under water for an optimal run. 
		LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)
	Hazards: strainers, Johnson's Squeeze (V)
	Description: The upper section of the EFLB, as it is locally known,
		is a classic Ozark creek run.  At the confluence of Barberry 
		Cr. the EFLB is a very small steep creek, but it picks up
		volume from three tributaries in the first mile and becomes
		a sizable creek run.  Half Moon (III) is the first 
		notable drop encountered followed by Johnson's Squeeze (V)
		where the creek is severely choked down.  Portage Johnson's
		Squeeze on the left, and beware of entering the upper part
		of the drop accidentally.  You may be forced to fight for
		your life in the Squeeze, as it's namesake, Jon Johnson, can
		attest to.  Although it certainly is not recommended, the 
		Squeeze has been a handfull of times with varying success.  
		The first runs were on the right at very high water 
		by Ryan Johnson (4/22/96), and then on the left crack side 
		(2/21/97) by Mr. Johnson as well.  Don't try this 
		at home boys and girls.  It's a definite hazard to life 
		and limb at any level.  Numerous class III and III+ rapids are 
		encountered below the Squeeze and some of the best scenery
		in the Ozarks surrounds padders in this stretch.  After this
		first gorge, the gradient relaxes a bit.  When the creek 
		looks like a blind jumble of boulders again, you're at the
		start of the class III-IV Second Gorge.  It starts with
		a mean hole with a twisting approach nicknamed "Obliterator"
		- a name often deserved at high levels when the hole
		tends to efficiently separate boaters and gear.  A rope
		here and a look at the lines are both good ideas.  Drops
		are continuous and blind for the next quarter mile,
		and at high water the area is basically one long class IV+
		rapid.  It's fun, but it's serious fun - there are sieves
		and hazards lurking in many places, so stay on your toes.
		After the Second Gorge, the gradient again eases, but
		class III drops keep appearing.  Just after a driveway
		crossing with a house and barn on the left, an easy class
		III drop leads to a short pool above "Swinging Bridge Drop."
		Just look for the old footbridge above the rapid.  This
		begins the Third Gorge, about the same intensity and length
		as the Second, but with a very different personality.
		The hardest drops come at the end, and don't relax too
		soon, because a class III+ drop with a brusing landing
		zone appears after you think the gorge is over (there
		is a sneak to the left).  There is a possible takeout
		point at a low water bridge about a mile below the
		Third Gorge, just past where Stepp Cr. enters from the
		left, or you can continue down to the Murray takeout.
		All boaters should have good creeking skills on
		class III-IV water before attempting the EFLB.  It's
		one of the best runs around if you have the skills,
		but it's a long a bruising day if you don't!
		Thanks to Shelby Johnson for information on this run.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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East Fork of the White R.

	Rating: II *
	TDCR: 1332
	Location: Madison County. Take Hwy 16 south from Durham, go approx.
		three miles, then the highway will curve to the left and go 
		uphill. At top of the hill will be a gravel road to the left.
		The road is easy to recognize because it cuts through an
		exposed layer of red clay.  Follow the road to the take-out
		(should be obvious).  The turn for the put-in is approximately
		1.75 miles down (South) of the highway from the turn-off for 
		the take-out. Cross over one bridge, go up a hill then across
		another drainage then take the first left on a gravel road.
		The road is marked by a stop sign.  Follow it to a bridge 
		which is the put-in.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Durham
	Gradient: less than 20 fpm
	Length: 1.75 mi.
	Season: FALL, SPRING
	Gauge: No real gauge, but the Mulberry should be relatively high 
		(> 4.5 ft.) for a good run.
	Hazards: Some strainers, bad hydraulics at high water levels
	Description: For some reason not many paddlers are aware of this run,
		probably because there are many more challenging runs up when
		this one is optimal.  However it is a great afternoon float 
		for paddlers near Fayetteville due to the short shuttle and 
		the large watershed above the run which maintains a floatable
		level for up to a week after a good rain.  It is a good
		training run for beginners, offering several chances to
		practice eddy hopping and ferrying.  When the river 
		begins to turn to the left and a tributary enters on the 
		right, the river channel begins to narrow signaling the 
		proximity of Flat Rock Rapid.  This rapid begins as a chute 
		flowing over a ledge that creates some nice surfing waves, 
		then it opens up and flows over sandstone bedrock creating 
		mucho surfing waves.  At the bottom of the rapid the bedrock
		ends and creates more waves and turbulence.  The short pool
		just past the trough is great for recovery. There is a short 
		class II- rapid just below Flat Rock Rapid, which, 
		unfortunately, signals the end of the run.  Paddle through a 
		long pool to the take-out.  Thanks to Steve Robertson for
		information on this run.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Fall Cr.

	Rating: II-IV
	TDCR: 5666
	Location:  Washington and Crawford Co.; Take Hwy 71 north from I-40 to
		West Fork, then take Hwy 170 south and then Hwy 265 west to
		Strickler.  Put in at Hwy 265 bridge at Strickler.  Take out
		at low water bridge on Hwy 220 (dirt road) south of Devil's
		Den State Park.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Strickler, Rudy NE
	Gradient: 50 fpm  (80 fpm. in first 2.5 miles)
	Length: 12 mi.
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: The bridge at the takeout near Lee Cr. should have water flowing
		over it for a minimal run.  More than 1.5 ft of water over 
		this bridge will make for a class IV run in the upper six 
		miles.  The USGS gauge for Baron Fork at Dutch Mills is also 
		a good predictor for this run.  It should be over 4.0 ft. for
		a run on Fall Cr.
		LINK TO USGS GAUGE
	Hazards: hydraulics, strainers, barbed wire (2 fences at end of 6th
		mile), undercuts
	Description: This creek was first run by Steve Robertson and crew in
		open boats in May 1995.  The lower 6 miles were run in Jan.
		1993 by Bill and Chanoy Herring.  The first 4 miles are the
		toughest, containing many class III+ drops in a very narrow
		stream bed.  "Threes with trees" is the best way to describe
		this dangerous stretch.  At high water there are very few eddies
		and no pools to recover in.  Some of the more notable rapids
		include Introduction (III) just below the put-in bridge,
		Poke in the Eye (III) about 2.5 miles into the run, and
		Hal's Falls (III) at mile 5.0 which sports a terminal, river-
		wide hydraulic at higher levels.  1/2 mile below Hal's Falls
		watch out for two mean strands of barbed wire that span the 
		creek.  The first fence appears at the end of a rapid where 
		water pillows off of several car sized rocks in the middle of 
		the stream.  It is best portaged on the right.  The second 
		fence follows about 1/4 mile after the first, just as a large
		overhanging bluff on river left ends.  Portage on the left.  
		These fences are extremely dangerous and difficult to spot 
		from upstream.  Also there are barbed wire strands in the
		creek between the two fences.  Stay near the left bank to
		avoid these strands.  Though it's tempting, do not attempt
		to cut or move these fences.  The landowner is within his
		rights to have them there, and he could cause major trouble
		for boaters if his property is destroyed.  Also beware of the 
		potential for strainers that can block the entire creek in 
		many places.  Plan on portaging at least a few times.  The 
		gradient lessens in the last half of the run providing more 
		time to recover, but there are still many trees in the fast 
		current so stay on your toes.  You may want to put on early, 
		because it can easily take you more than six hours to run the
		12 miles, and more time can easily be consumed unpinning 
		wayward boats and paddlers.  All boaters should be confident 
		on fast class III-IV water and familiar with strainer hazards
		before attempting Fall Cr. 

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Falling Water Cr.

	Rating: III
	TDCR: 4562
	Location: Pope and Searcy Co.; Take Hwy. 65 north of Conway from I-40
		and then Hwy. 16 west of Clinton to Ben Hur then north on NFR
		1205.  Numerous put-ins and take-outs availible off of NFR 1205.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Smyrna, Moore
	Gradient: 60+ fpm
	Length: 6 mi.
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: The gauge at Richland Cr. should be between 12 and
		0 inches of airspace.  You may also be able to determine the
		approximate level using the Buffalo R. river and rain gauges
		which are linked below.
		LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)
	Hazards: strainers, Falling Water Falls
	Description: A tributary to Richland Cr., Falling Water is a great
 		whitewater run in its own right. It's packed full of terrific 
		scenery and some great drops, most notably Falling Water Falls, 
		a sheer 10 footer 6 miles upstream of the Richland confluence.
		Much of the creek can be scouted from the road that parallels
		it 80% of the time.  The stream bed is extremely narrow in 
		the first 3 miles, and at high water the class III rapids
		tend to come at you very fast with few eddies to scout from.
		Watch out for the ever present deadfalls that can make you
		wish you'd worn some hiking boots.  While not as punishing as 
		Richland's gorge, Falling Water is more technical and all 
		boaters should be strong intermediates.  In high water,
		be an expert boater and hold onto your hat!

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Falls Branch

	Rating: III-V *
        TDCR: ???? 
        Location: Put-in: Go North on Hwy 123 at Lurton to Spence Junction.
                To the right is a dirt road which is the way to Richland.
                There is a large pond on the left (this is the headwaters
                to Falls Branch) Go North on Hwy 123 for ~1.25 miles to the
                next dirt road on the right. (Shulers Point) Go ~0.7 miles
                on this road to a parking area in front of a burmed road on
                the right. Drag South down the old roadbed to a field and
                then down from the left (East) edge of the field to the
                creek. Target is just above the junction of the two upper
                branches where the old roadbed crosses. (Elevation 1830)
                Reach the take-out by going back to Spence Junction and
                heading East on the dirt road. Take lefts at the two major
                intersections and head North on FR 1200 down the mountain
                toward Bass. Park on the side of the road near the low
                water bridge. (Elevation 890) The Shulers Point road does
                go down the hill to the confluence of Falls Branch and Cave
                Creek, but the FS gated it in the summer of 2001. But it
                could be used as an emergency access. 
        Topo Quad(s): Lurton
        Gradient: 150 fpm, (300+ fpm max)
        Length: 9 mi (4 on Falls Branch)
        Season: FLOOD
        Gauge: Gage at Richland Campground should to be above 6 or headed
                that way. Look for 1.5" or more rain at the Deer, Ben Hur
                and Mt. Judea rain gages, at the BNR Data Page. Rain must
                have fallen within the last 6 to 12 hours. If the Pond at
                Spence Junction is spilling lots of water, it should be a
                run! 
        Hazards: Undercut ledges and rocks, overhanging branches, strainers,
                waterfalls. 
        Description: First known descent was April 22, 1996. By Cowper
                Chadbourn, Chris Anderson, Howard Elliot, Walter Felton
                (OC-1), Bob Hoffman, Lance Jones, Nate Kline, Robert Orr,
                Ted Smethers and Billy Williams. Falls Branch is a
                4.5-mile run down to Cave Creek, with and average gradient
                of 150 ft/mile, the first mile being 300 ft/mile. Due to
                closure of the 4WD road to the confluence, an additional
                4-5 mile paddle to the community of Bass is required. The
                creek starts out on bedrock with a short slide followed by
                a 10-12 foot waterfall just below the confluence of the
                upper forks. There is a large rock in the left center of
                the drop and a narrow line to land in just right of
                center. Exit through one of two slots and over a 6-foot
                waterfall. Now get ready for lots of action with very
                tight slots and boulder jumbles. Little bedrock is
                encountered for the next 0.25 miles. Many of the boulder
                jumbles offer pin and undercut dangers compounded with
                possible wood. Note: the first run occurred after a series
                of wind storms resulting in a very large number of trees down
                across the creek. Portaging these trees was a major chore
                and led to the renaming of the creek by the paddlers as
                'Dead' Falls Branch. Most of the drops were run. Once the
                bedrock returns, have fun on the first couple of slides
                but be on the lookout for the point where the slide takes
                a sharp turn to the left in front of a large boulder. This
                is 'Nate's Falls'. The drop is entirely on bedrock, but
                two undercut boulders add some spice. Start with the
                entrance turn to the left followed by a tight turn to the
                right through a slot. The large boulder on the left bank
                is undercut and may collect wood. Main route is to exit
                far right and cut back left before dropping 10-12 feet
                through a tight slot requiring a hard turn back to the
                right. The crux is not pinning on the undercut boulder
                forming the right side of the slot. Optional route (water
                level and wood/debris dependent) is a straight line
                through a slot between the boulders and down through the
                final slot. Several more boulder jumbles and slides are
                encountered shortly, topped off by a slot move into a
                steep 12-15 foot slide drop into a grotto pool. Fast class
                II-III water takes you from the next mile or so from the
                tribuary on the right. Two small ledge drops signal the
                approach of 'Surprise Turn'. The creek takes a hard turn
                to the left as it drops between two boulders. As you enter
                the white foaming maelstrom, you think "This is going to
                be ugly!" But the foam is suprisingly forgiving and you
                shoot out with a big smile. Stay to the center/left and
                away from the undercut wall on the right and line up for
                the next 5-6ft drop. Fast boogie water takes you to the
                confluence with Cave Creek as the gradient starts to
                subside. 80-100 ft/mile gradient continues downstream to
                the takeout on FR 1200. Be aware of strainers and willow
                jungles in this section. A road parallels the creek if 
                needed for portaging. Like other micro-volume creeks, 
                meaningful ratings are difficult to establish on 
                the accepted International scale. At lower levels, the 
                creek may seem like a very technical class III, with 
                much rock bashing, scraping, and some portages. At higher
                levels, several rapids are expected to become solid 
                class V.  In any case, paddlers need to be very 
                familliar with the hazards of small, steep Arkansas
                creeks before attempting this run.  Thanks to Lance
                Jones for information about this great creek!

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Fern Gulley

	Rating: IV-V
        TDCR: 9895 
        Location: Take out on Little Mill Cr. at the low water slab.
                Put in is reached by heading north to Fern.  Go past
                Fern and turn off the pavement on the first gravel
                road to the south (this road has a stop sign on it).
                Follow the road downhill until the road does a couple
                of semi-switchbacks.  You'll have already passed
                one pretty good road to the right, and you're looking
                for the next one past the switchbacks.  If you go just
                past the road, you'll end up in a wide turn around where
                the hunters like to camp, so if you get there, turn
                back and take the first left.  Follow the steep little
                road downhill (4WD only!) until it switches back to the
                left at a small creek.  Go another 100 yards or so
                and look for the rock-lined trail going down to the
                right.  The creek put-in is about 30 yards down this
                trail.  If you don't have 4WD, park up at the main
                gravel road and walk down from there.  An alternate,
                but unpleasant, takeout if you're running short on
                time is to carry back up the old logging road that
                intersects the creek just past Rocket Slide.  
                (Actually there are old logging roads on the ridgetops
                on either side of the creek all the way down.)  This 
                road goes up through a split in the bluff and then into
                a clear cut.  Bear left and uphill and you can drag
                up to the put-in in about 45 minutes.  It's a heck of
                a climb though!
        Topo Quad(s): Mountainburg SE
        Gradient: 300 fpm (0.5 mi @ 400 fpm)
        Length: 4 mi (2.75 miles on Little Mill Cr.)
        Season: FLOOD
        Gauge: The Mulberry should be huge (10 feet) and rising on the USGS
                gauge at Mulberry to have a chance at Fern Gulley.  The
                watershed is small and the creek is full of rocks - it
                needs a lot of water to make a good run.  Little Mill 
                Cr. should almost be covering all of the concrete of 
                the slab at the takeout.  The best way to find out whether
                it will run or not is to drive to the put-in, walk 30 yards
                to the creek and check it.  Ideally, there should be enough
                water to form a rowdy looking hole at the base of the first 
                6-foot drop and the rocks in the main current should be
                mostly covered.  Unless it's raining, the water will be
                dropping fast, so take this into consideration before putting
                on at a really boney looking level.  If you just see lots
                of huge holes and no rocks, you probably should either wait
                for the water to drop or go find another creek!
        Hazards: Rapids are big, continuous, and dangerous.  This is no place
                for the unprepared.  Pins are possible almost everywhere.  Full-
                face helmets and elbow pads are an excellent idea. 
        Description: Fern Gulley is the name given to the East Fork of Little
                Mill Cr. by the local folks in Franklin Co.  This creek is 
                the jewel of steep creeking in the southern Ozarks.  When
                full of water, it is easily one of the most difficult creeks 
                in the state.  The creek features large, continuous drops with
                almost no really good eddies.  The run stays at a class IV 
                intensity level all the way, with no real breaks and some 
                notable class V interuptions.  The lack of good eddies makes
                it feel even steeper than its 300 fpm average gradient figure
                (if that's possible), throwing at paddlers a constant barage of 
                steep rapids that seem to blend into each other for long stretches.
                The creek begs for bank scouting at every turn, but since
                the water level tends to drop out quickly, you can't spend
                too much time on the banks.  A pre-run hike is very highly 
                recommended.  The first drop is called simply "The Test".  
                Those who fail to pass this class IV warm up, are urged 
                to consider walking back up to the car.  The next half 
                mile of water is exactly the same - and then it gets much
                tougher.  Somewhere in the first quarter mile is a drop 
                called "Rooster Poot" (IV).  This one looks like the rest, 
                but it ends in an ugly looking rooster tail.  Portage on the 
                right if you can get stopped and don't want to risk a pin, or
                try to angle right to avoid getting slammed into the rocks.  The 
                first class V is encountered about 1/3 mile from the put-in,
                just past the second major tributary stream cascading in on
                the left.  "Dumb and Dumber" is an ugly drop where the creek
                is split by a big rock.  The left side of this eight foot plunge 
                drops onto a roostertail rock and the right side dumps under a
                huge rock.  The approach is (as always) almost eddyless - 
                only boat what you can clearly see after Rooster Poot!  At
                Dumb and Dumber, go ahead and scout the next big class IV,
                "Whack-A-Yaker".  This is a big, twisting drop that dumps out
                under a tree at the end.  This one can mess with you - for
                some reason it doesn't run as cleanly as it looks.  The creek 
                lets up a bit at this point to a continuous class III slalom
                through trees.  When the creek turns back to the left, watch
                for a major tree jam that requires a portage.  Just past
                these trees the creek gets very serious, so you might as well
                stay on the banks and scout the next 200 yards.  This is the 
                start of "The Drop Zone", and you won't want to enter it blind.
                The left bank is really rocky, but it provides the best
                look at the drops.  The right bank is much easier for
                portaging boats.  The Drop Zone consists of a 200 yard
                long staircase of fast, tough drops and tricky holes
                that run headlong into each other creating a solid
                class V rapid.  There is no room for error when paddling 
                this rapid - this author can attest to the beating that 
                these drops can inflict upon those who are not on line!
                The Drop Zone can conceivably be broken down into four parts
                seperated by hard to catch eddies.  The first part is a long,
                multi-stage drop with plenty of rocks and holes.  You can
                then try to grab one of the small eddies - the last good
                ones you'll see for a while - on either bank to stop before
                part two of the Zone, known as "The Split".  This is a
                tough, pushy drop that is sometimes run to the left of
                the pillowing rock, pulling hard right at the end to line
                up for the three remaining ledge holes.  Another unstable
                eddy on the right preceeds part three - "Damned If You
                Do".  The creek twists left and drops about 10 feet
                into two big holes before shooting out over a couple
                of interesting looking drops around the corner.  A small,
                last chance eddy then appears just above the final
                plunge - "Big Juju".  Juju is a massive drop and the
                route is complex and dangerous.  A diagonal hole sits
                between the eddy and the most feasible route on the left,
                so expect it to kick you on the approach.  If you are one
                of the few who choose to test their luck in Juju, try to 
                precisely boof the first eight-foot drop to avoid the
                vertical pin on the left and the pin rocks in the middle of 
                the drop. Assuming you are still upright and moving forward 
                after you clear the first rocks, you will hopefully carry 
                enough speed into the final hole to escape from it.  If 
                you're determined to run the Drop Zone, set up bank support 
                in strategic locations and scout everything thoroughly. If 
                you think this is nice scenery but not runnable whitewater,
                carry your boat around it high on the right bank.  Below
                Juju, the class IV drops keep comming.  There are a couple
                of large trees down in this stretch as well, and they
                probably won't move anytime soon.  After three or four 
                tricky class IV drops that should generally be run to the
                right, a long slide starts.  It's a good idea to get out
                after the second drop below Juju and scout it, since
                a downed tree near the bottom would likely knock your head
                off your shoulders.  This one is nicknamed the "Rocket Slide",
                because you'll tend to launch into the air off of the
                vertical ledges in the middle of the slide.  Brace for
                the curler as you drop into the funneling plunge at the
                end, and don't forget to smile for the camera!  Rocket Slide
                is not that hard if you can avoid getting upside down (ouch!)
                or surfed in the hole at the bottom.  It's hard to believe
                that any hole will stop you when you're moving 25 miles per
                hour, but it is a possibility!  The next 400 yards of the
                creek is non-stop class III+ through trees.  If you haven't
                hiked out yet, you shouldn't have any trouble boat scouting 
                down this stretch.  It may look strange, but you'll finally see 
                a small pool up ahead.  Welcome to Little Mill Cr.  Stop and
                take a few breaths and get ready for nearly three more miles
                of powerful class III-IV drops before you reach the take-out.
                The first two major drops both feature big, sticky holes at
                this level, so stay on your toes.  If you run Fern Gulley at
                below optimal levels, you may not be too impressed by the rock
                bashing and sieve portaging.  Running it with too much water
                will force you into situations you don't want to be in.  
                The window for optimal levels is small, and even then, the 
                creek is no place for those who overestimate their skills. Hike 
                this one dry, and then follow someone who knows the creek if 
                you can.  Fern Gulley was first run on March 19, 2002 by 
                Otter (aka Jason Bertschy), Mike Echols, Rob Polan, Danny Smith,
                Nick Hobbs, "Crazy" Steve Brandenbura, and Fish (aka Bill 
                Herring), and they have the pictures to prove it! 

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Fishers Ford (Illinois R.)

	Rating: I
	TDCR: 1111
	Location: The playspot is on the Illinois R. south of Siloam Springs. 
		Follow Hwy 16 West toward Siloam and turn on Hwy 244 West a short
		time after you pass Lake Wedington.  Follow 244 for a couple of 
		miles or so and take Cincinati Cr. Rd., a gravel road, to the north.
		You can look for the old, white "Nicodemus Church" sign that is 
		mostly hidden by bushes at this turnoff.  The Hwy 244 bridge 
		over Cincinati Cr., a medium sized creekbed with a gravel bottom,
		is just past the turn you need to make, so if you cross it, you've
		gone a bit too far.  If you reach Hwy 59, you've gone a little over
		a mile too far.  Follow the gravel road north about a mile, and
		you'll come to an intersection.  Go straight on what is now
		Fishers Ford Rd.  The road makes a few bends, but just keep
		following it north toward the river.  When you come to the
		old metal bridge, park on the river left, upstream of the bridge
		and be sure to pull off the road.  Don't block the little road
		leading down to the river by the bridge, since local fishermen
		use it to lauch johnboats.  Unload and walk down to the river
		and put in and paddle down about 100 yards to the ledge.  When
		you're finished playing, either paddle or walk back up the
		streambed to get back to the bridge.  Please respect landowners'
		rights around this spot, and DON'T TRESPASS on the river banks
		at the ledge, which are clearly posted.  Ask permission
		from the landowner in advance if you want to walk through
		the field to reach the playspot.  It's a long URL, and it
		may change, but you can follow this link to get a
		MapBlast map of the area.  Zoom out on it to see how to come in
		from Fayetteville or other towns.
	Topo Quad(s): N/A
	Gradient: N/A (just one rapid)
	Length: N/A (100 yards to the rapid)
	Season: ALL
	Gauge: The USGS gauge on the Illinois R. at Siloam Springs should
		be higher than 3.0 feet - but it always is.  If the gauge is
		over 5.0 feet, the river is flooding and the water quality
		is about as bad as you can imagine.  Due to heavy agricultural
		runoff, it's best to wait a couple of days after heavy rains 
		before venturing out into the Illinois R.
	Hazards:  None.  A big pool will catch wayward boaters at all but
		the highest levels.
	Description: This is the only summertime play spot for Northwest
		Arkansas.  If you don't go expecting a big rapid, you won't
		be disappointed.  But it is the only game in town in the dry
		summer months, and the water is never to low to have some fun
		and get a workout.  It's actually a great spot for beginners
		to hone their skills and practice rolls, ferries, catching
		eddies, surfing, etc.  It's about the least threatening
		rapid in the state.  The wave/hole varies with natural water
		flow.  At lower levels, a small wave and some decent squirt
		lines are the attractions.  With more water, a small hole forms
		that can be side surfed.  With even more water a larger 
		wave/hole appears and the well defined eddy lines vanish.
		At the highest water levels, there is still a wave, but
		the rapid is an e-coli mixing vat, due to a large amount
		of agricultural waste runoff following heavy rains.  Be sure
		to carry or paddle back up the streambed to the bridge
		when you're finished playing.  The local landowners like
		their privacy, and have posted the fields around the river.
		Some will give you permission to cross the fields if you
		ask in advance, but if you don't have permission, they're
		probably not going to be happy when they catch you.  Please
		help promote good relationships with local landowners by
		not blocking roads or paths with your vehicle and by
		not trespassing on streamside property.

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Frog Bayou

	Rating: II
	TDCR: 2214
	Location: Crawford Co.;
		S1: Put in at Ash St. low water bridge in Mountainburg;
			Take out at Silver Bridge at Hwy. 282 south of
			Mountainburg.
		S2: Take out at Grotto (next Hwy. 282 low water bridge south
			of Mountainburg.
		S3: Take out at Lancaster low water bridge (next low water
			bridge going south of Grotto).
		S4: Take out at Hwy. 282 bridge at Rudy.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Mountainburg, Mountainburg SW, Rudy
	Gradient: less than 20 fpm
	Length: S1: 3.5 mi.
		S2: 6.5 mi.
		S3: 3.5 mi.
		S4: 8 mi.
	Season: FALL, SPRING
	Gauge: Look for the USGS gauge at Rudy
		to be between 2.7 and 5.0 feet for a good run.
	Hazards: watch out for downed trees and strainers
	Description: The Frog is an excellent class II run in the southern
		Ozarks.  The river stays at a runnable level for much of the fall 
		and spring and features a steady diet of class II and II+ drops 
		that will challenge beginning boaters.  All of the sections from
		Mountainburg down have some great rapids and all have the
		potential for tree strainers to fall into the river, so watch
		out for those hazards.  The banks of the Frog are almost all
		private property, so treat the land and landowners with respect.
		At high water levels, the Frog can be run above L. Fort Smith,
		and Clear Cr. is another challenging high water option, but
		such runs are relatively rare.  The stream can also be run below
		Rudy, where it is a slower class I-II float.  The section that
		draws the most boaters is the section from Lancaster low water
		bridge to Rudy (sometimes called the "Ribbit Run").  The class 
		II rapids in this stretch are long, twisting, and closely 
		spaced, making it one of the best stretches of beginner-
		intermediate paddling in the state.  Also, at most levels 
		surfing and play opportunities for advanced paddlers abound.
		The first ledge below the Lancaster put-in is a great 
		surfing spot where paddlers tend to wear themselves out
		before they even start the run.  Waterfall Drop is just around
		the corner, a good example of the surprisingly beautiful scenery
		on this part of the creek.  When a bluff bends the river back
		to the left, watch for a series of fast rapids finishing with
		"The Pourover".  Powerful cross currents, rocks, and holes
		make the rapid a challenging class II+ run at most levels and
		kayakers can get vertical in the two pourover spots at lower
		levels (between 2.9 and 3.3 feet is best for the upper
		rock and 3.5 - 3.8 is good for the lower one).  Railroad
		Trestle #1 just downstream features very friendly surfing 
		waves and holes at all but the highest levels.  Plenty more
		good rapids follow: Five Eddies, Railroad Trestle #2, Rapid 
		Transit, Squirter's Eddy, and finally Canyon Rapids
		(aka "Invisible Rock").  This last one is less than a half-mile 
		from the takeout in Rudy, and it features one of the
		most difficult to see pourover rocks in the state.  Most
		of the action can be missed by staying far left, and the
		run down the right side is for would-be heros only!  Don't 
		let the "Bayou" in the name fool you - the Frog is as good a
		class II whitewater run as you will find!

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Galla Creek

	Rating: III-IV *
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Pope Co., The close proximity to I-40 and 4 mi. shuttle 
		make this one of the easiest creek shuttles in Arkansas. 
		Go north off I-40 (exit 88) at Pottsville (just East of 
		Russellville) on Crow Mtn. Rd. (Hwy. 363). Proceed up the
		mountain 2.3 mi. The Bridge is unmarked but would be hard
		to miss. There is not a lot of parking so plan accordingly.
		Take out at Galla Lake by going back down the mountain and
		turning west on Hwy. 64 into Pottsville. Go 1 mi., then 
		turn north and follow Galla Park Rd. to the lake.  The park 
		gates close at 4:30p.m.  Alternative take out would require 
		a carry around the dam and a short paddle in the dam outflow 
		to I-40/Hwy.64.  Galla Creek can be run in 1.5 to 2 hours
		including shuttle.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Russellville East 
	Gradient: 92 fpm (last mile before lake drops 140 fpm) 
	Length: 3.15 mi. (last .75 mi on the lake)
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: No gauge. Generally would require at least 2.5 in. of rain in
		Russellville. If there appears to be enough water at the
		put-in, there should adequate water downstream because there
		are several small branches that enter downstream.
	Hazards: The major hazards are trees.  Several of the rapids require
		maneuvering thru trees in class III situations.  Some of the
		drops are semi-blind with slots. Deadfalls are common. 
	Description: Galla Cr. was first run in April 1992 by Charles Chevaillier 
		and Bob Silkensen and then again in May 1995 after a 4 inch rain
		by David Wilbanks and Dale Barton of the Russellville area. 
		The second run was in November 1996 after a 2.8in. rain. 
		The total drop is 220 ft.  The initial 2/3 mi. drops 60 ft.
		and is mainly characterized by fast water through trees, but
		the visibility downstream is fairly good.  At one point the
		creek bends left and under a tree which has grown from the
		left bank onto a rock in the middle of the bend; portage on
		the left.  The next mile drops 140 ft and is very similar to 
		a smaller, steeper Richland Creek with trees.  The canyon
		gets noticeably deeper and several waterfalls and small
		streams enter.  It is difficult to believe that you are only
		about a half mile from the interstate!  There are several
		class III rapids in this section and a couple of IV's.  One
		(Boof Lube) has a tricky class III entry, followed by a
		tight line right through some trees, over a small hole, slide
		left, and a quick 7 ft. boof right into poorly padded,
		fast water (whew!). The bottom portion of the creek still has
		several class III drops and a few require some must make
		slot moves.  The action only stops at the lake.  Thanks 
		go to Dale Barton for the description of this great little
		creek run!

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Graves Cr.

	Rating: III+ (IV+) *
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Pope County;  From Hwy 7, take Hwy 164 to Twin Bridges 
		(Moore Outdoors), cross Big Piney, and turn right 
		on 1800 (Pilot Rock Road).  Turn right again on 1800A.
		When road changes from graded gravel to "4WD", continue down
		hill to just past the first hairpin; park and drag boat
		downhill about 1/2 mile going due West.  Goal is the where
		two forks of the creek join at about Elevation 790 feet.  Two
		options exist for take out; either continue down this same
		road until you first see Graves Creek (take out #1), or 
		take out at Long Pool on the Big Piney (take out #2).
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Treat
	Gradient: 106 fpm (not counting Big Piney)
	Length: 1.9 mi (plus 5.4 miles if you go to Long Pool)
	Season: RAIN
 	Gauge: Can't be gauged by comparison to Piney.  Has been
		run both with Piney at 4 ft and with Piney above 17 ft.
		Look for about 1.5" or more of rain within the last 6 to 12
		hours.  Rain gage exists at Twin Bridges; can be accessed via
		ACC Bulletin Board.
	Hazards: numerous strainers, undercuts (especially in one small box 
		canyon) 
	Description:  The lower section (below Take out #1) was probably
		first run years ago by Kerry Moore, Dale Barton, and/or other
		locals, and has been used by Kerry as an alternate put-in for
		rescue work on the Big Piney run.  The first known run of the 
		upper section was Nov. 5, 1994, by a small army consisting of 
		Paul Caldwell, Cowper Chadbourn, Nathan Kline, Chris Jones, 
		Jim McDaniel, Paul Newton (OC-1), Ted Smethers, and David 
		Wilbanks.  This run is worth doing for the scenery alone, 
		with many beautiful waterfalls coming in from either side, 
		including a very spectacular one at "Amphitheater".  The 
		gradient is generally evenly distributed along the 
		run, with one notable exception at "Amphitheater".  Just 
		after you run the first 8 foot waterfall, beware
		The next drop after this waterfall contains a hidden
		shelf rock and a nasty undercut rock/bluff, and as of late
		1995 had only been run one time at a lower level (by Nathan).
		All boaters should be confident on steep class III+ water, or
		you should opt for a run on the Piney instead.  Thanks go to
		Copwer Chadbourn for information on this run.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Hailstone Cr. (A.K.A. Big Buffalo Cr.)

	Rating: II to III+
	TDCR: 4548
	Location: Newton Co.; put in at NFR 1463 crossing 1.2 mi N. of
 		Fallsville on Hwy 21; take out at the Hwy 21 bridge over the
		Buffalo R. at Boxley, AR
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Fallsville, Boxley
	Gradient: 40 fpm
	Length: 14 mi.
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: 10 in airspace to 1.5 ft. over the low water bridge over the
		Buffalo R. at Ponca AR.  Call BOC at 1-800-221-5514 for a
		reading.  (Rating is a solid III+ at levels over 1 foot over
		the Ponca bridge.)  You can also predict the levels using
		the Buffalo R. river and rain gauges which are linked below.
		LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)		
	Hazards: strainers, remoteness and length of run
	Description: This is the major tributary to the upper Buffalo R.  It
		is possibly the ultimate Arkansas wilderness run.  14 miles of
		nothing but you, the river, and the mountains.  The rating
		easily goes up several notches in high water.  The remoteness
		of the creek makes rescue a very difficult proposition, but
		mistakes can easily result in damaged equipment or people.
		Be sure you have lots of time to make it to the takeout.
		It often takes more than six hours to run the 14 miles.  One
		particularly dangerous spot occurs about halfway down the run.
		A class II rapid leads into an undercut cave on the left bank,
		and a significant portion of the river disappears into this cave.
		There have been some close calls at this spot where boaters
		have been swept into the cave and gotten stuck on debris.
		At high water this cave could be a killer.  Watch for it,
		and scout anything you can't see until you get past this
		point.  Make sure you have solid intermediate whitewater skills 
		and plenty of experience on other Ozark creeks before 
		attempting the Hailstone.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Hart Cr.

	Rating: III-IV (V)
	TDCR: 8785
	Location: The take-out is at the popular Hwy 220 bridge over Lee Cr.
		(the put-in for section 2 of Lee). To get to the put-in
		take Hwy 220 south (the paved side) until you almost reach
		the top of the hill. Turn off on the first major dirt road
		to the left. This is the road that goes from Hwy. 220 to
		Chester and Hwy. 71. Follow this road for approx. 4 mi. until
		it parallels the Hart Cr. drainage. There is a large clear
		cut on the left that is barely visible from the road. It is
		easiest to hike down to the creek on the west side of
		the clear cut (left if you are on the road facing the
		creek). There are a few small turnouts on the side of the
		road opposite the creek that are good for parking. Be
		careful not to block any of the small dirt roads. Make sure
		that you carry down near the clear cut area, because the
		land there is owned by the USFS. All surrounding land is
		private. Another way to determine the proper location is to
		drive all the way to the first four way intersection. When
		you get there, turn around and drive about a mile back
		toward Lee before carrying down. The carry is a short, steep
		brushwhack that will take about 15 min.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Rudy NE
	Gradient: 200 fpm (1/2 mile @ 300 fpm)
	Length: 4 mi. (counting 2.25 miles on Lee Cr.)
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Recent (within a few hours) and heavy (2+ inches) rains are
		a must for a good run.  There are two ways to try to estimate
		the flow on Hart Cr.  Neither is particularly accurate. Lee
		Cr. should probably be reaching flood stage (about 12+ ft). 
		Also, Clear Cr. and its tributary McCaslin Br. near Chester
		should be very big and muddy. The only way to really be sure
		is to hike to the put-in. The put-in can look a little low and
		you'll still have a good run. If you can't boat at all at the
		put-in, the run will be too bony. 
	Hazards: barbed wire fence (2/3 mile into the run), severe undercuts,
		boulder sieves, dangerous rapids, trees, trees, and more trees
	Description: The creek was first run 2/27/97 by a small determined group
		of paddlers including Noah Fraiser, Kevin Fendley, and
		Bill Herring. The level for the first run was quite low,
		but all rapids were successfully completed (with much
		scooting and dragging in the first 1/2 mile). A second run
		at a much higher level was made in January of 1998 by Bill
		Herring and Noah Fraiser. The creek starts out as an
		extremely small stream, even by Ozark standards. The first
		3/4 mile consists of non-stop, straightforward class III-
		action in a 10 to 15 ft. stream bed. Much of this stretch
		is surprisingly clear of trees, but there are a few
		nasty strainers so stay alert. Many times the creek is
		tightly constricted (5 to 10 ft) for long stretches. This
		is fast, heads-up boating with little chance of catching
		eddies. Fortunately, the water is usually shallow and not
		very pushy. About 2/3 mile into the run you will drop into
		a very narrow bedrock sluice followed by a large island. Pull
		out at the top of this island to carry across the barbed
		wire strands at the end of the island. The current is fast
		under this fence, and the approach is devoid of good
		eddies, so be sure to get stopped in time. After this
		point you are on private land, so treat the land with
		respect (and please don't even think about cutting the
		fence!). A short distance past the fence, a large
		tributary enters from the right. The flow is doubled and
		begins to get quite pushy. The first big class III below
		this tributary (named Pacemaker) marks the start of the
		hard stuff. In the next 1/2 mile all hell breaks loose as
		the creek plunges continuously around, over, and through
		large boulders as it drops 150 ft. After a brief warm up
		you'll run into Hart Attack, a big class V jumble that
		blocks all downstream visibility. This rapid has been run,
		but the landing is extremely cluttered. If you choose to
		run it, try to angle from left to right to avoid a 
		vertical pin on the left. The current pushes to the right
		at the top of the drop, so use this to your advantage.
		If you choose to walk it, drag up and over the left bank.
		Hart Attack is immediately followed by a series of tricky
		ledges, nicknamed Defibrillator, that lead into a blind,
		class IV- sluice called Nitro. This one is impressive at
		almost any water level, but, if the water is high, it will
		be the most memorable rapid on the creek.  The creek is
		funneled down a narrow chute on the left until it plunges
		six feet into a shallow pool. It's hard to stay in control
		comming out of Nitro, but you need to regain your composure
		quickly because you'll be flushed through some class III
		ledges below it before the creek slows down. The next 1/2
		mile is non-stop class III+ action. You may find yourself
		moving too fast in the narrow stream with no way to slow
		down. Scout as frequently as you can to avoid getting
		buried under one of the undercuts or strainers that occur
		frequently in this stretch. The individual rapids are not
		too nasty, but with a lot of water, it's hard to slow down
		and run the complex class III drops one at a time.  After
		you come out of the hairy stuff, you still need to be on
		your toes for the 1/2 mile paddle to Lee Cr. The creek splits
		in a few places, but staying to the right should keep you
		in the clearer part of the stream. Once you hit Lee Cr., 
		you're in for some big water. Watch for some big hydraulics
		(particularly a class V river-wide ledge just below the 
		Hart Cr. confluence that can be skirted on the far left) and 
		one very bad willow jungle before you reach the 220 bridge. 
		Hart is a tough run, but it is mercifully short. Still, give
		yourself three or more hours to allow for a lot of time to
		be consumed by scouting, portaging, and unpinning boats.
		Also, take extra gear and a saw if you can. The gorge is
		extremely hard on equipment (a broken paddle resulted from
		the first run) as well as bodies. Obviously this is an
		experts-only creek run, and even the experts would be well
		advised to check it out on foot before attempting it in a
		boat.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Haw Creek

	Rating: II+-III *
	TDCR: 4450
	Location: Put in below Bowman creek or anywhere along road. Bowman
		creek comes into Haw creek about 2.5 miles from Haw creek
		campground. It enters on river right. You can see Bowman
		creek on the left as you drive up highway 123. Take out-
		Haw creek campground crossing, or any spot along the creek.
	Topo Quad(s): Rosetta, Ft. Douglas
	Gradient: 48 fpm
	Length: 2.5 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Piney, Richland, Hailstone, little piney should all be in
		flood. There should be over 3 inches of rain at Deer in the
		past 48 hrs for a good run. At the campground, the crossing
		marks should have water one ft from the top for an optimal
		run. Above that, the creek will get pushier, faster and
		less room for error exists. You can see if thereís enough
		water by just looking at the creek. 
	Hazards: log jams, blind drops, ledges and holes to avoid
	Description: This run would be good for boaters comfortable on Falling
		Water Cr. or Lower Richland.  It is a small creek with
		good water volume, good ferrying, eddying hopping, and
		water reading skills are a must.  When all the creeks are
		in flood, Haw Cr. is a good choice for intermediate
		boaters.  It is short, close to the road, and can be 
		scouted easily.  Normally a class II+ to III run, if 
		the creek is really pumping, then all bets are off. 
		Across the road from Bowman creek, you can brush crash 
		to a nice little ledge to put in.  The creek could be run 
		father up, but it gets tighter and bonier.  Below the 
		put-in are a couple of ledges that should be run to 
		the right. Most of the rapids are best run far right or 
		far left.  There are a number of ledges with holes below 
		them.  Soon you'll find a double ledge that should be 
		run to the left over the first and then ferried right 
		over the second.  Below this, there is a sharp ledge 
		across the entire creek.  Run it to the far right.  You 
		will see a shale rock sticking up on to a tree in the 
		water below the ledge. We ran to the right of it. 
		There is another hole below that can be skirted on far
		right or left.  Left seems to have less brush.  By now the
		road will be rising to river right with a noticeable
		cliff face.  There is a waterfall on the right off of 
		the shale bluff.  Enter the rapid here to the left and work
		down.  After the water fall, there is a class II+ drop that
		should be scouted.  The creek is split by a tree with a
		ledge.  Run to the left, follow the tongue, and move right
		to avoid the flat rock below.  There is some more good stuff
		below, but eventually youíll get to a flat spot where the
		creek splits into two channels.  You should also see the
		road again.  Take the right channel, work down and go under
		the bridge to the right. There is another ledge and hole below
		the bridge - it can be run to the far right. The channel squeezes 
		in again here and thereís willows, so be on your toes. 
		A significant double drop/hole known as "Small Juju" 
		can be run to the far right.  Go right before the boulder
		in the middle of the channel and hug the right bank.  Or
		run left into the holes if you dare!  From this
		point, itís about 50 yds to the confluence of Gee Creek.
		Gee creek should double the volume of the water.  From here
		on out, it rocks and rolls! A few yards below Gee creek,
		thereís a good wave series with a hole at the bottom. Run
		to the left to avoid the hole.  You should see the
		campground crossing soon below.  Below the campground crossing
		thereís a long rapid that looks like a flume.  You
		should see the campground to your right below this.  Haw
		Creek Falls is next.  At an optimal level, the drops can be
		run to the right to avoid the second drop.  At higher
		levels, who knows?  Once you come around the left bend, 
		you will be entering "Big Juju" (IV? V?). This rapid is a 
		sight to behold!  Thereís a sharp diagonal ledge
		at the top, immediately followed by a mushroom rock below
		it.  The most obvious route looks like river left but
		there is a tree with a root stob sticking out in the middle
		of that line. Far right looks better, but any line is iffy! 
		You can scout this rapid from the road as there is
		a campsite with a pulloff next to it.  Above Big Juju, 
		there are few eddies, but you can recognize it 
		when the current picks up, the channel straightens and 
		constricts, and you pass a triangular rock in the middle 
		of the creek.  Good Luck!  Below this, the creek follows 
		the road and then ducks below a bridge before entering 
		the Piney. Beware of the bridge!  Thanks to T. Yamashita
		for information on this run!

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West Fork Of Horsehead Cr.

	Rating: III-IV+
	TDCR: 8897
	Location: To reach the take-out take Hwy 164 North from I-40
		(exit 47) and drive approx. 3 miles north to Horsehead Lake.
		Cross over Horsehead Cr. and take the next left which will
		take you around the East side of the lake.  Bear to your
		left (stay near the lake) and you'll eventually come to
		a low water slab that is under water (hopefully!).  This
		is the Main Fork of Horsehead Cr.  Since you can't drive
		across this creek (assuming the water is high enough to
		boat), park here and drag your boat 1/2 mile over to this
		spot from the West Fork of Horsehead when you take out.  
		Or you can paddle out on the lake if you want to.  It's about
		50/50 on effort either way.  To get to the put-in, go back
		around the lake (the way you came) and take a right on 164.
		Once you cross over Horsehead Cr., take the second dirt road
		to the right (North).  Bear right at the only major intersection
		and you'll start heading way uphill until you get to the
		small community of White Oak.  At White Oak the road T's
		into County Road 30.  Turn right (North) on CR 30 and
		follow it for a few miles through Oak Grove to Batson.
		Take the first road to the right (South) just past the
		Batson church.  Follow this road for 3/4 mile until you
		see a small trailer in the corner of a field on your right.
		Turn right on the small road just past this trailer.  This
		is labeled FR 1445A on Ozark National Forest maps.  Bear
		left on this road past a road that splits off to the right.
		After another 1/8 mile, you'll see a small turnout on the
		right that you can park at.  Park there and brushwhack
		1/4 mile and 300 vertical feet down to the creek.  Bringing
		some climbing ropes and harnesses is not a bad idea at all.
		You're aiming for aprox. elevation 1500 feet on the creek.
		Good luck!
	Topo Quad(s): N/A
	Gradient: 160 fpm avg. (1 mi @ 420 fpm)
	Length: 5 mi
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Very heavy rains (3+ inches) in the Clarksville and Ozark
		areas are needed to bring the creek up to a runnable level.
		The creek is best gauged by driving to the Middle Fork of
		Horsehead Cr. (the takeout). The ends of the concrete slab
		should be at least a few inches under water for a good run.
		A gauge reading of 9 feet or higher on Spadra Cr. may also be
		an indication of enough water on Horsehead Cr.
	Hazards: Numerous trees, numerous undercut rocks and ledges
		(especially at the Teacup), and fast, blind approaches to
		big waterfalls
	Description: This run was first explored by Steve "Dog"
		Robertson, Dave "The Grey Ghost" Reid, and Bill
		"Fish" Herring on 5/13/1999. The character of
		this run can be summed up in one word: waterfalls. There
		are many of them of all shapes and sizes on the creek, and
		all of them are runnable under the right conditions. The
		run starts off with an incredibly steep brushwhack
		downhill to reach the put-in on the edge of the National
		Forest boundary. Once you reach the bottom (not an easy
		task) you'll find an old roadbed that leads up away from
		the creek on the left side. From this put-in, the creek
		slides and tumbles through a nearly solid sheet of rock as
		it descends at over 400 fpm through a very narrow, steep-walled
		gorge. The beauty of the gorge is incredible, but getting out
		of it requires ropes and climbing skills in many places. The
		rapids are almost all low angle slides with some rocks
		stuck in them. In fact the whole creek is really just a
		natural waterslide. While this is fun in the lesser
		rapids, it creates long, eddy-less approaches to the
		bigger drops. None of the major drops can be seen clearly
		before you are committed to them. Very frequent scouting
		is an absolute nescessity, and a good hike beforehand at
		low levels is a must as well. The bigger drops start
		with Gooseneck, a long sliding approach followed by a 10
		foot drop into a very small grotto. The hydraulic at the
		base of the last plunge may be inescapable at high water.
		Lots of fast action and trees bring you to another large
		sluice/fall combination which is a lot of fun unless there
		is a tree down in it. A scout past the next major horizon
		line reveals one of the most dangerous rapids on the run. 
		The "Teacup O' Death" consists of three 
		consecutive four foot ledges with the second ledge emptying 
		into a huge undercut. The portage is easiest on the right 
		bank. If you put in just past the Teacup, you'll be running
		a fast runnout stretch that features some jagged looking
		undercut bluffs. Just past these a big feeder pours in
		from the right. Stop immediately at this feeder and scout
		ahead to the next big fall (it's almost a certainty that
		you'll get swept over the fall if you get within 50 yards
		of it). This fall drops about 15 feet into a shallow pool.
		The water right below the lip of the drop is quite
		shallow, but the center of the pool is a few feet deep.
		It's a very iffy drop, and the portage to the pool below
		it requires a rappel (be sure to bring a good rope!). Test
		the pool very carefully if you're thinking about running
		this one. A lot of fast, sliding drops follow this big
		fall. Only run when you're sure you can cleanly catch the
		next eddy. Flying Dog Falls, a potentially bruising 20+
		footer, is somewhere in this stretch, and if you get
		closer than 50 yards to it you'll be running it blind. You
		can't see the horizon line from the start of the entrance
		rapid, so be very careful! Flying Dog has a 5 foot deep
		pool, and it will tend to launch you into a nearly flat
		boof because of the small step right above the big drop.
		Is it worse to try to pencil down into really shallow
		water, or to land flat and potentially compress your
		spinal column? If you don't want to try to find the answer
		to that question there's a really easy portage just to the
		left of the fall. There are a bunch of fun rapids below
		Flying Dog as well as a few bad trees. After another half
		mile or so, you'll pick up a lot more volume from some
		feeders and the gradient will ease off somewhat. The
		balance of the run is very fast and fun class II+ to III
		water. There are several nice ledges and slides on the
		lower part of the creek, and a few undercut spots that can
		take your head off if you get too complacent. If you take
		out on the lake, be sure not to paddle over the spillway
		at the far end. This monster has been run at certain
		levels, but it's definitely not a healthy thing to do.
		West Horsehead is obviously a potentially dangerous creek
		that requires a very high level of commitment. It's
		incredibly difficult to get out of the gorge once you're
		in it. Portages and scouting are best done in many places
		with the help of good climbing ropes. At medium to high
		levels, the countless sluices, slides and falls don't
		provide many eddies at all. There aren't that many really bad
		drops, but the few that are there are huge and very dangerous.
		No matter how good you are, you'll be swept into them
		if you don't know exactly where they are. Be very sure you know 
		what you're getting into before you carry down to the creek!

See the Photo Gallery for photos

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Hurricane Cr. (Franklin Co.)

	Rating: II+
	TDCR: 2341
	Location: Franklin Co.; Take Hwy. 215 north from I-40 near Mulberry
		until you get to Shores Lake.  Go south of Shores L. and
		put-in at low water bridge below the dam.  Take out 1 mile
		downstream on gravel road on river right or float to
		Hwy. 215 take out for Mulberry R.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Bidville, Cravens, Mountainburg SE
	Gradient: 40 fpm
	Length: 1 mi. (or 9 mi. if you float the Mulberry too)
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: The Mulberry R. gauge (501-324-5150) should be over 6 ft.
	Hazards: no major ones
	Description:  Hurricane Cr. is a good warmup or chaser for Spirits
		Cr. that is located just to the east.  It is also a good
		run to catch in the afternoons after a busy work day.  The
		rapids are nearly continuous class II, and the first one
		is a 3-4 ft. ledge that can be surfed.  There are several good
		surfing opportunities, and the end of the run provides good
		eddies for squirting.  If you're only going one mile, you can
		walk the shuttle in 15 minutes and run the creek again.  Just
		make sure you don't miss the take out; the next one is eight
		miles downstream!

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Hurricane Cr. (Newton & Pope Co.)

 Rating: II+-III *
    TDCR: 3345
    Location: Take out is reached from I-40 by taking Hwy 7 north to
       Pelsor. Go west on Hwy 123 for about 10 or 11 miles. Take a
       right on a dirt road just before crossing the Ft. Douglas
       Bridge over the Big Piney Creek. Go about 1.5 miles to the
       Hurricane Creek take out at a low water crossing. (This is
       just upstream from the confluence with the Big Piney.) Put
       in is reached by back tracking on Hwy 123 to Hwy 7. Go
       north 7 to 9 miles. Look for the "Who'd A Thought It" gift
       shop on the left. Take the dirt road just to the left of
       the gift shop. Soon you will come to a fork. Veer right
       and continue down hill 3 or 4 miles. After you get to the
       bottom of the valley you will come to another fork. 
       Veer right for another 1/2 mile to the put on Cub Creek 
       just a few hundred yards upstream of Hurricane Cr.
    Topo Quad(s): Chancel, Ft. Douglas
    Gradient: ?? fpm
    Length: 9 mi.?
    Season: RAIN
    Gauge: Reportedly this run can be done when the Piney is at 5
       feet. It can certainly be done when the Piney is about 6
       feet and Richland Cr. is running at least 3 feet. 
       6 - 7 feet on the Piney is better and 4 feet on Richland 
       would be even better.
    Hazards:  Strainers are the main hazard. Often there are
       downed trees that must be portaged or avoided.
    Description: This stream is a good choice for intermediate to
       advanced paddlers who may not be interested in Richland Cr. 
       or harder runs. The first few miles are similar to the Big
       Piney and the second 1/2 is more like Falling Water Creek
       or maybe even lower Richland. The scenery is A+;
       waterfalls entering the creek are numerous! Strainers are
       the most obvious hazard to contend with and there are usually
       a few downed trees that need to be portaged. The pace is good 
       for the first mile or so with challenging class II rapids. The
       creek then slows down for a few miles before the mountains
       squeeze the creek bed into a good class III jewel. Watch
       for "Uh Oh"! rapid a nice class III boulder garden about 3
       miles upstream of the takeout. The line is somewhat
       difficult to see until you enter the drop. It is
       reminiscent of some of the drops on Section III of the
       Chattooga. ("Uh Oh" was the loud response from Gordon
       Kumpuris when boat scouting it for the first time.) Run
       it left to right.  Thanks go to Gordon Kumpuris for
       information about this great Ozark run!

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Illinois Bayou

	Rating: II
	TDCR: 2324
	Location:
		S1: (Snow creek run) Take Hwy 7 north from I-40 at 
		  Russellville, and then take Hwy 27 in Dover towards 
		  Hector.  Turn left at Hwy 105 (Hwy 105 turns back into 
		  Hwy 27 at Hector) go through Hector to the second bridge 
		  that crosses the Bayou and turn left on to the dirt road 
		  just prior to driving over the bridge.  Put in were Snow
		  Cr. enters the Bayou.
		S2: (Hector bridge to bridge run) Put in at the second 
		  bridge past Hector and take out at the next bridge just 
		  outside of Hector.
	Topo Quad(s): N/A
	Gradient: 20 fpm
	Length:	S1: 2 mi.
		S2: 5 mi.
	Season: SPRING and FALL
	Gauge: The USGS gauge at Scottsville should be between 6 and 8 
		feet for a good run.  Advanced boaters can enjoy big water 
		at levels over 8 feet, but the creek is much more hazardous.
		LINK TO USGS GAUGE
	Hazards: trees, pour over hydraulics at high levels - the last 
		hydraulic on S2 can be sticky at higher levels
	Description: S1 is a good class II run for intermediate boaters. 
		Beware of downed trees in this section.  S2 is a good run for 
		beginners.  Some of the best action on S2 comes just downstream
		of the put-in at a series of standing waves created by ledge drops.

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Illinois River (Hogeye Run)

     Rating: II+
       TDCR:
       Location: The put in is located at a bridge over the river just
               behind the "Hogeye Mall", a convienience store near 
               the intersection of Hwy 265 and 
               Hwy 156 (aka Hogeye Rd.). From Fayetteville, 
               take 265 to Hogeye either from the Cato Springs 
               exit or from the Greenland I-540 exit. Hwy 156 can
               be accessed from the West Fork exit as well. The main
               takeout is reached by driving north (toward Fayetteville)
               on Hwy 265 from the Hogeye Mall. The second marked county
               road on the left takes you to an old iron bridge across the
               river (this road is labeled as Orr Rd. on Google
               Maps. The first county road left (labeled Kinzer Rd) 
               will also take you to a slab across the river to cut off 
               a mile of the trip or to serve as a low water put-in, 
               but you miss some great rapids either way.
       Topo Quad(s): West Fork, Strickler
       Gradient: 14 fpm
       Length: 4 mi.
       Season: FLOOD
       Gauge: The run takes a lot of rain to get it going and it drops
               out pretty quickly. It runs when Fall Creek is running, so
               the USGS gauge for Baron Fork at Dutch Mills 
               may be a good predictor if rain is widespread (look for 
               over 3.5 feet and rising). Also check the Illinois R. at Savoy
               gauge. 5 to 6 feet on this gauge and
               rising fast can be a good sign. However there are 25+ miles
               and a ton of watershed between Hogeye and Savoy, so the
               correlation is not really that good.
       Hazards: Trees, strainers, and some barbed wire near the creek.
       Description: When West Fork gets pounded with rain, it's not a bad idea
               to drive the 15 minutes from Fayetteville to Hogeye to
               check out this great little class II+ run. If the creek
               looks like it can be boated without scraping at the put-in
               near Hogeye Mall, it's good to go. But it gets better and
               better with more water! When the gravel bars under the
               iron bridge at the takeout are under and the rapid
               upstream of the bridge looks like two big riverwide ledge
               holes, hang on to your hat! Though the gradient appears
               somewhat anemic, the run tends to pool up and then drop
               over ledges, making for terrific surfing at higher levels.
               At optimal levels, there are six to seven terrific surfing
               spots, though finding good eddies gets more problematic as
               the water rises. When the water's really cooking, it's
               mostly "catch on the fly" time on some honest-to-god BIG
               waves. At the slab bridge (possible takeout) a long ledgy
               section produces some nice spin holes, and another half
               mile downstream, a sloped ledge generates a powerful hole
               for spins and tricks. The rapid just above the iron bridge
               is the biggest drop, and at certain water levels, it's
               holes can be difficult to exit. However, if you swim there
               (and a few have!), just get your boat to the right bank at
               the bridge and crawl up to your vehicle! Beginners should
               watch out for some tricky maneuvering through trees in a
               few places, and, needless to say, it's no place for
               beginners when the water is high.

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Jordan Creek

	Rating: III+ *
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Put-in is .5 miles south of Cane Hill on Hwy 45. It 
		will be obvious when one sees an old mill sluice on the 
		left (east) side of the drainage (that can be an optional 
		put-in) and on the right (west) you will see a dirt road 
		that parallels Jordan Creek. There is a roadside pullover
		there with plenty of parking. You can also scout the meat
		of the run using both the dirt road and Hwy 45. The first
		drops of the run are along the dirt road, then on the other 
		side of the creek - less than 100 yards down the highway - 
		there is an old mill complete with huge steel grist wheel
		that is right on top of some of the best drops. It is marked
		on the topo maps as a roadside pullover. The take-out is 
		reached by going south on Hwy 45 4.5 miles. You will see 
		a road to your right, and two bridges should be visible 
		(within 1/4 mile from Hwy 45), a new one and an old arched
		bridge made of concrete (this is an optional take-out if 
		you want to extend the run another mile and a half). Continue
		across this bridge 1.9 miles until you see the third road 
		on the right, follow it a short distance down to a low-water
		crossing - the take-out.
	Topo Quad(s): Lincoln
	Gradient: 55 fpm
	Length: 4 mi.
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: Baron Fork at Dutch Mills should be 5.0 minimum. The
		correlation should be fairly good because it is only 4.5
		miles upstream from the guage, however there are two creeks
		that flow in upstream of the guage, so take that in
		consideration and check you precipitation estimates before
		you go.
	Hazards: Logs, log jams, barbed wire. There are several barbed wire
		fences that parallel the creek and could create a hazard
		after a flood, plus at least one cattle fence that
		needs to be treated with caution.  
	Description: First known descent occured on January, 5 2005 by
		Steve "dog" Robertson, Steve Runnles, Wood Harlan, and
		Paul.  The first part of the run consists of a mile of 
		III+ and has all the characteristics of a small steep 
		creek. Below the first mile it becomes a II-III run that 
		is pastoral, and this is where logs are a concern. The
		first mile is extremely accessible via the highway. 
		The creek is in a geographical "gray" area for whitewater,
		it is accesible by road, there is an accurate gauge 
		correlation and it not too far from West Cedar, which 
		provides a backup plan in case the water in Jordan is too 
		low.  Boaters who can handle creeks like Spirits and 
		Falling Water should be able to paddle Jordan Cr., and
		like those creeks, easy road accesibility makes this one
		very creeker-friendly.  Thanks to Steve Robertson for
		information on this run!

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Kings River

	Rating: III+ *
	TDCR: 5657
	Location: Madison Co.; Put in at Dripping Springs low water bridge
		north of Hwy. 16 just east of Boston.  Take out at
		Hwy. 74 bridge west of Kingston.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Weathers, Kingston
	Gradient: Steep at the start and non-existent at the end...
	Length: 11 mi
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: There is a gauge on the downstream side of the Dripping Springs
		bridge at the put-in.  It is graduated in 1/10 inch increments.
		Minimum is 1.0 ft., optimum from 1.5 to 2.5 ft., and if 
		water is running over the bridge the run is too high.  The
		Upper Kings is usually runnable when other area streams, such 
		as the Mulberry and White Rivers, are in flood.
		LINK TO USGS GAUGE
	Hazards: strainers, tight fast-paced rapids 
	Description: This run is not to be confused with the pastoral Kings R.
        that Tom Kennon describes in his book "Ozark Whitewater." This        is the Upper Kings that Kennon briefly mentions.  A serious
		class III+ run, the Upper Kings warms up for the first mile
		until Kings Falls (III), a sheer drop of over six feet, is 
		reached.  Below the falls the gradient picks up and several
		class III to III+ rapids are encountered.  God's Kitchen (III),
		Red Rock Sluice (IV), Jester (III), Wicked Game (III+), and
		Kings Throne (III+) are some of the more intense rapids.  The 
		toughest of these is Red Rock Sluice.  This one got it's name
		from the red marks made by David Thrasher's open canoe
		during the first descent of the creek.  Scout and/or portage it
		on the left.  Take time to enjoy this steep, exciting stretch 
		because the last six miles down to the Hwy. 74 bridge are as 
		flat as a pancake.  This character building paddle is the 
		price of admission for the great whitewater above.  DO NOT
		be tempted to shorten the run by taking out above Hwy. 74.
		The land is all private, and the landowners have threatened
		to tow any vehicles parked near the creek!  All boaters should
		have solid intermediate whitewater skills and advanced flat
		water skills for this run.  Seriously, be confident on fast
		class III-IV water or don't mess with this part of the Kings. 
		Thanks to Shelby Johnson for information on this run. 

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Lee Cr.

    Rating: II+   (S1: II-III, S2: II+)
    TDCR: 3232
    Location: Crawford Co.;
        S1: Put in south of Devil's Den Park on NFR 702 and take out 
            at Hwy 220 bridge.
        S2: Put in at the new Hwy 220 bridge (which replaced the classic
            "steel bridge" in 2000.  There's a dirt road on the river 
            left side upstream of the bridge that leads to a parking
            area.  Take out at the great new NFS take out by going
            south on Hwy 200 from the bridge about 200 yards and then
            turning right onto Lee Creek Community Rd. (gravel).  Go
            about 1/4 mile and follow the signs, turning right to
            drive to the parking area for the take out.  You can
            drive right to the river to pick up boats, but please
            park in the designated area.  This is an easy shuttle
            to walk if you don't want to mess with two cars.
         Area Map
    Topo Quad(s): Strickler, Rudy NE
    Gradient: 15 fpm
    Length: S1: 10 mi.,  S2: 1.5 mi.
    Season: FALL, SPRING
    Gauge: The USGS gauge at Short Oklahoma should be more than 4.5
        feet to scrape down.  Above 5.0 the play is fairly good.
        Above 6.0 it's much better!  S2 can be fun up to very high
        levels for advanced boaters, but most folks will think
        it's getting pretty crazy at anything over 8 feet or so.
        LINK TO USGS GAUGE
    Hazards: heavy strainers in S1, powerful hole at Buck and Flush at high
        levels
    Description: S2 is one of the most popular play runs in the area.
        Fun can be found at almost any runnable level.  The gradient is
        not great, but the short run seems to be filled with action.
        At higher levels waves and holes are abundant.  After a longish
        pool, the first drop is fast and powerful - and studded with
        rocks at lower levels.  It doesn't have any well known name,
        but the rest do.  Football Field Rapids is a 100 yard long,
        wide series of ledges.  This one is usually shallow with some 
        surf holes on the right and the hard to catch Touchdown Wave at 
        the end.  At very high levels (>12 feet) the entire rapid is 
        filled with large irregular waves and wave-holes!  The next drop
        is El Horrendo, which used to be less than half it's present
        width.  A tree washed out on the left bank in the mid 90's and
        the result was a much weaker, straightforward ledge at regular
        levels.  After a pool comes Surfing Ledges (also known by other
        names), where holes can be surfed, and enders can be had on the
        river right at levels of about 9 feet.  After another pool,
        Buck-N-Flush is waiting.  This rapid was long feared in the 90's
        for it's grabby, punishing hole at levels of 7+ feet.  Testing 
        oneself in Buck-N-Flush hole was sort of a right of passage for 
        Northwest Arkansas kayakers for a decade, and many a bold boater 
        tangled with the hole and lost, providing an opportunity to test
        PFD's and throw ropes.  While not terminal (swimmers generally
        flushed out almost immediately), this spot was maybe the most
        infamous stopper in the state.  But after the record flooding 
        of June 2000, a gravel bar downstream of the main ledge was 
        formed, the pool level was raised and the result was a kinder 
        and gentler hole.  At least for a while.  One of these days 
        another flood could relocate some gravel and surprise some
        boaters once again.  In any case, the main part of the hole
        can be avoided by staying to the left and riding down the
        seam of green water.  After Buck-N-Flush waves continue until
        the takeout at high levels.  Look for rock steps up the bank
        at the end of the long rock shelf on river left to take out.
        S1 is a different run entirely.  It has a few nice rapids,
        but the play is not nearly as good as the lower section.
        Also there is one of the worst strainer jungles in the Ozarks
        just upstream of the Blackburn Cr. confluence.  Due to the
        ugly hazards and lack of nice drops, S1 is not often run.
        S2 is a good run for agressive beginners, but S1 is much
        more dangerous and boaters running that stretch should 
        have experience negotiating strainers and holes.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Left Hand Prong (N. Fork Illinois Bayou)

        Rating: II-IV *
        TDCR: ????
        Location: Put-in: Take Hwy 16 East from Pelsor appox. 1.5 miles and 
                take an old logging road to the right (South). Follow the road 
                as far as possible and drag down the hill the confluence of
                the first two forks (Elevation 1500). Reach the take-out at
                the Victor bridge over the North Fork of the Illinois Bayou
                by taking Victor Road from Hwy 7 near the Freeman Springs
                Cemetery. 
        Topo Quad(s): Sand Gap
        Gradient: 140 fpm (300+ fpm max)
        Length: 8 mi. (2 mi. on LHP)
        Season: FLOOD
        Gauge: Gage at Richland Campground should to be above 6 or headed
                that way. Look for 1.5" or more rain at the Deer and Ben
                Hur rain gages, at the BNR Data Page. Rain must have fallen
                within the last 6 to 12 hours. 
        Hazards:  Undercut ledges and rocks, overhanging branches,
                strainers, waterfalls. 
        Description: First known descent was November 1, 1996. By Cowper
                Chadbourn, Chris Anderson, Robin Booth, Walter & Gayle
                Felton (OC-2), Lane Gorman, Lance Jones, Nate Kline and
                Robert Orr. The creek starts out small until joining with
                the Right Hand Prong and Cedar Creek. Most drops are tight
                continuous class II-III in nature, but a few IVs are
                scattered in for good measure. Scenery is very excellent!
                Shortly below the put-in is a tight complex slot drop with
                some pin potential. About 0.5 miles downstream is a poorly
                padded 5-6 ft ledge with a piton rock waiting. A hard
                landing is likely even with a good boof.  The highlight of 
                the creek comes shortly when the creek narrows to 3-4 feet 
                on a shallow bedrock slide. The slide ends in an 8 ft drop
                known as "The Spout" into a horseshoe shaped pool. The
                Right Hand Prong doubles the flow and some fun shoals and
                slides await near the confluence with Cedar Creek. There
                is a 4wd road to the right at Boyd Cemetery, if needed.
                But fun class II-III water with lots of surfing lasts for
                the next 3 miles to the Victor bridge. Like other
                micro-volume creeks, meaningful ratings are difficult to
                establish on the accepted International scale. At lower
                levels, the creek may seem like a very technical class
                III, with much rock bashing, scraping, and some portages.
                At higher levels, several rapids are expected to become
                solid class V.  Be familiar with the particular hazards
                of small Ozark creeks before attempting this run.  Thanks
                to Lance Jones for information on this creek!

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Little Mill Creek

	Rating: III-IV
	TDCR: 5676
	Location: The take-out is the same as is used for the Mill creek
		take-out on the bottom end of the Mulberry River.  It is
		on a road that turns east off of Hwy. 215 north of the 
		I-40 Mulberry exit.  The turn is about 3 miles north of the 
		freeway and just north of the Mill Cr. bridge on Hwy. 215
		(this is the only large creek crossing between I-40
		and the town of Fern).  Follow this dirt road for about
		1/4 mile to a low water slab and park off the road
		on the river right side.  Several put-ins are possible, but
		none are really easy.  Be very careful trying to cross
		the creek when the water is up, but if you can do it,
		you can follow the dirt road on the east side of the gorge.
		Just past the last house on the left (back in the woods),
		where the road is very near the creek, you can scramble
		down the bluff with your boat to access at Slap Happy Pappy
		rapid at the top of the lower gorge.  This is a good
		low water option, but it is not an easy climb down!
		Another couple of miles or so up the road, there is
		an old logging road that heads west toward the creek
		into an old clearcut area.  The turn onto this road is 
		greater than 90 degrees if you're heading north (it's 
		a "Y" intersection from the other direction).  You'll
		probably want to drive only a little way down this road
		(the USFS tries to block it from time to time).  Park
		and walk down the old road and bear downhill to the
		creek.  You'll cut through the clearcut and down
		through a bluff line.  When you intersect the creek
		you are at Fern Gulley - either put in here if there
		is enough water or cross and continue down a short
		distance to the confluence with the Middle Fork.  If 
		the water is too high to cross the low water slab at the
		takeout (which it often is), you can drive back to 215
		and then north to Fern.  When 215 turns east at Fern,
		go until you pass an A-frame house on the right.  Take
		the next right on a very good geavel road.  This is
		the same road that crosses the creek at the takeout.
		Follow it for a mile or so to the "Y" with the
		old logging road that leads to the put-in
		described above.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Mountainburg SE
	Gradient: 120 fpm (first mile @ 180 fpm)
	Length: 2.75 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: The Mulberry should be high and rain farily recent to
		run the creek.  The best way to gauge it is at the
		takeout slab.  An inch or so of water over this slab
		is absolute zero level for a run down the lower
		gorge section (the upper part is too low).  With
		6 inches of water over the slab in the middle,
		the gorge will be good and the upper creek bony.
		A foot or more is a good level for the entire creek.
		If the creek is spreading into the parking area,
		it will be very pushy and dangerous - it has been
		run with several feet of water over the slab, but
		that can't be recommended!  The USGS Mulberry R. at
		Mulberry gauge is not a great indicator for Little Mill
		since it is upstream of the Mill Cr. confluence.  However
		a level of 8 feet or more on the Mulberry gauge is a 
		good sign that Little Mill could be there.  Also,
		the USGS rain gauge at Mulberry is close to Little
		Mill's watershed, so a rain of 2 inches or more
		in a short time is also a good indicator.
	Hazards: many trees and strainers, large drops, undercut rocks
	Description: First run on 2/21/97 by Steve Robertson, Zen Boulden,
		Kent Peetz, and Richard Haler, this creek is a real gem.
		The creek starts at the confluence of Fern Gulley 
		(the East Fork) and the Middle Fork of Little Mill (both
		are steeper creek runs when the water is high).  Just
		downstream, the West Fork enters to add more volume.
		The first major rapid is Gollum's Hole, a class III
		drop around a blind right hand corner, with a spooky 
		series of caves in a sandstone bluff at the bottom.  At
		really high levels, this rapid and the next one, Stone
		Ground (III) have some mean holes that must be punched.
		The next two miles of the creek consists of almost 
		constant rapids, though at optimal levels none are 
		tougher than class III.  Trees are often a major hazard
		in these two miles, so stay alert and be ready to
		eddy out and portage!  The creek suddenly opens up and
		changes character as Slap Happy Pappy Sluice (III-)
		is encountered.  This is usually a scape down a wide
		shoal unless the water is extremely high.  The creek
		narrows again, but now has a solid bedrock bottom.  This
		is the lower gorge - the main attraction!  After some
		smaller drops, the horizon line of Lacerator (III+)
		comes into view.  Don't flip here or you may find out
		how it got its name!  The next drop is The Gash, a class
		IV at optimal levels.  The eddies below Lacerator are
		hard to catch, so it may be a good idea to scout both
		of these drops if you're new to the creek.  The Gash
		starts with a move to the right around a big mid-stream
		rock and then a short slide into a turbulent sluice.
		This is kayak pinball at it's finest!  Strong cross 
		currents tend to try to push you into the jagged looking
		rock wall on the right near the bottom.  You can
		try to stay left, but failure may result in a flip
		and The Gash is not a good place to be out of control!
		An alternate plan is to go with the flow and play the
		bank shot off of the reaction pillow against the wall.
		This is a gutsy looking move, but with good boat control 
		and a solid brace it can result is a smooth ride
		to the bottom.  After The Gash is a ledge with a hole
		that demands respect at higher levels and then the
		Undercut From Hell.  This is a rocky drop that feeds 
		into a jagged and deeply undercut wall on the left side.
		Though it can be snuck to the far right, a scout and/or
		portage here is prudent.  After a bit more water,
		the last major rapid can be recognized from the large
		horizon line on river left.  This is Love Shack Falls,
		and it is the biggest drop on the creek.  Love Shack
		has been run on the left over the big angled ledge,
		but it is a shallow landing and can result in a bruising.
		The more frequently run line is down the entrance
		rapid on the right, hang the corner, and try to get
		to the middle of the waterfall for a boof.  The base of
		this 6-7 footer is rocky, and a long boat could 
		vertically pin here if the nose plunges deep.  Failure 
		to boof has resulted in the occasional elbow injury. 
		Boats can be carried back up on far river left
		for another run here, and The Gash is also a good
		candidate for multiple runs if you don't mind tempting
		fate!  The gorge ends at Love Shack and the rapids are
		tree-choked class II to the takeout 1/4 mile down.
		Little Mill is a great steep creek run in the southern
		Ozarks.  It's maybe a half-notch tougher than 
		nearby Spirits Cr. which may be a good alternative 
		for those not sure about tackling the more hazardous 
		rapids on Little Mill.  If you're a Fayetteville or 
		Fort Smith boater, this creek is a good reason to 
		not drive all the way to Richland!  Thanks go to 
		Steve Robertson for information on this one.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Little Mill Cr., West Fork

	Rating: III+ (IV) *
	TDCR: ????
	Location: the put-in road is off Hwy 215 4 miles from the Mill Creek
		bridge. Take-out is the same as the Little Mill take-out. 
		An optional put-in may be accessed 2.7 miles from Mill Creek 
		Bridge but is 4x4 only and may not get you to the creek 
		without a hard hike.
	Topo Quad(s): Mounatinburg SW
	Gradient: 228 fpm
	Length: 1.6 mi. (plus 2.75 mi on Little Mill Cr.)
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: The Mulberry should be huge (8 feet) and rising on the USGS
		gauge at Mulberry to catch the West Fork of Little Mill. 
		Little Mill Cr. should almost be covering all of the concrete 
		of the slab at the takeout.  You can also check Fern Gulley -
		if it is at a runnable level, the West Fork should be too.
	Hazards: continuous rapids, undercuts, and of course a bunch 
		of logs!
	Description: This creek was first run on January 4, 2005 
		by Steve "Dog" Robertson, Steve Runnles and Sammy Wellborn. 
		It is 1.6 miles of nearly continuous class III with a 
		couple of drops besides the big one at the bottom that 
		approach class IV in difficulty.  The big drop comes 
		right before the confluence with Little Mill, and is
		formed by a boulder pile. There is an undercut on river 
		right, but most of the current blows by it.  At high water 
		the whole run might be bumped up to class IV.  This is 
		a great alternate run for those not yet ready to handle 
		the more serious hazards on Fern Gulley or Mormon Creek.
		Those comfortable on Little Mill and Spirits Cr. could
		make the step up to this creek when the water is high in 
		the area - just watch out for the fast pace of drops and
		the high potential for logs blocking the streambed.
		The run is WAY fun, has plenty of challenging whitewater, 
		and there is no hike in.  What more can you ask for?  Oh 
		yeah, how about three miles of Little Mill Creek running
		high to boot!  Thanks to Steve Robertson for information
		on this and the entire Little Mill drainage!

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Little Mulberry Cr. (A.K.A. Microwave Run)

	Rating: III-IV *
	TDCR: 5657
	Location: Madison Co.;  Put in is reached by turning on a dirt road
		to the south two miles east of Red Star on Hwy. 16.  The
		road is located just below a large microwave tower.  Follow
		this road till it ends or until the going gets too rough
 		for your vehicle.  Then hike down to the creek.  Take out
		at the Spoke Plant low water bridge 5 miles downstream.
		IMPORTANT NOTE: a landowner on the creek above Spoke Plant 
		has expressed concern with paddlers boating this stretch, which
		runs through her property and does not want anyone to boat the 
		creek at this time.  Boaters are encouraged to respect the 
		landowner's wishes.  If you need to contact the landowner, please 
		contact me, Fish, at webmaster@ozarkpages.com.		
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Boston
	Gradient: 60-80 fpm
	Length: 5 mi
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: None.  Can be run only after heavy local rains.
	Hazards: fast action, strainers, and class III+ rapids
	Description: This run was pioneered by Shelby Johnson and Ryan
		Johnson in Spring of 1994.   The first mile and a half
		packs quite a punch with rapids like Initiator (III), a 
		6 ft. waterfall, and OWS (Ozark Wall Slammer) (III+).  Several
		class III drops are then followed by Fish Ladder (IV), a
		congested boulder sieve that remains unrun due to low water
		conditions on the first descent.  Several class III rapids
		follow until the paddler reaches Plank Rapid (III).  Here the
		paddler must eddy out and remove a plank bridge before running
		the rapid.  Be sure to replace the plank after completing
		this fun drop.  Several class II-III rapids follow until the
		takeout.  Strainers are a fact of life on small Ozark creeks, 
		so watch out for downed trees that can easily block the
		creek.  Only solid class IV boaters should attempt this
		fast paced and challenging run.  Thanks to Shelby Johnson
		for information on this run.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Long Branch (EFLB)

	Rating: III-V *
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Newton Co.; Go North on CR 28 from Deer toward Wayton and
		Parthenon. This road takes you past the Alum Cove recreation area. 
		Continue for 2 miles North past the rec. area and park on the side 
		of the road. Drag West down the through the woods aiming for the 
		confluence of the top two forks. (Elevation 1800) The creek is small 
		and basically a shallow bedrock shoal for first 0.25 miles.  Reach the 
		take-out by continuing North to the community of Wayton from the put-in.
		Turn left (West) on CR 96 at the Wayton Baptist Church. Go 2.3 miles and 
		turn left (South) on CR 95. Snow cemetery should be on the right. 
		Continue ~2.5 miles down the mountain to the community of Murray. Be sure 
		to check out the scenery on the way down. Especially the small but tall 
		waterfall above the first creek crossing. At the bottom of the hill, 
		there are a couple of houses on the right then a triangle intersection. To
		the left, Willis Park is beside the creek at the low-water bridge and there 
		will probably be standing water in the field. Park at the community
		building next to the park at the intersection. Be sure to thank any 
		locals and leave a donation for this facility. (Elevation 1065) 
	Topo Quad(s): Murray
	Gradient: 285 fpm (450 fpm for last .4 miles on Long Branch)
	Length: 2 miles on Long Branch followed by 4.5 miles on East Fork Little Buffalo
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Gauge at Richland Campground should to be above 6 or headed that way.
		Look for 1.5" or more rain at the Deer and Mockingbird Hill and Murray 
		rain gages, at the BNR Data Page. Rain must have fallen within the last
		6 to 12 hours.
	Hazards: Undercut ledges and rocks, overhanging branches, strainers,
		waterfalls.  Very tight in places (pinning hazards). Watch your
		head at 'Duck and Cover'. The last 0.5 miles of the creek is 
		essentially one long steep complex rapid.
	Description: First known descent was March 19, 2002 by Lance Jones, 
		Cowper Chadbourn, Greg Churan, Heath Day, Scott Hanshaw, Bryan Hughbanks, Mike
		Jacobs, Jeremy Kasouf, Nate Kline, Matt May, John McCoy, Jason Mellor, Mike
		Oglesby and Ray Skinner.  The creek starts out very narrow with a 0.2+ mile 
		long shoal. Shortly after crossing an ATV trail a third fork enters from the
		left. Immediately below this fork is the first set of drops. The first horizon
		line is a steep fast slide dropping 12-15 ft followed shortly by a 6-8 ft
		waterfall (run on left or right) followed shortly by a 20-ft steep fast slide
		into a small pool. Leave the pool far right in a narrow slide, ramp up on the
		right bank to avoid slamming the boulder on river left and ride the flume out
		the bottom. After these first drops, the creek becomes boulder drops. The next
		horizon line is an interesting double drop named 'Duck and Cover'. The first
		4-ft drop is under an overhanging rock into a sticky boiling hole. The second
		part offers a nasty slot with pin/piton potential on river left or shallow
		slide down river right. Lots more nice class III/IV for the next mile with 
		some nice drops like "Baby Zwick's" and 'Switchback'. Haunt Hollow enters from 
		river right to add a little more water before the meat of the lower gorge begins.
		The bottom gorge offers very steep banks and 450+ ft/mile for a third mile. 
		Big complex boulder drops with holes, pin potential and undercuts. The portages 
		are worse! The lower gorge consists back to back drops with small eddys 
		scattered about. The beginning is a boof from the right aiming left. Go 
		left of the first rock and boof off the second back to the right. This 
		avoids the two holes to the right of the rocks and lines up for the final 
		slot on the right. Small eddys on each side offer a break before dropping 
		over a 3-ft ledge preferably right. The left side below the ledge feeds a 
		boiling eddy which pillows on a rock blocking most of the exit.  One more 
		small eddy and through a 5-ft slot drop, eddy left. Boof center over the small 
		hump into the next eddy on river right. Pin potential in the river right 
		tongue beside the hump. Below this river right eddy is the 'Particle Separator'. 
		Name has dual meaning. First, the rapid requires a 3-ft boof to the left over 
		the broken ledge aiming for a boat wide slot on river left beside the 'separator'
		rock and over an 8-ft ledge at the bottom. Going right of the separator rock 
		will take you into a nasty looking notch. Will probably flush though but it 
		may be a bumpy ride. Second, it separates the boaters from the walkers 
		(The portage is high and tough on either bank.) A couple eddys are available 
		below the ledge before entering the 'Long Branch Saloon'. Majority of 
		the flow funnels left toward a house size boulder. Enter the door to the 
		left onto the tongue beside the pillow and get ready for a punch in the 
		face from the hole at the bottom of the 10-ft drop. At high water this 
		hole could become nasty as the creek is constricted between the large 
		boulder on the left, the cliff on the right and water pouring straight 
		down into the deep pool. Out of the pool and work between some rocks 
		and back to the right. Boof off the 5-ft ledge onto a sluice/slide. 
		Follow the flume around the sharp left hand turn, avoid the left bank 
		and eddy right. The main rapid is next. The gorge ends in a bang with 
		'Freeride'. This rapid drops 45-50 ft over 100 yards. A long complex 
		solid class V rapid starting with 3 boulder slot moves followed by a 5-ft 
		boof into a small eddy on the left. There is no stopping after this eddy 
		until the pool at the bottom. The creek turns sharply right over a cluttered 
		4-ft rock pile. Best line is middle to right, ride the bow high on the 
		right bank as it turns back to the left. Negotiate a route through some 
		trash rocks down the right side as the creek turns back to the left. Line 
		up for an 8-ft boof onto a slide. Hit the boof right with left angle to 
		avoid the right shelf rock and the hole and undercut wall on the left. Once 
		on the slide, quick acceleration takes over to the final 10+ foot waterfall. 
		Punch through the curler pushing you right on the approach to the waterfall. 
		You want to be left to avoid the large boulder on the bottom right side 
		of the pool. Just around the corner from the pool is the East Fork Little 
		Buffalo. The creek enters ~ 0.5 miles below Johnson's Falls so get ready 
		for 4.5 miles of big water through the meat of the EFLB at flood! This is 
		class IV+ big water with juicy holes, swirlies and crosscurrents. Like other 
		micro-volume creeks, meaningful ratings are difficult to establish on the 
		accepted International scale. At lower levels, the creek will seem like a 
		very technical Class III, with much rock bashing, scraping, and some 
		portages. At higher levels, several rapids are solid Class V. Thanks go 
		to Lance Jones for the description of this run. See Lance Jones' Pages 
		for more info.

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Long Devils Fork Cr.

	Rating: III-V *
	TDCR: 8786
	Location: Newton Co.;  Put in is just south of Ketcherside Mtn on 
		Lurton Quad; start near where map shows elevation 2059 on 
		road, follow faint remains of old logging road SE downhill 
		then turning to NE and continuing down ridge to creek junction
		just below elev. 1600.  Drag from main road is about 0.7 mi. 
		to put-in.  Take-out is at Richland Creek Campground.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Lurton, Moore
	Gradient: 180 fpm (not counting Richland)
	Length: 2.5 mi. plus 1.5 mi. on Richland
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Water should be nearly flush with Richland Campground bridge 
		or above 6 ft on the ACC Bulletin Board gauge.  Also, look for
 		1.5" or more rain at the Deer and Ben Hur rain gages, as
		posted on the ACC Bulletin Board.  Rain must have fallen
		within the last 6 to 12 hours for a run.  At very high levels,
		expect a solid class V run for 4 miles.
        Hazards: difficult rapids, overhanging branches, strainers,
              waterfalls.
	Description: First known run was April 30, 1995, by Cowper
		Chadbourn, Chris Jones, and Nathan Kline, with the 
		exception of Long Devils Falls (river right side of Twin 
		Falls) which was first run April 11, 1995 by Cowper Chadbourn
		(followed shortly by all others who were participating in the
		first run of Big Devils Fork).  In early May, 1995, Lance 
		Jones made the first OC-1 run of this stretch of whitewater 
		with some portages).  Dale Barton claimed the first OC-1 run 
		of Long Devils Falls about this same time.  This run is very
		similar to Big Devils, but has generally cleaner drops, longer
		slides, and fewer undercuts.  This run has what has to be one
		of the longest (but not the steepest!) rock slides in Arkansas;
		expect terminal velocity if water is sufficient to prevent
		scraping!  Just below the first big waterfall (8 to 10 feet),
		you will encounter "The Devil's Playground".  Look for the 
		runnable channel down the river left side.  If you choose to 
		run the 16 to 18' waterfall at Twin Falls, run left of center 
		and try to maintain good speed to launch well into the pool
		below.  Several pitons have occurred due to low speed, right of
		center runs of this falls.  Also, the portage around the falls
		may be more hazardous than the run.  At lower levels,
 		consider tying your throw rope to your boat and letting the
		boat run the falls without you.  All drops on Long Devils have
		been run, but many could be rough for an inverted boater.
		After you leave Devils Fork, the run down Richland (IV+ at
		these levels) gives you little opportunity to relax!  This
		run is for expert level boaters only.  The room for error
		on the run is very, very small, and mistakes will be punished!
		A flooded run on Falling Water Cr. would probably be a more
		sane option that tackling this creek before you're ready.
		Thanks go to Cowper Chadbourn for the description of this run.
		See Lance Jones' Pages for more info on Long Devils Cr.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Meadow Creek

        Rating: III+
        TDCR: 5567
        Location: From Leslie, AR on Hwy 65 go 7 miles east on Hwy 66 to
                Oxley. Turn right on paved county road and travel 2 miles
                to end of pavement. Turn left and follow winding county
                road 3 miles to a T-intersection. Turn left and go 0.5 mile
                to the Flag intersection. Turn left and go 1.5 miles to a
                low-water bridge where the road makes a 90 degree right
                turn. This is the put-in. Return to the Flag intersection
                and continue straight (this would be a right turn in the
                put-in directions). About 3 miles past Flag at the bottom
                of the mountain you will come to a flooded Suck Hollow
                Creek crossing. The take-out is at the mouth of this creek  
                as it flows into Meadow Creek 100 yards below the road. If
                you miss the mouth of Suck Hollow Branch while paddling you
                can take-out at a low-water bridge 0.5 mile further down
                the creek and walk the county road 0.5 mile back to the
                vehicle. If you decide to cross this creek you can drive
                0.5 mile further to the low-water bridge and take-out
                there. The bridge will probably have 3-4 ft of water over
                it so keep in mind if the creeks are still rising you may
                become stranded between two flooded creeks. In addition, as
                you have probably figured out by now, your are a long way
                from nowhere.
        Topo Quad(s): Fox, Oxley
        Gradient: 55 fpm
        Length: 5.5 mi.
        Season: Rain
        Gauge: The Middle Fork of the Little Red should be at least 12 ft
                or more in Shirley. This gauge however has its limits
                because the Little Red is a large river and several miles
                below its headwaters when it gets to Shirley. Meadow Creek
                does not have a significant impact on the Little Red so the
                gauge is approximate. There should be at least 1 ft. of
                water over the put-in bridge for a good run. The Tick Creek
                tributary to Meadow Creek is tiny at the put-in, but it
                meets two other tributaries and nearly triples in size
                within 200 yards of the put-in.
        Hazards: waterfalls, undercuts, strainers, trees
        Description: The first two miles on Tick Creek are chocked full of
                willow lined chutes and fast II+ water. At about two miles
                the paddler reaches Squeeze-the-Tick (III) where the creek
                turns sharply left and drops about 15 ft. over 20 yards
                through a very narrow willow lined chute. The approach to
                Squeeze is sudden and the decision to run the left chute
                must be made quickly. Don't run the right chute because of
                a poorly placed tree growing in the middle of your path. 
                About 1/4 mile farther Tick Creek meets Jimmy's Creek
                entering from river left and the two become Meadow Creek.
                The next mile contains fast II+ water with some nice
                boulder dodging. A small bluff on river right signals the
                arrival of Walk-on-the-Wild-Slide (II-III+). The Slide is
                river wide and drops 15 ft. or more over about 15 yards.
                At a level of 1 ft. over the put-in bridge the Slide
                should be run river left. A Walk in the name implies the
                slide should be ported at lower levels for the sake of
                boat preservation. At higher levels the Slide a wild
                cascade with two river wide holes on the way down and a
                slap-you-in-the-face stopper at the bottom. The bottom
                hole provides nice surfing at lower levels. About 1/4 mile
                below the Slide hides a 15 yard long undercut ledge on
                river right. This could be dangerous at lower levels so
                pay close attention. Another 1/2 mile later the roaring of
                Meadow Creek Falls (III+) announces the arrival of a nice
                scouting trail on river right. The Falls section drops
                approximately 25-30 ft. over 150 yards and cannot be
                scouted adequately from your boat. The only line available
                to run the sheer 8 foot drop is about 15 feet from river
                right. The paddler needs plenty of speed and a good boof
                to avoid the nasty hydraulic below. A bad boof will result
                in a Class IV+ nightmare. I have seen these falls without
                water and they are no place to be inverted or swimming.
                Paddle aggressively and catch an eddy before washing
                through the rest of the falls. From the pool below the
                falls you paddle through a wide slot on river right and
                blast through Greener Pastures Ahead (III). Greener
                Pastures is the last drop in the Falls section. It's a
                narrow, but straight forward chute on river left that
                drops about 12 ft. over 10-15 yards. Watch for brush
                hanging out over the chute from the bluff on river left.
                In higher water Greener Pastures Ahead may be run on river
                right which ends with a 5 ft. sheer drop. Looking back up
                through the Falls section provides a very nice picture of
                just how scenic whitewater paddling can be. The remaining
                2 miles provide little time to relax as the fast II+ water
                continues to wind through narrow slots lined with willows
                and dotted with trees. If you plan to take-out at the
                mouth of Suck Hollow Branch it is a large tributary on
                river right as Meadow Creek makes a hard left turn about 1
                1/2 miles below the falls. Meadow Creek was first run on
                January 6, 1998 by Randall Gammill and Nick Hansen of
                Springfield, Missouri. It compares well with many other
                intermediate runs in the Ozarks. It has good length,
                gradient, scenery and doesn't require a flood for a good
                level.

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Micro Cr.

	Rating: III
	TDCR: 5570
	Location: Crawford Co.; Put in and take out 1/10 mi. below Lee Cr.
		put in (S2) at Hwy. 220 bridge.  You can boat or walk down
		to the creek which enters Lee on river right as Lee bends
		sharply to the left.
	Topo Quad(s): Rudy NE
	Gradient: ??? fpm  (it's very, very steep and short)
	Length: 0.1 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Lee Cr. should be flooded (> 12 ft.)  This one can only be
		boated immediately after extremely heavy rainfall.
	Hazards: several trees standing in the creek and very tight, bony 
		drops.
	Description: If you are lucky enough to catch Lee Cr. an hour or
		less after a big rain, you may want to look at this
		tiny creek with no name.  The entire run consists of two
		drops.  The first is a 6-7 ft. class III+ with a narrow
		margin for error and a very shallow landing.  After a short
		lesson in tree dodging the second drop of about 5 ft. is
		encountered.  The creek never gets more than 10 ft. wide, so
		maneuvering and/or eddy catching is a joke.  This is a good
		side trip during a run on a very flooded Lee Cr.  Just make
		sure you are ready to pay the price in lost skin if you screw
		up on this one!

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Middle Fork of Little Mill Cr.

     Rating: III-IV
        TDCR: 6786
        Location: Traveling south on Hwy. 215 from Fern, go one mile then take
		a left (east) on a gravel road (if you go 100 yards past it there is
		a yellow two-story house indicating you've gone too far). Follow
		this road for about 200 yards until it turns to the south and 
                begins to go uphill where the road widens and there is
                plenty of room to park. Park you car here, and carry down to the 
		put-in, a short 100-150 yards due east. This is the confluence of
		the middle fork and two tributaries; slides and waterfalls
                abound!  The take-out is found by going south on 215 from Fern,
                turning left at the Ozark National Forest sign, and then taking the first
                right. This will follow a finger ridge, then a steep slope down to
                the mouth of the Middle Fork Gorge (this is also the put-in for Little
		Mill Cr.). From the highway to the take-out is 1 mile. This is
		definitely a road for 4WD's only! If the Middle Fork is up then this
                take-out will be an adventure in itself, class IV driving at least!
        Topo Quad(s): Mountainburg SE
        Gradient: 187 fpm
        Length: 1.5 mi.
        Season: Flood
        Gauge: Creeks such as Spirits and others larger creeks like
                Hurricane must be in full flood. If Mill Creek appears to be
                bank-full at the Mill Creek Bridge then it is ready. If it
                just looks runnable then it may be too low.  Two or more
		inches of very recent rain are a must for this creek.
        Hazards:  undercut rocks, downed trees, strainers, undercut grottos
        Description: The defining characteristic of the Middle Fork is the
                exposed sandstone bedrock that literally forms a sandstone 
                sluice for a large part of this section. This sluice
                varies from 6 to 20 feet in width and drops over shale and
                sandstone falls that are at times partially blocked by
                sandstone boulders. There are at least two drops over
                boulders into grottos that need to be scouted due to the
                possibility of vertical pins or lodging under undercut
                ledges. It is a unique run in that civilization (I-40 is
                less than 8 miles away) is close, but the extreme relief
                so effectively isolates the paddler that one feels as
                though it is a wilderness run. To not do the rest of
                Little Mill would be silly indeed, especially when one
                considers the condition of the access road to reach the
                take out.  Middle Fork of Little Mill is a tough creek that
		gives the paddler very little room to maneuver.  You had
		better be a very competent class IV boater, or you may find out
		just how extreme the relief is as you are hiking out of the
		gorge.  As with all super-narrow Ozark creeks, trees can be
		a huge factor in the difficulty of the run.  Deadfalls can
		easily create some overnight class V traps on the Middle Fork,
		so scout ahead as often as possible.  Thanks go to Steve Roberston,
		the pioneer of the Little Mill/Mill drainages, for information
		on this terrific run.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.
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Middle Fork of the Little Red R.

	Rating: II+
	TDCR: ????
	Location:  Searcy and Van Buren Co.;  Take Hwy. 110 east of Hwy. 9
		(south of Shirley) to Old Lexington.  Drive approximately 
		3 miles past Old Lexington to the second dirt road to
		the right (north).  Follow this road until it closely
		parallels the river (on the left).  It's a good idea to
		seek permission to park here, since the land is privately
		owned.  To take out, find a small dirt road that runs north
		from Old Lexington.  Drive about two miles to a low-water 
		bridge over the creek in Arlberg.    
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Oxley, Old Lexington
	Gradient: ?? fpm
	Length: 10 mi
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: The USGS gauge at Hwy. 9 can be used for this run.
		Min: 8.5 ft.
		Max: 11.0 ft.
		LINK TO USGS GAUGE
	Hazards: numerous strainers
	Description: This run contains many good class II+ rapids, and
		the action is pleasantly continuous.  Walter Diggs Rapid
		is encountered halfway into the run, and it is a long
		class III rapid that many less experienced boaters may want
		to portage.  The willow strainers are unrelenting on this
		run.  If you don't have great boat control in class II water,
		this isn't the run for you.  

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Mill Creek

     Rating: II-III+
        TDCR: 4555
        Location: You can put in up in Devil's Canyon, but this is not recommended
		for three reasons.  One is that the put-in is a long drag into a gorge
		that is hard enough to access without having a boat to drag.  The second
		is that Devil's Canyon Branch of Mill Cr. is usually too small and dry to
		paddle, necessitating an even longer drag down to the main branch of 
		Mill Cr. The last reason is the multitude of deadfalls that require long
		portages on the upper creek.  The few good rapids in Devil's Canyon are
		not worth the effort. A better put-in can be reached by going about a
		mile north of the Hwy 215 bridge over Mill Cr.  You'll see the National
		Forest sign marking the forest boundary. Within the next mile there is a
		private inholding consisting of a big rectangular area on the left side of
		the road (the inholding is clearly marked on the Ozark National Forest Map).
		This was orignally owned by a church (still marked on the map) and
		there is a building that used to serve as the church but is now a private
		residence.  Keep going past this building and look for a gravel road on the
		left.  Go past this road and take the next small road on the left.  Drive
		as far as you can and then park and walk down to the creek. These directions
		are still very rough, so follow them at your own risk. The take-out is
		the easy to access Hwy 215 bridge over Mill Cr. a few miles north of I-40
		near Mulberry.  If you want to access in Devil's Canyon, you can follow
		Hwy. 215 north from the take-out until you see a small dirt road on the
		left with a red post near it.  Follow this road through a clear-cut 
		until you come to a posted gate.  Go right at this gate until you
		see the dark red National Forest Boundary marks on some trees.
		Park anywhere and start hiking left off of the road toward the
		canyon.
        Topo Quad(s): Fern, Mountainburg SE
        Gradient: 86 fpm
        Length: 7 mi. from Devil's Canyon to Hwy 215
        Season: RAIN
        Gauge: If the rapid above the 215 bridge appears to be runnable
                then it should be at a runnable level. The run is at the
                bottom of the creek, so the appearance of this rapid is a
				direct reflection of the conditions upstream.  The higher
				the water the better the ride over the slide drops upstream.
				The Mulberry should probably be around 5 ft. or more, but
				it is not a great gauge for Mill Cr. if rains are localized.
        Hazards:  strainers, undercut ledges and boulders
        Description: This is a strange, but cool Ozark creek.  If you are crazy enough
		to carry down into one of the steepest canyons in the Ozarks, Devil's
		Canyon, you'll be rewarded with a very small creek that has some good
		drops but little water.  This creek merges with the main branch of Mill
		Cr. about 1/2 mile downstream, and until this confluence there is rarely
		enough water to boat.  The first two miles of the creek are fairly
		uneventful, with constant easy class II drops and a couple of tougher
		rapids.  Then the next mile is a portage, with bunches of trees
		dropped into the creek by the tornado that ravaged Fort Smith in 1996.
		It almost looks as if the area has been clearcut and the trees left to
		rot.  The only bright side to this is that it gives you lots of time
		to admire the interesting bluffs that rise up to the left of the creek.
		After a long, ugly walk, the trees end, and fortunately they don't
		return.  This is where the second access point is - a much better place
		to put in.  After this point the creek gets quite interesting as it cuts
		down through several layers of sandstone and shale, creating numerous
		small falls and slides.  The biggest of these is Charlie's Slide
		which can be recognized by a car sized boulder that sits dead center
		just upstream of the slide.  The creek drops 10 to 15 feet over a very
		cool low-angle side drop.  The rapids for the next three miles are
		predominantly easy class III drops that are nearly continuous.  Stay
		alert for a couple of potentially nasty undercuts that can sneak up
		on you if you get too complacent.  At high water the surfing is
		about as good as it gets in the Ozarks.  True eastern style boating
		in your backyard.  Not as hard as it's tributary Little Mill Cr.,
		Mill Cr. has a bigger watershed and will be runnable when other
		creeks in the area are not going.  The first known kayak run of Mill
		creek was in 4/98 by Charlie "No Paddle" Stotts, Steve "Treedini" 
		Robertson, and Bill "Pickled" Herring, a truly crazy bunch of boaters.

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Mormon Creek

	Rating: IV (IV+)
	TDCR: 7895
	Location: Drive north on Hwy 215 from I-40 (the Mulberry exit) about 
		five miles to the bridge over Mill Cr.  This is the takeout.
		To reach the put-in, go north from the Mill Cr. bridge
		on Hwy 215 approximately 3 miles.  There you will see an Ozark 
		National Forest sign on the right.  Go past this sign and look 
		for the first well-maintained road on the left (it should be 
		fairly obvious, since the others "roads" are old logging roads 
		and skitter trails).  Follow this road until it dead ends at a 
		berm. There is a trail that has been beat down to the left of
		the bern, and a big 4WD truck can make it down, but it is only 
		a 1/3 mile drag down to the creek, so why not park at the top.
	Topo Quad(s): Mountainburg SE
	Gradient: 330 fpm
	Length: 1.5 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Mormon Cr. is tiny. It doesn't need much water to make 
		a good run, but the level will not hold long at all.  It 
		can generally be paddled for only a couple of hours follwing 
		heavy downpours of rain.  Look for 2+" in under 2 hours to
		pump the creek up.  The Mulberry should be flooded, probably
		8 feet or higher on the Mulberry gauge. A visual check should
		be made at the Mill Cr. bridge (the take-out). Mill Creek 
		should be bank-full or better, meaning ALL of the rocks in 
		the rapid above the bridge should be covered and the water 
		should be very muddy.  If you get to the put-in and there 
		looks like there's enough water to scrape down in a boat,
		it's probably a good level.  If you're not scraping down
		the first long slide, the level is extremely high and
		hazardous.
	Hazards: The 20+ foot drop of Mammer Jammer is certainly a 
		serious hazard! The entire creek is fast and shallow,
		so it is nowhere to be upside down in your boat! Trees 
		can be (and usually are) a serious threat.  Often, you 
		may not have any eddies to stop in for long distances, 
		and with the extremely narrow streambed, trees can 
		easily block the entire creek.  Scouting ahead from every 
		you can get in eddy is a very good idea, and be prepared
		to hit a tree somewhere on the run.
	Description: Mormon Creek was first run February 15, 2001, by
		Steve "Dog" Robertson and Micah "Nick" Adams.  Mormon creek
		does not have a name on any maps, but the closest landmark 
		is an old Latter Day Saints church, and thus the name.
		It begins as a small sandstone ditch that is almost
		laughable when one considers this a "runnable" creek,
		however it is not to be taken lightly. The put-in starts 
		one of the longest slides in the Ozarks, at least 
		1/2 mile long, with numerous 3 to 6 foot ledges to 
		generate interest. There aren't any major tributaries to 
		Mormon Cr., but hundreds of little creeks cascading down
		the sandstone/shale bluffs gradually contribute to
		the water level and volume picks up steadily as you go 
		downstream.  Several bigger ledges signal the beginning
		of the gorge, so when you encounter these, it's time
		to strap on your seat belt.  At high water, the creek
		will come at you incredibly fast with few eddies to
		stop in.  The first major drop, "UH", is a nice "sluice-
		with-rocks" type drop of about 6 to 8 feet. Pull out to
		scout this and the next rapids too, since it is followed 
		immediately by "OH", a 12-15' near vertical slide with a 
		shallow landing. Recover quickly because at the end of the 
		pool (25 yards) below OH is "Snake Eyes", a potentially 
		nasty class IV drop. This whole area is reminicent of a 
		tea-cup style series of drops, dropping a total of 15-20 
		feet onto a sandstone slide that ends in a pool. The rapid 
		gets its name from the large boulder that looks like a dice 
		(showing the number two) lodged in the left side of the 
		drop. At low water, the drop should be run from the left 
		at a 45 degree angle to the right; at high water run it 
		anyway you can! Now, you're in the heart of the gorge, 
		consisting of a narrow, winding closed in sandstone
		trough surrounded by undercut sandstone and shale walls.
		The big drops are surrounded by huge undercut bluffs 
		that look like a backdrop to an Anasazi village. After 
		Snake Eyes there is constant class III until the biggest
		drop is encountered: the Mammer Jammmer.  This class IV+
		monster is a 20-25' drop that begins as a vertical 10' 
		drop before landing on a 60 degree angle slide.  At 
		low water levels the majority of water flows over the 
		right side of the drop producing a vertical drop that 
		crashes onto a rock shelf.  The drop is not safely 
		runnable on the right line at any level! The optimal 
		route is the far left where the water has worn a "V" in 
		the lip of the drop, followed by a steep slide to the 
		bottom. No mater what line is used, boofing the drop is 
		not a good idea at all.  Mammer Jammer is follwed by one 
		a good class III drop called "Sycamore".  This one consists 
		of a double drop connected by a slide. Watch out for the 
		sycamore tree at the bottom of the first drop; the only
		route shoots you directly into the giant undercut roots 
		of the Sycmore.  If you don't get pinned on the roots 
		you're off to a nice ride down the slide/drop. This is 
		followed by one of the most beautiful corridors of 
		hanging plants/waterfalls in the Ozarks. The rapid under 
		this natural wonder is named "Bobsled", since it feels 
		like running a bobsled track through an ethereal setting. 
		After the big drops above, the rest of the run is cake,
		with lots of fast class III drops to paddle. When you
		get to Mill Cr., it will be big and bad, like a high 
		water run on the Hailstone with huge waves. There are
		also many surfing opportunities on the paddle out, with
		dozens of Lee Cr. style surfing holes and waves.  You'll
		probably be completely worn out when you reach the 
		take-out bridge.  Mormon is a tiny little creek that
		does some big things when it comes to slides and 
		waterfalls.  Like Horsehead Cr. and Rattlesnake Hollow, 
		the biggest challenge for a paddler will be stopping.  
		If the water level is very high at all, you may not 
		be able to stop if there is a tree down in the creek,
		or you may be swept over a drop you'd rather not run.
		Make sure you're comfortable paddling this type of
		sub-micro steep creek before you put on.

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Mulberry R.

	Rating: II
	TDCR: 2314
	Location: Newton, Johnson, and Franklin Co.;
		S1: Take Hwy. 23 north of Ozark form I-40.  Put-in at Wolf Pen
			Recreation Area on NFR 1003 east of Hwy. 23.  Take out
			at Redding Campground on NFR 1003.  (Alternate take out
			is Byrd's Campground east of Redding.)
		S2: Take out at Hwy. 23 bridge.
		S3: Take out at Milton Ford on NFR 1501 west of Hwy 23.
		S4: Take out at Hwy. 215 bridge north of Mulberry.
			(Alternate take out is dirt road south of Shores L.)
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Oark, Yale, Cass, Watula, Cravens, Mountainburg SE
	Gradient: S1: 20 fpm
		  S2 - S4: less than 15 fpm
	Length: S1: 15 mi.
		S2: 4 mi.
		S3: 9 mi.
		S4: 20 mi.
	Season: SPRING, FALL, WINTER
	Gauge: Call the Corps at 501-324-5150 for a reading.  Should be
		between 2.0 and 5.0 ft. for a safe run.  Also call
		Turner's Bend Store at 501-667-3641 for a reading.
		LINK TO USGS GAUGE
	Hazards: minor strainers, fast current
	Description: Not enough can be said about this beautiful class II
		river in the heart of the Ozarks.  I won't attempt to
		describe the entire river here, but Kennon's "Ozark
		Whitewater" guidebook is a great source for information.
		S1 is a bit tougher than the remainder of the river, and 
		it can approach class III in difficulty in very high water.  
		Most of the time the river is suitable for beginning 
		canoeists with some whitewater experience.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Mystery Cr. (aka Sandy Springs Hollow)

	Rating: IV+ (V) *
	TDCR: ????
	Location:  Newton Co.; To reach the put-in go south from
		Deer on Hwy 16 then turn right just past Deer Church on
		outskirts of town.  After about 2 miles, turn right again on
		smaller dirt road descending a hill. Go straight to hit 
		creek directly, or turn left and follow road that parallels
		creek until it ends.  For directions to take-out, see EFLB
		description.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Deer, Swain, Murray
	Gradient: 190 fpm  (1/2 mi @ 320 fpm)
	Length: 9.8 mi. (this includes 8 miles on normal EFLB run)
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Must have mucho big rains for this one.  The EFLB takeout
		should be roaring.
	Hazards: difficult rapids, strainers, waterfalls
	Description: The designation "Mystery Creek" for this extreme upper
		section of the EFLB began as an inside joke because when this
		run was first being considered, the name of the creek was not
		divulged even to close friends until the day of the run.
		It is often called "Sandy Springs Hollow" these days,
		since that's the name of the small hollow at the put-in.
		It is believed that the first run putting in at 
		elevation 1840 ft occurred on November 14, 1993.  The 
		first descent party included David Bibbs, Don Calaway, 
		Cowper Chadbourn, Charles Chevaillier, Bill Keathley,
		Jim McDaniel, Ted Smethers, and Gil Wooten, all in kayaks.
		An early put in is strongly advised.  The first descent
		ended well after dark, leading to interesting conversations
		with locals and forcing some late night hiking along the roads
		that parallel the lower portion of the EFLB run. Due to 
		the gradient and tiny watershed, water levels can fall before 
		you complete the upper section.  The creek starts out with 
		some fast but easy slides.  A class III ledge adds some 
		excitement before the creek is choked by boulders into 
		a much more serious rapid. At lower water, pins are 
		likely here and for the next half mile or so.  At higher 
		water, a downed tree will be life threatening in the 
		extremely high gradient. The highlight of the run 
		is "Rooster's Two Step", named for the 3 ft step above 
		the 12 ft waterfall, first run by David Bibbs, AKA "The Rooster".  
		The approach is a blind curve to the left with one potential
		eddy on the right side of the curve.  If you boat around the 
		corner, hang on tight!  After the "Rooster" the gradient is
		serious and the rocks are big and often ugly.  Several
		bad sieves appear at low levels, making for mandatory
		portages.  Higher water opens things up, but it can be
		hard to slow down and a flip will result in a serious
		beating.  When the main EFLB stem comes in from the right,
		the gradient backs off, but with the added flow, there
		are several spots with sycamores that present serious
		hazards.  Scout anything you can't see until you reach
		the normal EFLB put in.  The EFLB will be big and brawny
		at these levels - possibly the wildest part of your day!
		Sandy Springs is as difficult a steep creek as the Ozarks 
		has to offer and it requires a much greater skill level 
		than the EFLB run itself does.  It rates right up there 
		with the hardest Ozark hair runs.  If there's any doubt
		put in on the EFLB.  Thanks go to Cowper Chadbourn for 
		information on the creek!

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Osage Cr.

	Rating: III-IV
	TDCR: 7666
	Location: The put-in is located just north of Compton, AR in the
		northwest corner of Newton Co. Take Hwy. 43 north from
		Compton about 1/2 mile and take the first dirt road to the
		left. There is a sign for an iron works place at the turn
		off. The put-in bridge is about 1/2 mile down this. ASK FOR
		PERMISSION to park near the bridge. The owners of the house
		near the bridge are extremely nice, and they generally don't 
		mind boaters parking there if they ask to do so. To reach the 
		take-out bridge, go across the creek and take a right. 
		You'll climb a hill and go about 2 miles before taking 
		another right. Go about 3 miles to the small burg of Delmar 
		and take another right at the intersection. You'll cross 
		a small low water slab and go about one more mile to a 
		small bridge across Osage. Park near the bridge and don't 
		block the road. 
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Ponca, Osage NE
	Gradient: 80 fpm (first 2 miles @ 130 fpm)
	Length: 6 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Osage is probably runnable when the Buffalo R. is about six
		inches or more over the Ponca low water bridge, but the watersheds
		are not very close, so Osage can be up when the upper Buffalo isn't
		that high. The best place to gauge the stream is at the put-in. 
		If the first ledge below the bridge has water across most of the
		ledge (between the big bush and the left bank) then the run is
		good to go. If the first ledge is wall-to-wall muddy water and 
		the hole there looks really bad, the run through the gorge will 
		be extremely dangerous, sporting some of the worst keepers in 
		the state. You can also predict the levels using the Buffalo R. 
		river and rain gauges which are linked below.  The Compton rain
		gauge is in the Osage Cr. watershed, and it will usually
		take an inch-an-hour rate of rain to bring the creek up.
		LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)				
	Hazards: big drops, undercuts, boulder sieves, hydraulics,
		strainers, a fence in the last two miles
	Description: Osage Cr. is a gem of an Ozark creek run. With a
		short shuttle, easy access, a good watershed, A+ scenery, and
		a 2 mile gorge boxed in by bluffs and chock full of class
		III+ rapids, what's not to love? The first attempts
		at running the creek were made in the late 1970's
		by some of the BOC crew who were bored with the
		Hailstone, and it was re-explored in April of 1997 by Bill 
		Herring, Howell Cox, and Jim Jernigan when all rapids were 
		run. This run is tougher than the average gradient would seem
		to indicate. You know you're not dealing with the average
		Ozark creek when you see the put-in. The run starts off
		with a bang by dropping over a big rapid called Starting
		Gun 15 yards below the bridge. This seven foot class III
		fall will give you some idea of what is comming up
		downstream. If this rapid gives you pause, don't venture
		into the gorge below. It only gets tougher as you go down.
		Another 40 yards brings you to Old Mill Falls, an eight
		foot sheer plunge over an old dam. The landing is fairly
		shallow, but it is easy to boof the drop on the right. For
		the next 1/8 mile the creek tries to lull you to sleep
		with some tight class II+ drops. When the drops start
		picking up steam a little, the first class IV drop comes
		into view. Bottleneck is a straight shot down the middle
		of a churning sluice. The entrance rapid is class III, and
		there is little room to stop before you go into the
		maelstrom below. The line is obvious and not too hard to
		make, just don't get upside down - there are several nasty
		rocks under the surface. A very blind and tight class III+ 
		drop follows Bottleneck and then the next class IV is reached.
		Howler is a complex drop which requires some tricky
		maneuvering to reach the final slot drops. The bottom drop
		is split: the right has a rooster tail in the middle and
		the left has a chance for a vertical pin. Howler
		definitely warrants some careful scouting or maybe a
		portage, both of which are best done on river right. After
		several back to back class III to III+ drops, you come to
		a long rapid that looks like a good place for a scout. Get
		out on the right bank and walk down to take a look at the
		biggest rapid on the run, Magic Mushroom (aka Moon Landing). 
		The Mushroom starts off with a long class III+ entrance which 
		dumps out onto a sloping shelf. With few good eddies to
		catch, the creek screams down the shelf for about 30 yards. 
		At the end of this shelf the creek is confined between sheer
		rock walls on either side and it drops about seven feet onto
		another shelf. At moderate levels, most of the water is
		channeled over a sloping ledge to the left. The water
		banks off the left wall and pushes to the right below the
		drop into a huge, slightly undercut boulder. The slide below
		the big drop continues for over 50 yards around the corner. A
		huge mushroom shaped rock overhangs the stream on the left
		below the drop, providing for some of the strangest
		scenery in the Ozarks. At most levels the Mushroom is a
		long class IV drop, but at really high levels the combination 
		of the tricky entrance and the thundering main falls may 
		push it to class V difficulty. Scouting and portaging here 
		can be very difficult, but a scout is needed. It is
		best scouted on the right, but the best portage route is
		on the left, up and over the bluff and back down at the
		end of the rapid. After the Mushroom, the creek drops
		through myriad class III and III+ drops. At least two of 
		these cannot be navigated completely at lower levels. One has 
		a good looking entrance only to wash out into a boulder
		sieve. Scout anything that you can't clearly see in this 
		section. Another nice class III+ drop is encountered near a 
		dramatic double cascade comming in on river right. Several more 
		class III's lead up to the final class IV drop. Switchback is 
		a powerful "S" turn compressed into the space of just a few
		yards. It may not be as bad as it first appears, but a mistake
		can result in a dangerous pin on the numerous rocks. Be confident
		of making the required move or take the easy portage to the 
		left. Below Switchback the action slows down a bit, but several 
		good class III's remain. With the added flow from dozens of 
		tributaries, some of these contain some fairly sticky hydraulics, 
		so don't become too complacent. Finally the gorge recedes and 
		the rapids moderate to continuous class II+ for the last few miles. 
		There are still many bad strainers and one badly placed
		wire fence to negotiate, so stay on your toes until you get 
		to the takeout bridge. If you tackle Osage Cr., be sure that 
		you have solid class IV boating skills. Even at lower levels, 
		the creek can be pushy and it is incredibly blind from the 
		cockpit of a kayak. The rapids are fast, powerful, and very 
		rocky, making the penalties for mistakes quite high. At higher 
		levels the rapids grow exponentially in power and danger. With 
		enough water to make the first hydraulic really bad, the gorge 
		is transformed into a very pushy, blind class IV+ run. Runs
		of the creek often produce broken paddles, side pins, vertical 
		pins, lost skin, and bruised egos.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Possum Walk Cr.

	Rating: IV-V (P)
	TDCR: 8966
	Location: To reach the put-in go 0.25 miles North from Drasco
		(intersection of Hwy 5/25 and 92) on Hwy 5/25. Continue
		North on Five Mile Road 1.75 miles to the first bridge.
		Please park on the South side of the bridge. To reach the
		take-out, go approximately 6 miles West from Drasco on
		Hwy 92 turn North on Hwy 263. Go 1.5 miles and park at
		the Public Access on the North side of the bridge over
		Greers Ferry Lake.
	Topo Quad(s): Drasco and Prim 
	Gradient: 100 fpm (3/4 mile at 200+ fpm)
	Length: 2.4 mi (plus a few miles on Racoon and Beech Fork Creeks)
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: No official gauge. Look for 1.5" or more rain in the area.
		Rain must have fallen within the last 6 to 12 hours. If the
		bottom bar on the white water-fence at the put-in bridge is
		partially underwater, it's a definite run.  It should really
		look fairly low at the put-in for a good level.  If there's
		water filling most of the streambed under the bridge, the
		gorge will be extremely dangerous, and waiting for the water
		level to drop may be the only good option.
	Hazards: Undercut ledges and rocks, overhanging branches, strainers.
		Very tight in places (some very nasty pinning hazards).
		"Possum Hole" is a portage at higher water. 
	Description: First known descent was January 22, 1999 by Randall
		Gammill, Lance Jones, Chris Anderson, Cowper Chadbourn,
		Bill Herring, Steve Robertson, Zack Smith and Billy
		Williams. Don't let the 100 fpm gradient fool you, that's
		for the full 2.5 miles of the creek. The first 3/4 mile is
		only 25 fpm. The meat of the run has a 3/4 mile section at
		200 fpm, within lies a 1/4 mile section at 270 fpm and a
		maximum gradient around 310 fpm. The first 0.75 miles
		consists of a flat water warm up with a few riffles,
		followed by a couple of actual small rapids. Then the
		first notable drop: a little straight forward slide over
		some smooth boulders. Now the meat begins. The next drop
		is the "Possum Pinch", fast current that is pinched into a
		slot just a few inches wider than a boat. The pool below
		the pinch marks the start of the "big five". 
		The first one, "Road Kill" is a short complex drop of about
		10-12 feet, which ends in a nasty slot. The best option is to
		portage over the right ledge and run the sneak around the bottom
		on the right. The second is a tight sluice into an S-turn. Enter
		the sluice, avoid the first pin rock turn hard right over the
		drop and avoid the second pin rock, then finish with a hard
		left over the bottom of the drop. The third drop is
		immediately below. A huge undercut boulder forces the current
		far left and creates an eddy to the right. Watch out for the
		vortex sucking things under the boulder. A hard turn to the
		right around the boulder and off a steep 6 ft drop, followed
		with a small drop into a small eddy-pool. The fourth drop, "Possum
		Stew" is a long complex rapid with several rocks and holes to
		negotiate with a 5-6 foot drop in the middle. This drop
		was portaged by all during the first descent due to a
		large tree across the creek. This drop feeds the last of
		the big five, the "Possum Hole". Large boulders block the
		path. The left line is through a pyramid shaped hole (at
		the right water level). The right line requires a hard 90+
		degree turn to the left in front of a killer undercut
		slot (this is one of the worst slots that this boater has
		ever seen). Portage high on the right or climb over the
		log debris on the left and wade through another pyramid
		shaped hole then run the bottom part of the drop. The
		creek continues intensity with some nice rock jumbles,
		slides, and ledges. Notable drops are "Boof and Slide",
		"Snake Eyes" and "Possum Pie", the last being a complex
		drop (boof-slide, dodge, line up, over the 6 ft narrow
		drop, avoid the tree and rock partially blocking the
		outflow). The gradient continues to level off until the
		confluence with Raccoon Creek. Raccoon contains some good
		surf waves and decent current in the pools then joins the
		Beech Fork for some nice volume. Several big waves and big
		pools and one monster hole near the end. Finish with about
		a 3/4 mile paddle across the NE corner of Greers Ferry
		Lake to the Hwy 263 bridge. Like other micro-volume
		creeks, meaningful ratings are difficult to establish on
		the accepted International scale. At lower levels, the
		creek will seem like a very technical class IV, with
		much rock bashing, scraping, and some portages. At higher
		levels, several rapids become solid class V.  At 
		any level, the creek contains many serious hazards, and 
		any paddlers without experience negotiating undercut rocks 
		on tight, steep creeks should think twice before trying to 
		tame the Possum.  Thanks go to Lance Jones and Randall Gammill 
		for information about Possum Walk Creek.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Rattlesnake Hollow

	Rating: IV (V)
	TDCR: 7794
	Location: The put-in is reached by crossing Hurricane Cr. 8 miles
		upstream from Shores Lake on NFR 1003 heading toward
		White Rock Mtn.  Dockery's Gap is fairly close to this crossing.
		After you cross Hurricane (which should be huge and muddy),
		go uphill about one mile until you see a good dirt road
		angling down to the right (this road is not on USGS maps). 
		Follow this small, rough road about a half mile or so 
		until it crosses Rattlesnake Hollow (4WD is a very good idea).
		The best idea in my opinion is to run the creek down to
		where it crosses an old logging road right before it runs
		into Hurricane Cr.  From here, brushwhack up on the left
		side of the creek (the left facing downstream on Rattlesnake),
		angling away from the creek gorge as you go up.  The slope is
		not too bad.  After about 150 to 200 yards (or so) you should
		run into a good dirt road.  Follow this back to the left (back
		toward the creek) and stay on it as it paralells the creek
		gorge and climbs back up to the put-in.  If you don't stop and
		rest too much, you can make it back up in less than 30 minutes
		of easy boat dragging.  If you really want to, set shuttle
		on Hurricane Cr. down near Shores Lake and paddle down the
		8 miles of class II water and trees.  If you take the hiking
		option, Rattlesnake can be run and shuttled in less than
		1.5 hours, giving you time for a second run, either on
		Rattlesnake or on one of the other local creeks.
	Topo Quad(s): Fern
	Gradient: 400 fpm
	Length: 0.6 mi
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: This creek only runs when everything else is in flood.  Putting
		in an no more than an hour after a hard, fast rain (2+" in less
		than 2 hours) is a must to catch it up.  The good news is that 
		you can gauge it by  driving to the put-in.  The bedrock slide
		just upstream of the put-in road should have water spreading
		across it for a good solid run.  Everything but the first
		waterfall can be gotten down with even less water.  If there's not
		quite enough water, simply drive over to nearby Little Mill 
		or Spirits creek for a good run on one of those.
	Hazards: one big waterfall, downed trees, and continuous water
	Description: This strange little creek would probably have never been run
		if the USFS had not made its rather unpopular decision to sell off 
		some timber around Hurricane Cr. and Whiterock Mtn. in 1998.
		When they did this, they cut a road into this previously
		inaccessible hollow.  As if they had consulted a group of
		paddlers when they did it, they chose to cross the hollow
		about a half mile above Hurricane Cr., right above a 25+ foot
		waterfall.  As a result, it was run by Bill Herring and Trey
		Marley in June of 2000.  The short run is easy to describe: about
		100 feet of fast water leads to a 25 foot sheer plunge into a 
		small 6 foot deep pool after which a rapid starts and doesn't stop 
		for about 1/2 mile.  Then you pull out and carry back up a gentle
		slope for about 150 yards to the road where you can drag 
		back up to the put-in in less than 30 minutes.  The waterfall is
		potentially the highlight of the run, but like all big falls, it
		can be dangerous as hell.  The first (and to date the only) attempt
		to run it resulted in a piton into the gravel at the bottom.
		This author can attest that the impact can be severe.  The
		problem with this fall is that water is spread out thinly over
		the uneven lip of the drop.  It's very easy to hang up on the
		take-off resulting in a vertical landing in shallow water.
		If your boat is longer than 5 feet, you're gonna stop very, very
		abruptly!  At very high levels, the fall may be more cleanly 
		runnable, but you're guinea-pigging it if you try.  Obviuosly
		this fall should be scouted carefully both from the top and bottom
		before any future attempts.  The pool below the fall is small and
		it's washout is blocked by a tree, so you'll probably need to
		portage at the bottom whether or not you run the fall.  From here 
		the creek starts dropping and doesn't stop.  If you can pick out
		individual drops, all but one of them are probably class III.
		But a severe shortage of boat sized eddys makes everything just
		blend into one long class IV rapid.  If a tree is down (very
		likely) stopping before you hit it will be very interesting
		(the creekbed is so narrow that grabbing a rock or tree on the
		bank is probably the best way to slow down).  The crux of the 
		run is a solid class IV drop over multiple ledges about halfway
		down.  This one pinned a boater on the first descent as his 
		boat disapeared completely into a crevice in the rocks.  
		Really, it's pointless to describe any of the drops.  If 
		you are really sure you want to run it, strap your 
		seatbelt on below the big fall and just hang on until you 
		reach the bottom!  Depending on your sense of adventure 
		and the water level, you'll either be completely exhilarated 
		or terrified by the time Hurricane Cr. comes into view.  
		If the water is high, hiking it on foot first is probably 
		the best way to stay out of serious trouble (it's a terrific
		short hike when it's dry).  Rattlesnake is a crazy, tiny little 
		creek that only a crazy creek boater can appreciate.  If that 
		describes you, enjoy!		

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Richland Cr.

	Rating: S1: III-IV
		S2: II-III
	TDCR: 6656 (S1)
	Location:  Newton and Searcy Co.;
		S1: Take Hwy. 65 north of Conway from I-40 and then Hwy.
			16 west of Clinton to Ben Hur. then NFR 1203
			north to low water bridge at put-in.  Take out at
			Richland Cr. campground north of Hwy. 16 on
			NFR 1205.
		S2: Take out by driving north of Richland Cr. Campground on
			NFR 1205 and then turn north on NFR 1201 and go to
			Stack Rock.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Moore, Eula
	Gradient: S1: 55 fpm (some sections approach 80 fpm)
		S2: 20 fpm
	Length: S1: 6 mi.
		S2: 10 mi.
	Season: FALL and SPRING
	Gauge: Low water bridge at the put-in should have between
		18 and 5 in. of airspace showing.  Richland Campground bridge
		should have 3 to 1 ft of airspace.  The ACC Bulletin Board
		gauge should read between 3.5 and 5.0 ft.  A level of 3.3 on
		the the Corps On-Line gauge (follow link below) 
		corresponds to approx. 12 in. of airspace at put-in bridge.
		Levels over these maximum limits easily push the creek into 
		the class IV-V range.  You can also predict the levels using
		the Buffalo R. rain gauges which are linked below.
		LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)				
		LINK TO USGS GAUGE
	Hazards: dangerous rapids, undercut rocks, bad hydraulics
	Description: S1 is one of the premier advanced whitewater runs in
		the state.  The first mile is relatively calm but the next
		five contain several class III-IV rapids including a six
		foot drop at Richland Falls and others such as Crack in
		the Rock (III+), Knuckle Buster (III+), Upper Screw Up (III),
		Lower Screw Up (AKA Shaw's Folly) (IV), and Maytag (III).  The
		most dangerous drop is Lower Screw Up which has a badly undercut
		rock in the far right hand slot which is the preferred entrance
		to the rapid, but many of the other rapids can be rough on an 
		inverted paddler (especially at lower levels).  At higher 
		levels the water volume and steep gradient can be a very 
		dangerous combination making for a solid class IV-V run (if
		Richland is too high try Falling Water Cr to the south). A hike
		up to Twin Devils Fork falls (below Richland Falls) provides
		some extra scenery, and the rest of the run is very scenic, but
		it's hard to take your eyes off of the rapids!  Only confident
		intermediates to expert boaters should attempt upper Richland.
		Be sure you have the requisite eddy hopping, ferrying, and 
		rolling skills or you may be doing more hiking than boating. 
		S2 is more tame, but still provides plenty of good action in
		the first few miles.  The end of this stretch is relatively
		flat as it approaches the Buffalo R.

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Rock Creek

	Rating: II-III *
	TDCR: 4464
	Location: From I-40 take Hwy 215 (the Mulberry exit) north approx.
		3.5 miles and turn left (west) just before you cross over 
		Mill Cr. Stay on the main road always going west until you 
		reach the four-way at Piney.  Turn left (west) and go about 
		a mile until the road T's.  Take a right and go another mile 
		until you come to a bridge. This is the put-in.  To get to 
		the take-out, go back to the T in the road and continue
		straight (south) at the T.  Follow this road until you reach 
		another intersection.  Hang a right and go about one mile to
		the creek.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Mountainburg SE
	Gradient: 75 fpm
	Length: 2.75 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: The Mulberry should be flooded (7+ ft on the gauge).  This
		creek requires some serious rainfall to come up.
	Hazards: strainers, undercuts
	Description: First descent on this creek was on 2/21/97, just before
		a run on Little Mill Cr. to the east.  The group was made
		up of ten boaters: Steve Robertson, Landon Colwell, Alex
		Woolworth, Zen Boulden, Richard Haley, Kent Peetz,
		Josh Webster, Eddie Cross, and a guy named Tim.  The first 1/4
		mile of the creek is clogged with strainers, but there is a
		good trail on river right to get around the trees.  But the
		next mile is well worth the trouble, dropping 100 ft. in
		a nice gorge.  Class II to III rapids are encountered with
		no pools to slow things down.  Many strainers and some
		undercuts may also be encountered so be sure to stay on your
		toes.  The very continuous nature of the run makes the
		hazards much more dangerous than they would be elsewhere.
		This creek lies somewhere between the Salt Fork and Spirits
		Cr. in overall difficulty and excitement.  It's a good training
		ground for would be steep creekers who have the skills to
		handle the pushy, narrow rapids.  If you don't then consider
		Hurricane Cr. or the Salt Fork which are only a few minutes
		drive to the east.  Thanks go to Steve Robertson for 
		information on this run.  

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Roger's Private Idaho

	Rating: II
	TDCR: ????
	Location: From Poughkeepsie (Sharp County), go north on Highway 58
		approximately 1-2 miles. Look for a county road sign
		marking Hulett Road on the left. There is also single house
		on the left side jsut north of the road. Take this left and
		go about 1 mile to low-water bridge.  Park on river left
		side.  Please help keep this area clean when visiting!
	Topo Quad(s): N/A
	Gradient: N/A
	Length: Park and Play
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: The USGS Strawberry River Gauge near Poughkeepsie should be above 2.5
		for a low surfable level on the wave.  Above 3.7 the surfing is best.
	Hazards:  Initial inspection shows no rebar as wave is made solely
		by existing bedrock. May be shallow at some levels so watch your head.
	Description: This is a great park and play wave located just 
		downstream of the low-water bridge on the Strawberry R.
		The wave is relatively wide with a foam pile at levels of 4 feet
		and above on river right with glassy surface on the left. Two large 
		eddies on either side provide plenty of recovery and room to wait in 
		line. The wave train below the surfing wave has some smaller waves
		that some might find entertaining. Higher levels make for
		ideal conditions for kayaks and expert open-boaters. As
		the level drops, it becomes friendlier to less-skilled
		boaters.  Thanks to Roger Head for information on his great
		play wave!

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Salt Fork

	Rating: II-III
	TDCR: 4454
	Location: Take Hwy. 215 (Mulberry exit) north from I-40 to Shores
		Lake. Go south of the lake, cross Hurricane Cr., and
		continue uphill past the dam and lake overlook. Take a left
		(north) at the first four way intersection and drive three
		miles. Take a left at the second four way intersection and
		drive two more miles to a low water bridge at the put-in.
		The take-out is back at Shores L. Try to take out on the
		north end of the lake to avoid as much flat water as
		possible. With a little quick shuttling, you may be able to
		catch Spirits Cr. or Hurricane Cr. after you take off,
		assuming the Salt Fork didn't completely wear you out.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Bidville
	Gradient: 75 fpm
	Length: 4 mi.
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: The only way to be sure is to check at the put-in bridge.
		The first ledge on Hurricane Cr. below Shores L. bridge should
		be covered completely, and the Mulberry should probably be 
		over 6 ft.
	Hazards: Numerous tree strainers and willow jungles. Scout all blind
		curves! 
	Description: This great little run is one of the best kept secrets in
		the Ozarks. Fast paced class II+ rapids characterize the
		majority of the run, but there are a few legitimate III's
		at any level and the majority of the run may be pushy III
		at higher water. Great surfing opportunities abound in
		the second half of the run. In some places there are four
		or five good surfing holes separated by only a few yards.
		But don't get too relaxed by all of that playing, because
		there are a few spots with some nasty strainers. Be
		extremely careful around willow jungles and blind turns.
		Some of the most challenging rapids and the best scenery
		occur right at the end of the run, and then the feisty
		little Salt Fork disappears under Shores Lake. You can take
		out anywhere on the lake, but it's best to drive to the
		picnic areas on the north side. Just make sure you don't
		paddle over the 30 ft. dam on the south end. The fall
		won't kill you but the landing might. Salt Fork is a good
		run for paddlers comfortable on tight, fast class III
		water. If you can't maneuver in these conditions, try a
		run on Hurricane creek on the other side of Shores Lake.

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Shop Cr.

	Rating: III-V *
	TDCR: 8878
	Location:  Newton Co.;  Take USFS Road 1206D (unmarked dirt road) 
		north of Hwy. 16 from Deer till you pass Alum Cove.  Before 
		you reach Wayton, there are two dirt roads in quick succession
		that head west (to the left).  Shortly after these a single
		dirt track heads due east at a 90 deg. angle to the main road.
		Take this road and drive about 1/2 mile then walk the trail
		leading downhill and to the east 1/2 mile.  When you reach 
		the bottom of the gorge head left and you will intersect the
		creek.  This is the put-in.  Take out at the bridge south of
		Parthenon.  (NOTE: the creek is labeled as West Fork Shop Cr.
		on my Parthenon topo quad.  Spellings of "Shop" Cr. may vary.)
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Deer, Parthenon
	Gradient: 120 fpm (upper gorge is 200 fpm)
 	Length: > 6 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: The EFLB should be flooded for a run on Shop Cr.  A put in soon 
		after very heavy rainfall is required for a run.
	Hazards: Strainers, tight and technical drops, undercuts
	Description: Shop Cr. was first run by Randy Jackson and Robert
		Handford in March 1988.  It has been run only a few times since. 
		It is a very steep, tight, technical run with solid, continuous 
		class III-IV rapids in the upper 200 fpm section.  Big rocks
		form big, continuous drops with lots of hazards.  Major drops 
		include (but are not limited to): Hypermart (IV), Checkout Line
		(V), Blue Light Special (III+), Express Lane (III), No Refund
		(III), and Thanks for Shopping (III+).  Above and between
		Hypermart and Checkout Line the creek is nearly continuous
		class III+.  All boaters should have very, very
		advanced skills and be confident on tight class IV+ water.
		Be prepared for severe consequences if you underestimate the
		difficulty of this run or overestimate your skill.  A high water
		trip in June, 2000 resulted in several very good paddlers walking
		out of the gorge, and one needing dental work.  Be careful out
		there. Thanks to Shelby Johnson for information on this creek.

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Smith Cr.

	Rating: III-V
	TDCR: 8986
	Location: Newton Co.; Two put-ins are possible.  The first of these is
		off of Shiloh Rd. that turns East off of Hwy. 21 near Mossville (this
		is the road the the EFLB takeout).  Follow this road for a short
		distance until you come to a USFS timer cutting area on the right
		(look for the signs).  If you cross a cattle grate you've gone too
		far.  Park on the right in the timber cutting area, and hike down to
		the creek on the left had side of the road (also USFS land).  The hike
		is almost 1/4 mile and is way downhill.  Once you get down, you'll darn
		sure be running the creek!  A much better put-in is found by taking the
		second dirt road to the left after passing the Hwy. 21 Smith Cr. 
		bridge on your way south to Mossville.  (NOTE: This put-in is private 
		property but the owners don't mind paddlers using it for a put-in when 
		the creek is running.  Please treat the land with great respect and
		pick up any trash you find, so we can make sure the access to this
		great creek run continues.)  Thanks to the owners improving the road, 
		you may be able to drive this road all the way to the creek if 
		you have a high clearance 4WD vehicle.  The first hill is a 
		real doozy to get back up though, so you may want to do a little
		shuttle scouting to be sure you want to try it!  Once down the first
		hill (either in your vehicle or dragging your boat) bear to your 
		right and follow the road to the Southwest.  At the bottom of the
		first hill, another road/trail branches off and goes more steeply 
		downhill and to the Northwest.  This road will take you just below 
		the Lower Gorge and is a good spot to take out.  When you get to the 
		creek you can put in for the Lower Gorge, or you can follow the 
		road upstream over a couple of small tributaries about 1/4 mile to 
		get to the Upper Gorge.  A take-out at the Hwy. 21 bridge is possible
		but not recommended since it requries paddling the lower creek which
		has many fences across it and is surrounded by private land.  Unless
		you can somehow duck the fences, the lower creek cannot be run 
		without portaging, so you'll have to seek permission from
		landowners first.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Boxley, Murray
	Gradient: 130 fpm (upper 2.5 mi. @ 180 fpm)
	Length: 2 to 5 mi. (depending on put-in and take-out)
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Generally 3 to 6 ft of water over the low water bridge over the 
		Buffalo R. at Ponca is a good indicator.  At the Hwy 21 bridge 
		over Smith Cr. no rocks should be visible in the flow near the 
		bridge and the water should be muddy.  The creek is only runnable 
		after extremely heavy local rains.  You may be able to predict the 
		levels using the Buffalo R. rain gauges which are linked below.  
		The Ponca and Buffalo Tower gauges are the ones to watch.  2+ inches
		of rain in a few hours may be enough to produce a good run.  If the
		creek looks flooded at the put-in, it probably is, and you'll be
		portaging class VI nightmares in the gorge if it's that high!
		LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)
	Hazards: strainers, undercut rocks, barbed wire fences (above
		upper gorge and below lower gorge), severe rapids, hydraulics
	Description: First run in May, 1995 by Bill and Chanoy Herring and
		Chris Monroe, this creek has two of the toughest gorges in the 
		Ozarks (the Lower Gorge may have been partly explored as early as 
		1978). The uppermost put-in is a 1/4 mile climb down from a 
		dirt road East of Mossville. From this location the creek drops 
		at a rate of over 180 fpm for the next 2.5 miles with continuous 
		class III rapids and many nasty deadfalls that must be portaged.
		One mile from the upper put-in, the creek drops more than 60 ft.
		in 1/10 mi. and is choked to less than 5 ft. wide by several
		house sized boulders in the stream bed.  The result of this is a
		nasty class V+ gorge!  When you see the creek choking down 
		to a really narrow slot on river left, eddy out immediately 
		and portage on the left (where there is an old roadbed).  
		The first drop is very questionable, and if you accidentally 
		enter this gorge, it may be the last thing you ever run!  One 
		half mile later you'll arrive at the put-in for the lower gorge 
		run.  From this access point to Hwy. 21 is only about 3 miles, 
		but the first of those miles is very intense.  After a half mile of
		fast class III water you'll encounter the Lower Gorge where the creek 
		drops 100 ft. in 1/3 mile.  This gorge features back-to-back class 
		IV-V rapids.  The major rapids encountered in the Lower Gorge
		include: Little Bull (IV), Looking for Trouble (IV),
		Trouble (V+), Crack in the Rock (IV), Gunbarrel (III+),
		Smith Falls (IV+), Box Sluice (III), and Whippersnaper (III).
		All of these rapids have been run at certain water levels,
		but each of them harbors undercut traps.  All should
		be bank scouted very carefully.  Taken as a whole, the 
		Lower Gorge is basically a long class V whitewater rapid.  
		Indeed, at moderate to high water levels, the continuous nature 
		of the rapids from Looking For Trouble down to Smith Falls may 
		commit the paddler to running all of these drops at once.  
		Little Bull pushes 75% of the creek into a big undercut on the
		right, Trouble is basically an undercut rock sieve, Crack in the 
		Rock funnels about half of the water in the creek under and through 
		a big ledge, and a very large undercut just below Smith Falls has 
		already been the site of a near accident.  Needless to say
		you'd better have 100% confidence in your ability to run a
		clean line through these tricky drops!  After the Lower Gorge 
		the creek settles down to a continuous class II-III run until 
		its confluence with the Buffalo R.  Due to private land and
		fencing across the creek (do not try to remove these fences!)
		the creek is not really boatable below the Lower Gorge.
		Take out on the trail at the end of the Lower Gorge and hike
		back up the hill to get to your vehicle.  Smith Cr. is a very 
		serious run due to the extreme hazards encountered in the 
		two inner gorges. The gorges are short, but don't expect to 
		get through or around them quickly.  If you're not a seasoned 
		creek boater, you may find yourself doing a lot of hiking as
		you try to "run" the creek.

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South Fork Little Red R.

	Rating: I-III 
	TDCR: 3355
	Location: Van Buren County;
		S1: On Hwy 16 after going through Alread and Rupert, turn left 
		onto Anchor Rd. just past the Pleasant Grove Church.  When Anchor 
		T's turn right onto Brock Rd., and when Brock splits go right 
		and then onto Moonlight Rd. 2WD's can park up on the hill and drag 
		down. 4WD's can continue down the hill on a woods road to a 
		lower parking area, and then put in on the river at a 4 wheeler 
		crossing at N35 38.537 W092 44.649, take out is on river left at the
		ford below Koown Hollow on FR 1342 at N35 33.193 W092 43.869.
		S2: Put in at FR 1342 crossing below Koone Hollow, or at lower 
		end of Brushy Fork (4wd only), or about a mile downstream on 
		FR 1307 (Slick Rock Road). This road has recently been improved and 
		offers better access for all vehicles, take out on river left at 
		the low water bridge in Gulf Mt. WMA on Cottonwood Rd. at W35 34.275 
		N092 39.762, which runs north south connecting Lo Gap to 
		Gulf Mt. Rd. Warning, the large culverts can trap you at the 
		higher levels.
		S3: Take out at the Lo Gap bridge at N35 34.182 W092 37.286 on 
		river right above the bridge. Landowner permission required, 
		see description below.
		S4: Take out is at Hwy 95 bridge on river right.
	Topo Quad(s): ?
	Gradient: 12 to 66 fpm (depending on section)
	Length: S1: 9 mi.
		S2: 7.0 mi.
		S3: 3.5 mi.
		S4: 5.0 mi.
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: The minimum level on the USGS gauge at Clinton is around 7.0 feet 
		for S1, 6.0 for S2, and 5.5 for S3.  A level check can be made at both 
		the Hwy 95 bridge and at the low water bridge with culverts on
		Cottonwood Rd. At Hwy 95, water should be pooling on river
		right above the bridge where the woods road enters. At the
		low water bridge, 4" of water passing through the culverts
		is the necessary minimum for a S3 put in. 
	Hazards: Downed tree tops, logs, and strainers are likely, one wire 
		cable across creek in S1. 
	Description: The South Fork of the Little Red is a very 
		scenic river loaded with rapids. S1 is very rain 
		dependent and starts off with lots of rock bumping action 
		and a 66 fpm gradient. It's low volume at first, with 
		narrow, technical rapids. The upper run has very few pools,
		and is only suitable for boaters with good boat control, 
		elbow pads, and a sturdy hull. Depending on rainfall, one 
		rapid may be class III. A logged area about 2 miles down 
		is a good place to watch for strainers. At around 4 
		miles, Wilson creek enters from river left and the river 
		picks up speed. About mile 8, hunters have placed a 
		wire cable (N 35 33.725 W 092 44.738) across the creek 
		above Koown Hollow, probably in order to walk across 
		the river during hunting season. Signs of downed cables 
		were also present and should be watched for in this area. 
		The cables we last encountered were about 12" above our heads. 
		A warning sign has been placed on a tree upstream from the 
		cable, and the cable has also been painted. S2 at 7 miles 
		is more pool drop, allowing more enjoyment of the scenery. 
		Around mile 5, as the river turns left, the Root Wad 
		rapid, with a snag waiting at the bottom is located at N35
		33.877 W 092 41.390 and can be trouble. Two miles later
		the low water bridge on Cottonwood Rd. in the WMA is reached. 
		Take out is on river left at the bridge. Be careful, as the
		large culverts can be a trap at the higher levels. S3 flows
		through 3.5 miles of nice scenery and ends by passing
		first by a low water bridge under a historic wooden
		suspension bridge and then under the new CR 9 bridge 
		at Lo Gap. Permission from the landowner at Bear Hole Hollow 
		Farm must be obtained prior to using this location as a take
		out or put in. Do not drive through the gate onto the
		property. Drag your boats in/out instead. S4 offering 5.0
		miles, is more nice scenery at a slower pace with some fun
		rapids, a set of nice surfing ledges, and a few camps
		dotted along the banks. Take out is just above the Hwy 95
		bridge on river right.  Thanks go to Chester for info.
		on this run!

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Spadra Cr.

	Rating: III+ 
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Spadra creek runs through the middle of Clarksville, AR. The
		main take out is in the middle of town where Main Street
		Bridge and Cherry Street Bridge cross the creek. Go down to
		the stone building beside the creek to park your car. To
		get to the put-in, turn at the stop light beside the
		Southern Flames Music Theater and head up toward the
		College of the Ozarks. Right after the College, the road
		splits off.  Take the road to the right and stay on it until
		you cross two bridges. The second bridge goes over Spadra
		creek. This is where the gauge is. You can put in here or
		you can keep going up the road until another road comes in
		on the left. Turn left and go about a mile to the first bridge
		and and take a another left. Go about twenty yards and put in
		on the left side of the road.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Clarksville, Ludwig
	Gradient: 30 fpm
	Length: 8 or 12 mi. (depending on your put-in)
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: There should be at most 4 feet of airspace under the middle
		bridge.  With less than 3 ft. of airspace you should expect
		a very pushy run.  There is also a gauge on the USGS page.
		About 4 ft. is minimal on this gauge, over 6 ft is optimal,
		and over 8 ft. is high and pushy.
	Hazards: willow strainers, keeper hydraulics, low-head dam (near
		the end of the run)  
	Description: Just down from the uppermost put-in you will encounter
		a very nice rapid with good surfing.  After this, you will
		see the bridge. A good hole above the bridge provides an
		excellent opportunely for 360's, but be careful because 
		the hole immediately below is a serious keeper. Next up are 
		some great surfing ledges. After these, the river splits
		as it goes through a reclaimed coal mine. Take the left fork 
		and watch for trees. Soon after this there is a bad willow
		jungle. Stay far right in this jungle and you'll be in good 
		shape. A bit more river will bring you to a house on
		a cliff, where the river pushes up against the cliff.  A
		pourover on river left is a good spot for enders and squirt
		moves.  A long continuous stretch of rapids just upstream
		of the middle bridge ends with Nomie's Rapid (Nomie swam
		this one on a very cold day!).  After the middle bridge
		(the second put-in), you'll have waves, holes, and willows
		for the next 3 miles. After this is Quarter Mile Rapid,
		a long series of waves and holes. At high levels the holes
		are huge and sticky, so stay on your toes here. After a few
		more rapids, you'll encounter a large, ugly willow jungle.
		You can recognize the spot by the camp and water pipe on
		river right. To run the willows, take a left, then another
		left, and finally another left when you see a Chevy with
		a tree sticking through the hood. About a mile after this
		hazard there are a few fences across the creek. Be careful
		around these.  After the fences, you will have a few rapids
		and pools and then an some buildings (an old water plant)
		and an old dam will loom ahead. Take the chute to the right
		around the dam.  The hydraulic below the dam is a death trap
		so be sure you get to the right to avoid it. Next up is
		Water Plant Rapid. It is the biggest on the river and a
		scream at any water level. The next time the river splits
		take a left, and then take a right and cross a big downed
		tree. The take-out is on the right just downstream of the
		two bridges. Also, remember that most of Spadra Cr. is on 
		private land, so respect the rights of local landowners and
		try to keep the creek and the land around it clean. If there
		is very much water at all, all boaters on Spadra should be
		comfortable with big, pushy class III water and big holes
		(similar to the Ocoee R. in Tennessee, but less continuous).
		Thanks to Noah Fraiser and Curtis Milsap for the description
		of this great creek.

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Spirits Cr.

	Rating: III
	TDCR: 5464
	Location: Take Hwy. 215 (Mulberry exit) north from I-40 to Shores
		Lake. Go south of the lake, cross Hurricane Cr., and
		continue uphill past the dam and lake overlook. Take a left
		(north) at the first four way intersection and drive three
		miles. Take a right at the second four way intersection and
		drive a mile to a low water bridge at the put-in.  To reach
		the take-out, go back the way you came and hang a left
		at the first four way (back toward Shores L.).  When you
		reach the next four way (should look familiar) turn left
		and drive one mile to the wooden bridge over Spirits Cr.
		This road is the Capmbell's Cemetery road that goes to Cass.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Bidville
	Gradient: 75 fpm (1st mile @ 100 fpm)
	Length: 4 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: The Mulberry R. gauge should be greater than 8 ft. and Hurricane
		Cr. should look high and muddy.  Runnable only after heavy 
		local rains.
	Hazards: dangerous strainers (esp. in 3rd mile), undercut rock at First 
		Ledge
	Description: This run has continuous class II-III rapids, an extremely
		narrow stream bed (10 - 15 ft wide), and one 12 ft. class III+
		fall (The Funnel at the end of the third mile) that is one of 
		the best drops in the state.  It is highly recommended to
		those who have the skills needed to run the non-stop rapids.
		Strainers are very common, and usually a portage or two will be
		needed. The first 1/4 mile can be scouted from a trail on 
		river right to determine a strategy for approaching First 
		Ledge, a five foot class III drop.  Avoid the eddy on the 
		left below this ledge.  The current flows under a potentially
		hazardous undercut boulder on this side.  The Funnel is the
		highlight of the run.  It is located just after a two ft.
		sloping ledge with a river wide hydraulic.  When the river
		makes a sharp bend to the right, pull out and scout from
		the old road on river right.  The drop here is over ten
		feet, and, although it is easier to run than it first appears,
		it is quite shallow at most levels.  An inverted paddler
		is very likely to lose some skin.  A trail on river right
		makes it easy to carry up and run the big flume again and again.
		Spirits is a great introduction to the tight steep creeks
		of the Ozarks, but the very continuous nature of this run can
		make it dangerous for paddlers with anything less than perfect
		boat control. All boaters should be confident intermediates
		before trying to tackle Spirits Cr.

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Stepp Cr.

	Rating: III-IV+
	TDCR: 8983
	Location: Take-out is reached by turning north onto County Rd. 8, 
		a gravel road leading from Swain at Hwy. 16 to the low water 
		slab over the EFLB near the Murray Community Center. The turn at
		Swain is about one mile east of the intersection where Hwy.
		21 turns north off of Hwy. 16 to go to Boxley - look for a sign
		that advertizes for "Pottery and Gifts". Follow this
		gravel road for a while until it it forks. Take the rougher
		looking, steep dirt road downhill to the right. Continue
		driving through the beautiful country until the road turns
		left alongside the East Fork of the Little Buffalo R. (a
		possible takeout point for that run). If the water is high,
		the East Fork may be up over the road - please don't block
		the road parking as several folks live down in this valley.
		If the EFLB is not covering the road, there is room for
		parking on the opposite side of the road from the creek
		just before you reach the creek crossing. The best put-in
		for the lower gorge is to drive a bit more than 1.5 miles
		back up the hill and look for the turnout to park in on the
		right (again, don't block the road and irritate the
		landowners!). Carry your boat downhill on the road about a
		third of a mile to the second culvert funneling water
		under the road and then start angling downhill away from
		the road.  It's a steep, tough brushwhack, but it's only
		about a quarter mile long.  With some luck you should reach
		the confluence of Gum Br. and Stepp Cr. (hopefully with all
		of your limbs unbroken!). It's an excellent idea to consult
		a topo map (Murray quad) and explore this little hike
		before the day of your run to work out the logistics.
		IMPORTANT NOTE: a small road near the takeout follows the
		EFLB upstream and crosses Stepp Cr., but this is private
		property and the landowner doesn't want visitors - please
		respect his privacy and DO NOT DRIVE UP THIS ROAD. Thanks!
	Topo Quad(s): Murray, Swain
	Gradient: 150 fpm
	Length: 1.5 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Stepp Cr. can generally been run with the EFLB at optimal
		levels or higher. If rain is widespread, a level of 6 feet
		or higher on the USGS Buffalo at Boxley gauge can be a good
		indicator. The National Park Service's Swain and Deer rain
		gauges are great indicators for this run. Look for 1 to 2
		inches in a couple of hours. A quick walk up the road that
		follows the EFLB upstream from the takeout will take you to
		the Stepp Cr. confluence. If there's enough water to run
		this last rapid before the EFLB, then there'll be enough
		water to get down the lower gorge. Don't drive up this road
		or walk any farther than the confluence though as it runs
		through private property. 
		LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)
	Hazards: Continuous severe rapids, undercuts, trees, and sieves.
	Description: The difficult access to Stepp Cr. led to it being first
		run somewhat accidentally on November 29, 2004. Bill
		"Fish" Herring and Ryan Center hiked in with boats
		thinking they would drag down the creek at sub-minimal
		water levels only to be pleasantly suprised. Stepp Creek's
		lower gorge starts at the Gum Br. confluence and the
		action doesn't let up for more than a mile. With a
		relatively large watershed and long, rocky drops, Stepp
		compares to its eastern cousin, Bobtail Cr. Both creeks
		have good rapids even at low levels, and such levels on
		these creeks happen surprisingly often. In fact, not much
		more rainfall is required to run Stepp Cr. than for the
		EFLB itself. At higher water levels, Stepp's gorge 
		ratchets up into the class IV+ range in a hurry. With 
		enough water the nearly continuous, big drops will challenge
		even the most experienced steep creek boater. The first
		drop in the gorge is called "Double Bubble" - a blind
		chute on the right leads to a boulder that can be avoided with
		a hard cut to the left. Those new to the creek may want 
		to scout this drop and possibly several more below it. 
		The water doesn't stop moving for the next quarter mile. 
		Next is "Thighmaster", named for Ryan Center's bruised 
		upper leg after swimming the log-choked river-left 
		sluice on the first descent.  This one can be snuck 
		with a good ferry to the far right slot.  The left 
		side is a Z-shaped slot that features a wicked hole
		that tends to backender anything that passes through it.
		The hole recirculates under the rock on the right and
		then the backwash kicks out into another undercut
		straight ahead.  If it sounds bad, it typically looks 
		and boats even worse!  Scout this one carefully and set
		good bank support on the left before trying the sneak
		or a run of the main slot.  The creekin continues with
		a couple of long drops followed by another slot drop
		into a surging, boxed-in hole.  This is "The Chute"
		and it is another great spot to set a rope.  A short
		pool leads to a ledge hole that is the start of Stepp
		Creek's biggest rapid: "Eight Seconds".  Like riding 
		an angry bull, a good run in this class IV+ drop will 
		take about 8 seconds.  A bad line will take considerably 
		longer trying to escape from holes and pin-rocks!  Runs
		tend to disintegrate here about four or five moves down
		from the top hole.  A number of folks have been thrown
		off the bull and had some rough rides to the bottom.
		The next major drop is called "Pac Man":
		a big boof that kisses the rock is possible on the left or
		take the twisting route through boulders on the right.
		Look back upstream at this one - a very cool looking drop!
		Several more class III+ and IV drops follow, but the pace
		slows down to a more managable speed after Pac Man. The
		scenery is fantastic if you can take your eyes off the
		rapids!  If you can find it, there's even a wonderful
		creek boat ender spot near the bottom of the run - a 
		great way to finish your trip!  When you see a field on 
		your right, the banks are private property, so don't 
		get out of your boat and float through quietly so as 
		to not disturb the landowner who lives there. At the 
		confluence with the EFLB, hang a left through the bushes 
		(it's quite possible to swim here!) and paddle 100 yards 
		to your vehicle. Another run on Stepp is possible (known
		as "doing the two Stepp"), or you can head up the EFLB 
		or over to Thomas Cr. for some more creekin' action! 
		Stepp's lower gorge is a great creek run that has serious 
		hazards, especially when the holes are churning at 
		higher levels - all paddlers need to be able to handle 
		continuous class IV+ water and organize bank support. 
		If you're not prepared, it may give you more excitement 
		than you want!

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Sulphur Creek (Richland)

	Rating: IV-V+ *
	TDCR: ????
	Location: There are many Sulphur Creeks in Arkansas; this is the one
		in the Richland Cr. watershed downstream of Bobtail Cr.
		Reach the put-in by going North on Hwy 377 from Witts
		Springs about 3 miles to the edge of the community of Magic
		Springs turn left on a dirt road. Take the first fork right
		and the second fork left (90 degree turns). Go about 3/4 mile
		look for a 4WD drive road to the right (should be on
		National Forest land now). Road ends very shortly at a
		small partial clearing with several berms. Park and drag
		down the ATV/Horse trail past the NF gate until the trail
		turns sharply to the left. Bushwack downhill, due North, or
		follow the first rivulet from the trail. Put-in on the
		South fork of the creek 0.25 above the confluence with the
		West fork. (elv. 1300 ft). Take out is at Richland Cr.
		Campground. If the water is high (very likely) may consider
		accessing from the East. Go North on 377 to Snowball and
		follow Point Peter road to Richland Creek. 
	Topo Quad(s): Eula, Moore, Snowball, and Witts Springs
	Gradient: 320 fpm (some sections 500 to 700 fpm)
	Length: 1.5†mi (plus 3.5 mi on Richland Cr.)
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Gauge at Richland Campground needs to be above 6 feet. Look
		for 2" or more rain at the Tilly and surrounding rain
		gages, as posted on the ACC Resource Page. Rain must have
		fallen within the last 6 to 12 hours. 
	Hazards: Undercut ledges and rocks, overhanging branches, strainers,
		waterfalls. With 500 and 700 ft/mile sections, this one is
		steep! Several portages are advised. 
	Description: First known run was April 5, 1997. By Cowper Chadbourn,
		Lance Jones, Greg Churan and Nathan Kline. Sulphur Creek
		doesn't have any monsterly tall drops, just lots and lots
		of 3 to 15 footers. Very blind, very undercut, very tight
		and extremely beautiful. Several drops land on poorly
		padded shelf rock, and one funnels 90% of the water into a
		NASTY undercut cave. Sulphur Creek is 1.5 miles from
		put-in described to Richland Creek, then another 3.5 miles
		to the normal Lower Richland take-out. Average gradient on
		the creek is 350 ft/mile. First mile averages 400 ft/mile,
		with sections approaching 500 to 700 ft/mile. Sulphur
		starts out with a very tight slot move leading to the only
		"waterfall". Run the tight slot in a right hand turn with
		boat on edge (won't go through flat) onto the shelf rock
		and hug as close to the large undercut boulder on the
		right to go over "Sulphur Falls". There is a rock in the
		middle of the pool at the bottom. (I know, because my bow
		found it!) A few more tight boulder jumbles follow until
		the confluence with the West fork. Enjoy this shallow
		pool, because it's the only one you get. The pool feeds a
		two-step stair drop of about 6 feet. Scout the next drop
		from the right. Steep, tight boulder drop with wood in it.
		(at least during our run) After this, it's all a blur
		with too many drops to mention. My advice: SCOUT
		everything you can't see. Some of the drops that stick out
		are Pin-Rock, The Cauldron, The Cave, many good
		slots and boofs, and an 8-10 foot drop onto poorly padded rock.
		One of the last big drops funnels around both sides of a
		10-12 foot boulder into a hole in front of another 5-6 ft
		boulder. Past this one the creek funnels through an
		opening under two very large boulders. Enjoy a flush down
		the remainder of Lower Richland. It is highly recommended
		to hike this creek before attempting a run. Like other
		micro-volume creeks, meaningful ratings are difficult to
		establish on the accepted International scale. At lower
		levels, the creek will seem like a very technical class
		IV-V, with much rock bashing, scraping, and many portages.
		At higher levels, most rapids are expected to become solid
		class V. Make sure you have plenty of experience on other
		Ozark steep creeks before you try to tackle Sulphur, and
		it is a very good idea to hike it before running.
		(Thanks to Lance Jones for information on this creek!)

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Tanyard Creek

	Rating: III-IV (V) *
	TDCR: ????
	Location: The creek is found by taking the Town Center exit off of
		Hwy. 71 North in Bella Vista. Take a left at the light and
		follow the highway. You will go over the Tanyard Creek bridge -
		an optional takeout.  Further up the highway you will
		go up a large hill and there will be a sign on the right
		that says "Lake Windsor Dam".  Turn left there, and follow the
		road to the dam. The creek begins on the east side of the dam
		below the spillway. 
	Topo Quad(s): N/A
	Gradient: 65 fpm
	Length: .75 mi
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Only runnable after very heavy rains.  A good indicator would 
		be flooded ponds on any of the golf courses along Hwy. 71 
		in Bella Vista.
	Hazards: very swift water, boulders, strainers near the bottom 
	Description:  First run on 6/21/2000 by Jason and Robert Bertschy,
		Tanyard Creek is a very short but dangerous creek.  It is a
		class V/IV/III run, in that order.  Fed by Lake Windsor, the 
		whole stretch is only about 3/4 mile, and the intense rapids 
		come in a section only 300 yards long.  The put-in is 
		located a little way down a trail that follows the spillway to 
		the north.  You must drop in off of a large boulder (it will 
		be obvious) to start the run.  The first rapid is a massive
		drop with an extremely shallow landing.  You would
		probably have to be crazy to run this fall since the potential
		for injury appears to be very high.  Next up is Pennyís Plunge, 
		a 8 to 9 foot drop that can easily push you into an undercut 
		ledge on river right (nicknamed "Sideburns"). Pennyís Plunge 
		should be run on the right.  The Plunge can be portaged 
		on the left by following the trail downhill 25 yards. The 
		next rapid, "Gone to Bosnia", signifies that the war has 
		begun.  This is a class IV drop of 5 or 6 ft.  Next, you 
		encounter "Whereíd He Go", a class III+ drop of 4 feet. This 
		drop produces a large hole that can completely swamp a boat.
		After this rapid you have about 40 yards before hitting
		"Headhunter".  This is a class II rapid that runs under a
		bridge which is low enough to take your head off. 
		After Headhunter, the creek slows down and flattens out for
		the remaining 500 yards.  There could be strainers below all the
		action, so scout well before running.  There is NO recovery 
		time on this run, and if you blink you might miss the
		rapids - but they may not miss you.  Only serious boaters 
		should run Tanyard Cr., it is strongly suggested that 
		no one try to run the first drop!  Thanks to Robert Bertschy
		for information about this strange, cool little creek.

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Thomas Cr.

	Rating: III-IV *
	TDCR: 6667
	Location: Newton Co;  Put in is reached by taking Shiloh
		Rd. east of Hwy. 21 just south of Mossville.  Drive for
		0.2 miles and take the small dirt road on the right.  
		Descend the hill keeping to the right all the way down.
		After you pass a small clearing on the left the road switches
		back to the right.  This is a prudent place to park and 
		hike down to the creek (unless you have a really good 4 wheel
                drive and a winch!).  The take out is reached by 
		following the right fork of Shiloh Rd. to the low water slab
                that is the take out for the East Fork of the Little Buffalo.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Murray
	Gradient: 110 fpm  (upper 2 miles at 140 fpm)
	Length: 4.5 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Only runnable after heavy local rains.  The Buffalo should
		probably be two feet or more over the low water bridge at Ponca.
		You may be able to predict the levels using the Buffalo R. rain
		gauges which are linked below.  The Swain and Deer gauges are 
		the ones to watch.
		LINK BUFFALO NATIONAL R. GAUGES (UPDATED HOURLY)
	Hazards: killer attack trees, big drops, high gradient
	Description: First known run of this creek was in March of 1988 
		by Randy Jackson and his gang.  The gradient in the first
                two miles is a steady 140 fpm.  Some big drops are created
                as the boulder choked creek races down a small gorge.  A
                ten ft. fall is encountered near the beginning of the run.
                This fall is very rocky at the bottom, and equipment or
                paddler damage is a very real possibility there.  You can
                portage this one on the left.  The next two miles consist
                of nearly constant tricky class III drops.  Stay on your toes 
		in this section.  At one point a boulder and log sieve makes 
		for a mandatory 200 yard portage, and strainers can easily 
		block the narrow creek almost anywhere.  One of the rapids was 
		dubbed "Action Jackson" in '88 when an undercut on the left of
                a zig-zag staircase drop swallowed Randy Jackson's paddle.
		The paddle was retrieved several days later after the water
                level had dropped.  The gradient continues to produce some
                good rapids until just upstream of the EFLB confluence when
                everything flattens out for the next half mile.  This is
                a fun run for advanced boaters who are used to narrow, high 
		gradient Ozark creeks, but it could be a nightmare for the
		unprepared.  Get very comfortable on runs such as Richland Cr.
		before trying Thomas Cr. 

Return to Index

Upper Ellis Br.

	Rating: III-IV
	TDCR: 7672
	Location: To get to the put-in, take Hwy 170 from West Fork to Devils 
		Den State Park.  Three miles before you reach Devils Den  
		turn right (west) on the Zinamon Church Rd. (unpaved).  
		Follow this road for 1/3 to 1/2 mile and turn left by  the 
		American Trash sign (the second left off of the Zinnamon 
		Rd.).  Go approx. 1 mile down this road and take the 
		first dirt road to the right (if you reach a house you've  
		gone too far).  This road is very rugged and steep and 
		you'll  pass several "NO HUNTING" signs on the way down.  
		It's private land, and getting permission from the hunting
		club that owns it might not be a bad idea.  I spoke with
		a man who lives close to the creek, and he said no one would
		mind, but it never hurts to double check.  Go as far down this
		road as you dare (4WD is mandatory); the road ends very 
		near the creek.  Carry down and put on the creek, or carry 
		downstream on the old roadbed on river left until the creek 
		widens a bit.  When you get past the last big rapids, carry 
		back up the old road on river left.  No shuttle required. 
		If you want an extended run, you can take out at the bridge 
		near Devils Den, just before the creek joins Lee Cr.  It's 
		4.5 miles to the bridge and chock full of trees most of the 
		way.  You can't say you weren't warned.     
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Strickler
	Gradient: 180 fpm
	Length: 0.25 to 0.5 mi. (or 5 mi. to Lee Cr.)
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: None. Only runnable soon after heavy local rainfall.  
		Drive to the put-in or the bridge near Lee to check the creek. 
	Hazards: tight and continuous rapids, overhanging limbs and strainers 
	Description: This small stretch of Ellis Br. was first run in November  
		1996 by Bill Herring and Randy Childers.  The entire creek 
		is runnable, but the most challenging rapids are 
		encountered in the first 1/2 mile.  After that point the 
		gradient diminishes and the trees close in - an 
		unpleasant combination.  The  uppermost part of the creek 
		is very, very narrow and steep, and with enough water (a 
		rare event) the rapids are continuous class III+ for 1/3 
		mile.  After a couple of warm up drops, a large class 
		III+ staircase drop is encountered.  After some serious 
		tree dodging there's another big drop.  This rapid got 
		the name Runaway Rapid when Bill Herring dropped his boat 
		while portaging a tree on the steep left bank above the 
		rapid.  The boat successfully made a first descent of the 
		rapid before it was extracted from the creek.  This rapid 
		is actually a series of falls dropping more than 15 feet. 
		The right side of the second drop is a vertical pin 
		waiting to happen, and the last two drops are the largest 
		and fastest.  Hit an eddy very quickly after Runaway  
		because a deadfall blocks the creek just around the 
		corner.  After quite a bit of fast action another large 
		drop comes into view.  This one consists of a fairly 
		straightforward single drop over a slanting rock.  This 
		is the last of the big drops on the creek, and it may be 
		to bony to run if the water is not high.  Unless the 
		creek is really roaring, it's probably a good idea to 
		pull out on the left just below Runaway, and start the 
		short drag back up to the car.  If you go further down, 
		the gorge gets deeper, making it harder to carry out.  As 
		a result of it's proximity of Fayetteville (35 min) and 
		the potential for a very short but exciting kayak run, 
		Ellis Br. makes a good one to catch when heavy midday 
		rains bring the creeks up but there's not enough 
		daylight for a longer run.  All boaters should be good at 
		rock dodging in tight class III-IV rapids, and a flip 
		could be a very bruising experience.  Pinning is par for 
		the course, but bank support for pinned paddlers is easy 
		to set up ahead of time on this ultra narrow creek. 

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Whistlepost Cr.

	Rating: IV-V (P)
	TDCR: 8995
	Location: Whistlepost is entirely on private land, so be very careful
		to not trespass on your way to the creek. The put-in is
		reached by taking the Winslow exit off of I-540 and heading
		East to Winslow. Just before you drop off the hill into
		town, take a right on a good gravel road. This road is
		Bunyard Rd. which eventually crosses over the freeway
		tunnel. (It's also called Freedom Rd. at it's other end
		that comes out near the Hart Cr. and Ben Doodle Cr.
		put-ins. You can drive in from Chester that way too if you
		prefer.) You'll need to make a right just outside of
		Winslow and a left a while later. Just stay on the best
		road surface if in doubt. After 4.5 to 5 miles of driving
		you'll see a small road turning left with a sign for
		"Morris Taxidermy". Take this road and take the
		first left near a house (the taxidermy shop) about 1/4 mile
		down. You'll go past some fields and finally come to a nice
		gravel driveway leading to a house in a field. Turn right
		at this driveway and follow the dirt road/trail downhill.
		Unless you have a very high-clearance 4WD you'll want to
		find a turnout to park in at this point. The road becomes
		very rough. Either drive or walk downhill on this road
		until you come to a large field on the right. Go just past
		the field and look for a road/trail going left toward the
		creek. Follow this road as it doubles back the way you came
		and eventually paralells the bluffs of the creek gorge.
		Stay on the road until it drops down into a timber cut and
		intersects the creek. Put in on either of the two branches
		which merge just downstream of the put-in. You're standing
		right on the Washington/Crawford Co. line at the put in.
		Don't try to access the put-in from the other side of the
		creek (the left or East side). That road is gated (twice!)
		and posted no trespassing! You can either take out on Clear
		Cr. at Schaberg or at Chester. Schaberg is only 1/2 mile
		down from the Whistlepost and Clear Cr. confluence, and it
		can be reached by taking Schaberg Rd. from old Hwy. 71 at
		the rest stop near Artist Point. Park on the near side
		(river left) of the bridges at Schaberg to avoid annoying
		landowners near the railroad tracks. Going to Chester adds
		another 5 miles of class II-III water (about 1.5 hours when
		Clear Cr. is high) to the trip and provides an easier to
		find take-out.
	Topo Quad(s): N/A
	Gradient: 250 fpm (1 mi @ 350 fpm)
	Length: 2.25 mi
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: This is a very small creek that needs very recent and heavy
		rain to pump it up. 3" of rain no more than 6 hours
		before you get there will probably produce a good run.
		Clear Cr. and McCaslin Br. in Chester should be flooded,
		and Lee Cr. should be heading for a reading of 15+ feet.
		There are two tributaries converging right at the put-in.
		Both should look at least a low-runnable level for a good
		run. If the right trib is flowing over the road into the
		left trib, the run will be very dangerous. No more than 200
		cfs is needed for a solid class IV-V run!
	Hazards: Numerous undercut rocks, downed trees, potholes, strong
		hydraulics, big, continuous rapids. 
	Description: Whistlepost Cr. is probably the best and toughest of
		Crawford Co. steep creek runs. In fact, its extreme
		combination of gradient and huge undercut boulders packed
		into a super-narrow gorge makes for one of the most
		intense runs anywhere in the Ozarks. First run after a
		freak summer storm on 6/30/99 by Bill Herring and Steve
		Robertson, a little water goes a very long way in this
		small gorge. Minimum, optimal, and high levels are only
		seperated by a few cubic feet per second of flow. And this
		is not a good creek to run when it's too high. The run
		starts at a road crossing where two tributaries merge. The
		first drops are a few easy class III's, which provide
		little warmup for what's comming up. When you pass a
		cascade comming in on the left, you'll be entering
		"Wet Your Whistle", a 1/4 mile long stretch of
		class III-IV that never seems to end. Good eddies are
		really hard to find in this section, and there are some
		places in it that you don't want to explore. Scout ahead
		anytime you can get stopped. When you see a dark, cave
		looking feature up ahead on the right, stop immediately
		and get out on the left bank to scout
		"Cathedral". This is one of the most difficult
		and impressive rapids anywhere in the Ozarks. It consists
		of four successive falls of four to ten feet in height.
		The total drop is nearly 30 feet. Huge undercut rocks
		overhang the rapid from the right, and water sieves into
		and under these rocks in every drop. The third and
		shortest drop is the most intense part, and you have to
		work left fast after it to avoid an undercut and huge
		pothole on the right. Scouting and portaging are possible
		on river left. Next you'll have to get to the right bank
		immediately below the last drop of Cathedral and scout
		downstream to "Quiet Falls". Don't try to run
		down to it from Cathedral, since there is not much
		oppourtunity to stop before you drop over this 18 foot
		fall. The scout or portage is on the right, and it is
		extremely tough. It's a 10 to 15 minute trip one way to
		get around the fall and the grotto that surrounds it.
		Scout the pool carefully before trying to run Quiet Falls,
		as wood tends to collect in the pool below. The pool is
		about 6' at its deepest, and anywhere you land can hit you
		really hard. The drop following the falls is fairly
		straightforward on the right, but on the left it has one
		of the worst undercuts in the Ozarks (nicknamed
		"Wondercut"). If you run it, stay well to the
		right. After this drop, scout ahead all the way to the
		next big drop about 100 yards downstream. This is
		"Big Nasty", which is not runnable by human
		beings at normal levels. This combination
		waterfall/natural bridge/undercut crevice is easiest to
		portage on the left. If you get close to it, you'll likely
		be running it, so pick out a good place to stop if you
		choose to run the class III rapids just above. More class
		III+ leads to a big class IV drop of about 10 feet. This
		rapid tends to collect trees, so a portage on the right
		may be the only good option. About 1/3 mile of
		continuous, cluttered class III-IV water remains before
		the creek eases up to class II-III. Don't let your gaurd
		down in this stretch. After 1/3 mile of easier water,
		you'll turn right and come along side a man-made rock pile
		that has a railroad track on top of it. Get out and walk
		downstream to scout "The Tunnel Of Love". This
		6' culvert can be boated into Clear Cr., which runs on the
		other side of the tracks. The drop into Clear Cr. is about
		6 feet and the hydraulics at the bottom are bizzare and
		could be dangerous. You'll most likely have to roll up
		against the rock wall that the current pushes into right
		at the bottom. Clear Cr. will seem huge after Whistlepost,
		but it's considered a creek run in its own right. Clear
		Cr. has lots of class II-III action and some really bad
		trees right above the bridge at Schaberg. You can take out
		at Schaberg (1/2 mile from Whistlepost) or you can run 5
		more miles to Chester. If you go to Chester, watch out for
		some more big culverts just past the I-540 bridges, and
		beware of a rebar studded low-water crossing near some
		ramshackle houses not too far below the freeway. (This
		author will not run this section of Clear Cr. again, due
		to holes punched into his creek boat by pieces of rebar!)
		Whistlepost is an incredible steep creek run, and it is
		one of the most dangerous runs around. It has more
		undercuts in one mile than any other creek described in
		this list! Scouting the creek dry ahead of time may be
		a requirement for survival. (Besides it's as beautiful to
		hike as it is to run!) If you've been down Hart Cr. and
		thought it was no big deal, you'll probably enjoy
		Whistlepost. If you don't have the skills to handle it,
		you'll have a lot of hiking to do on your way out of the
		gorge.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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White R., West Fork

	Rating: I-II (III)
	TDCR: 2231
	Location: Several put-ins and take-outs are possible.  The river
		follows Hwy. 71 between Winslow and West Fork.  The uppermost 
		put-in is at the ball park in Winslow.  Look for a gas station
		with a gravel parking lot beside it.  Park in the lot where
		the wooden footbridge crosses the small creek.  The next
		public access point is the rest area on Hwy. 71 just north of
		Brentwood.  The next commonly used access is at a green steel
		bridge, right beside a roadside cemetery, a few miles south of 
		West Fork.  The usual lower take-out is at the park just 
		upstream of the Hwy. 170 bridge in West Fork.  Park in the lot 
		on river left just upstream of the dam.		
	Topo Quad(s): Winslow, Brentwood, West Fork
	Gradient: 15 fpm
	Length: 12 mi.
	Season: FALL, SPRING
	Gauge: The White R. at Fayetteville should be 5 feet or higher
		for a run from the green bridge to West Fork.  
		To gauge the river above that point, just inspect the river 
		from the road.  At the wooden bridge in the ballpark at
		Winslow, the rocks under the bridge should be just about
		covered for a good run from that point.
	Hazards: Occasional strainers, undercut at the second ledge
	Description: The West Fork of the White is one of the most
		accessible runs in the state, with a major highway following
		almost the entire run.  It comes up farily often, not 
		needing much rain to be runnable in its lower stretches.
		It offers two class III rapids when it's high and a few nice
		playspots.  But the river is rarely run compared to other
		rivers in the area.  It's hard to guess why this is so,
		but it sure makes for a pleasant trip down the river.
		If the water is high, you can put in as high up as Winslow,
		where the stream has continuous class II rapids and a very
		narrow, twisting course.  A straightforward class III ledge
		is encountered just after putting in, and another class 
		III (IV on the left side?) ledge that pushes into an 
		undercut left bank is encountered a few miles down
		under a red metal footbridge.  Watch out for strainers 
		in this stretch - it's easy to get pushed into downed 
		trees.  The rest stop, about 5 miles from Winslow,
		is a better put-in if the level looks too low for Winslow.
		In the next four miles, the creek picks up a lot of volume
		until it becomes a river.  Pools are longer, and rapids
		in this stretch are generally in the class I and easy
		II range with some tight corners and a few trees to dodge.
		Just before the green bridge, additional water from Winn Cr.
		pumps up the flow even more.  This is a good put-in if the
		water is low.  Between the green bridge and West Fork there 
		are some fairly long pools, but a few ledgy class II drops 
		with some nice surfing opportunites make the trip worthwhile.
		The bluffs on the right just above the dam offer some 
		beautiful scenery as well.  Whatever you do, don't paddle over 
		the low head dam at West Fork!  The hydraulic can kill, even
		at moderate water levels.  Take out upstream of the dam, or
		walk around if you want to continue downstream.  The West Fork
		is suitable for beginning paddlers from the rest stop down,
		and for paddlers who have a good deal of class II-III
		experience from Winslow to the rest stop when the water is
		high.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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White Rock Creek

	Rating: III-IV *
	TDCR: 8797
	Location: To get to the take out drive west on I-40
		turn at the Mulberry exit, go north on Hwy 215. Three miles
		north one encounters the Mill Creek bridge; be sure to stop
		and check the level. Continue north for about five miles
		until Fern at which time 215 curves to the east continue
		east three milestowards Shores Lake. There will be a sign, 
		"Shores Lake Campground" to the right, take it and go one mile
		to the bridge crossing Hurricane Creek. This is the take-out.
		For the put-in be sure to have the Bidville topo and a compass!
		From the take-out follow Bliss Ridge Road north until it
		"T's", take a left and go approxiamately one mile until you
		see an unmaintained road to the left, drive about fifty
		yards down it until you can find a parking place. This road
		also serves as access to a hiking trail. You can either
		follow the hiking trail down to the creek(1.5 mi.)or follow
		the finger ridge down to the creek. It has a gentle slope
		until you are about 100 feet over the creek and adds .5 mi.
		of fun onto the run. If there is any doubt as to the level
		of the creek...take the trail. 
	Topo Quad(s): Bidville
	Gradient: 100 fpm (180 fpm in the first mile)
	Length: 4.5 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Check Mill and Little Mill creeks on the way up 215. They
		should at the very least appear to be runnable. Hurricane
		creek should appear to be flooded.
	Hazards: Several undercuts on White Rock, strainers are present on
		Hurricane but none to speak of on White Rock. As one nears
		the conflence with Hurricane on White Rock there is some
		tornado damage that produces some nasty downed trees and logs.
		Walk around them! This section is noticable as the
		creek appears to be clear-cut on either side, so there is
		plenty of advance notice. These should wash out in the
		coming years.
	Description: White Rock Creek is a low-volume creek that runs off of
		White Rock Mountain - well known by the White Rock Mountain
		Recreation Area that sits on top of a big outcrop of Atoka
		sandstone and affords a view unlike any in the
		area (campsites and hiking trails etc.). Surprisingly the
		first runnable mile only drops 180 feet, however it boasts
		continuous III-IV rapids and falls that require previous
		creeking expirience. There are many falls ranging from 12
		to 6 feet in height and inumerable slides, chutes, boulder
		gardens and the like. White Rock goes about three miles
		through a deep canyon providing views from the creek
		bottom that is some of the most beautiful scenery anywhere
		in the Ozarks. About one half mile down the creek,
		one enters a gorge marked by a two-tiered fall of
		approxiamtely 15 feet.  It is runnable as a broken
		slide on the far right or two vertical drops that are
		separated by an eddy just big enough to hold a couple of
		kayaks. The right and left are preferred routes as there
		is a pile of angular rocks at the center of the base.
		After another quarter mile of countless drops there
		appears an entrance to a slide with a large undercut
		boulder on the right creating a large reaction wave, at
		higher levels it could be dangerous to a swimmer (foot
		entrapment) as the entire creek pushes against the base of
		the rock where there is a slot horizontal to the creekbed
		just wide enough to fit a swimmer's foot or leg. This
		one is nicknamed Pizza Bone Rapid. Numerous rapids
		follow until one comes to a slot (4 to 5 feet wide)
		that is the entrance to a 10 to 12 foot near vertical
		slide that ends in a pool surrounded on all sides by an
		undercut bluff. Micah Adams aptly named it Punchbowl
		Falls. After Punchbowl the creek runs along and under a
		bluffline that creates a tapestry of cascading falls
		running through hanging gardens of ferns and moss for
		about 200 yards; as you paddle back and forth through the
		mild rapids under the drip-line the feeling of isolated
		wilderness is hard to ignore! Numerous rapids follow that
		gradually lessen in intensity, and soon the gorge
		ends. However, this does not mark the end of the fun as
		there are several more six foot drops with a 10 to 12 foot
		falls I like to think of as Skinnydip Falls (because it
		has a nice pool and there is a trail in from the road to
		access it). Not long after this one encounters the confluence
		of Dry Fork and White Rock which is marked by a 5 to 6'
		falls/drop on both drainages, Dry Fork Rapid. It may seem
		to be an end to the whitewater but the paddler should not
		grow complacent as soon one encounters a fall that may
		produce a extremely nasty hydraulic at flood stage. This
		consists of a fall that drops six feet over a sandstone
		slab that is the most uniform falls I have ever seen; so
		much so it appears to be man-made(no straight lines in
		nature). This one is named Shower Curtain Falls because
		one can easily paddle behind the veil and relax while
		viewing the cascading water in a tunnel half sandstone,
		half water. Five of us fit behind it with room to
		spare.† There are more rapids and drops until one nears
		the confluence with Hurricane creek where a tornado
		touched down and produced some nasty log jams, be prepared
		to walk around them. Hurricane will be flooded, so one
		should be very careful when approaching trees and strainers.
		About a mile downstream, Hurricane the creek shoots into
		and under a bluff. To all appearances from upstream it
		doesn't look bad, but when viewing it up close
		you can see an extremely undercut bluff that could be fatal
		if you became trapped under it as the force of the entire
		creek is flowing against it. The take-out is about .75 to
		.5 miles downstream where you'll be glad to see Hurricane
		Creek Bridge!  White Rock Cr. is a good run, but it is very
		isolated and it is certainly no place for those who are
		not sure of their abilities on class IV water.  White Rock
		Cr. was first run on 10/6/98 by Micah Adams, Trey Marley,
		Rob Pollan, Mike Echols and Steve "Dog" Robertson. Thanks
		to Steve Robertson for the write up on this one!

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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South Arkansas and Oklahoma

Baker Cr.

	Rating: II-IV
	TDCR: 5563
	Location: Howard Co.; Put in from Weyerhauser Rd. 52000 heading
		west from 52200 east of the section 2 put-in for the
		Cossatot.  Take out at the Hwy. 4 bridge over Baker Cr.
		just east of the Cossatot bridge.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Baker Springs
	Gradient: 75 fpm
	Length: 3.5 mi
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: The Corps gauge for the Cossatot should be between
		2000 and 4500 cfs.
	Hazards: several large drops in the first mile, some strainers
	Description: Baker is a short but exciting advanced whitewater run.
		It drops very steeply in the first mile, and the worst
		drop is encountered in the first bend of the creek.  This is
		a solid class IV ledge of over ten feet, and at high water
		an ugly hydraulic forms at the base of the ledge.  Scout 
		and/or run it on the left.  After some good class III water,
		you get another horizon line.  This is another big, tough
		ledge that is only slightly easier than the first one.
		After the first 3/4 mile or so the creek settles into
		some good class II-III action until the takeout.  All boaters
		should be confident on fast class III-IV water before running
		Baker Cr.  If you get nervous at Cossatot Falls then this
		run will probably be over your head.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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North Fork Of Blakely Cr.

	Rating: II
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Hot Springs County. Take exit 91 (Social Hill) off I-30 and
		head east on Hwy 84 about 3 miles then turn left on county
		road 13 (830 in the Delorme Atlas) just before the store on
		the left. After the road turns to dirt it's about 1/4 mile
		turn left 50 yds. to the takeout; to get to the put-in go
		back to CR 13 and turn left when the main road turns right
		stay straight until the road makes a sharp left and you're
		there.
	Topo Quad(s): N/A
	Gradient: N/A
	Length: 1.5 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: There should be at least 6 inches of water over the low
		water bridge at the put-in for the creek to be runnable.
		You will cross over the main fork of Blakely Creek between
		the exit and the turn on the county road if it's not high
		and muddy the water's probably too low.
	Hazards:  Downed trees 
	Description: The first 3/8 of a mile has numerous 1-3 feet drops
		separated by short pools with fast current and some waves.
		One rapid about 1/4 of a mile from the put-in is a double
		drop and the clear path on the first drop doesn't line up
		with the second drop path quick maneuvering is required.
		After you go through Car Cruncher (there's a crunched car
		on the right bank) beware of downed trees. Then after you
		go through a channel in the willows barely wide enough for
		a kayak the rapids lose intensity and the pools get longer
		until right before the takeout where there's a 2 foot drop
		followed by 50 yds. of waves. The creek is never very far
		from the road and it could be floated into the Main Fork
		of Blakely Creek and use Hwy 84 as a takeout.  Don't expect
		a large volume of water on this swift narrow stream
		unless you float into the main fork.  Thanks to 
		parkerja@hsnp.com for info on this creek.

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Camp Cr.

	Rating: IV+ *
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Take Hwy. 70 west from Hot Springs, then take Hwy. 4
		north just before you get to Dierks.  Go about 7 miles
		until you reach the Blue Ridge Campgound access.  Go past
		this point and take the first dirt road on the left.
		Go about one mile until you see a tin barn on the right.
		Directy accross from this barn is a small road that
		leads to a camping spot.  Camp Creek Falls is only
		30 feet from the campping area.  Other put-ins and
		take-outs may be possible.
	Topo Quad(s): N/A
	Gradient: N/A fpm
	Length: N/A mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Visual gauge at the Falls.  If the Little Missouri R. 
		gauge at Langley is very high, that may be a good 
		indication as well.		
	Hazards:  Vertical pins at the falls if you dont boof.
	Description: This description only covers Camp Creek Falls, a 
		12 to 13 foot plunge on the creek.  There may be other
		rapids worth running, but, so far, scouting the
		creek near the Falls hasn't turned up much. The 
		Falls has two possible lines, both of which have "S" 
		turns at the top.  Both also land on a foam pile
		with a grabby hole at the bottom.  The Falls were first 
		run on Nov. 6, 2000 on river right by Jason Mellor, 
		John McCoy, and Heath Day.  Jason also ran the river 
		left line that day, which is a bit more difficult.
		The Falls is about 20 minutes from the Cossatot
		and Little Missouri, and is worth checking out
		if you're in the area after a big rain!

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Cossatot R.

	Rating: II-IV
	TDCR: 5544
	Location:  Polk and Howard Co.;
		S1: Put in at the Hwy. 246 bridge east of Hwy 71.  Take out
			is reached by taking Weyerhauser Rd. 52200 south
			from Hwy. 246 just east of the put-in.  Then take
			52000 west to reach the river.
		S2: Take out at Ed Banks bridge on Weyerhauser Rd 52600 
			which runs north from Hwy. 278 (used to be Hwy. 4)
			and connects with 52200 coming south from Hwy. 246.
		S3: Take out at the low water bridge downstream from the
			Hwy. 278 bridge.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Eagle Mountain, Baker Springs
	Gradient: 15 to 25 fpm  (the Falls area is a major exception)
	Length: S1: 3 mi
		S2: 1.5 mi
		S3: 4.5 mi
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: The minimum level on the USGS gauge at Vandervoort is 
		around 3.2 feet.  The Falls can be run down to 3.0 or so, but 
		the rest of the river starts getting really bony below 3.5.  The 
		river is much pushier and the Falls starts to go into the solid 
		class IV+ range somewhere above 5.0 feet.  The river has been run
		by crazed adrenaline junkies up to over 10 feet, but the Falls
		is very scary for even the best of boaters at anything over 7 feet!
		LINK TO USGS GAUGE
	Hazards: Big, continuous drops in the Falls area, and very heavy water
		in S2 and S3 when levels are high.
	Description: The Cossatot is probably the premier whitewater run in 
		Arkansas.  S1 consists of mostly class II rapids and is 
		suitable for boaters with a little experience on whitewater.
		However, if you don't have much experience, don't venture
		below S1!  The action picks up considerably in S2 with rapids
		like ZigZag and The Esses.  ZigZag is an easy class III
		drop, and enders are possible in the hole below if the water 
		is high.  The Esses is a long, complex class III rapid, and 
		the penalty for a mistake in this rapid could be a long and 
		bruising swim!  To avoid the big stuff, you can start center-left
		and work your way to the right toward several eddies along the
		right bank.  There are a couple of solid holes in the middle of
		the run to pick your way past.  A few more good rapids are 
		encountered before you come to the Sandbar bridge where
		the final section of the river begins.  Portage the bridge on
		the left - don't get near the middle of the bridge as it is
		extremely hazardous.  Only a few hundred yards below the Sandbar
		bridge, the Cossatot Falls section begins.  This is a series of 
		back-to-back class III-IV rapids that drops around 40 feet in 1/8 
		of a mile.  The first of these is a big class II+ drop followed by
		a pool at most levels.  The next drop, Eye Opener, presents the
		paddler with a horizon line.  At lower levels, the hole below this
		three foot ledge is not too bad, but at levels of over 5.0 feet,
		it can be a keeper!  Scout if there is any doubt.  Below this 
		the river is pushed to the left into B.M.F. a tricky class 
		III drop.  This one is generally run angling to the left and
		dodging the hidden rock in the middle.  Be sure to catch an
		eddy below B.M.F. because the Washing Machine is just below.
		The Machine is a class IV drop at almost any level.  At levels
		below 4.5 feet, it must be approached from the right side.
		Running almost perpendicular to the streambed, enter the drop,
		turn right and hit the middle of the slot to finish.  It's
		easy to make the turn too tight and end up on the right
		where the Cannonball Rock lurks at low water levels and 
		where the Washing Machine Hole will take you to the cleaners
		at medium flows.  At high water, you can approach from the
		center or even the left and run straight over the top of
		the drop.  If you have trouble in the Machine, your troubles
		will be compounded by Whiplash, a long class III+ drop right
		below the Machine.  At high water levels, it's a great idea
		to set some rope support on the left bank at strategic
		locations between B.M.F. and Whiplash, since an unassisted
		swimmer will get flushed through all of these - a bruising
		ride.  Needless to say, having a reliable roll is also an
		excellent idea.  The Falls ends with Shoulderbone, a class II 
		drop with a pretty good play hole at lower levels.  At certain 
		flows even bigger boats can get enders in the hole here.  
		Several good rapids are encountered below the Falls, but if 
		you had a clean run in the Falls only two will give you any 
		trouble.  The first is Deer Camp Rapids, an easy looking 
		class III that can pin unwary boaters.  The other is Devil's 
		Hollow Falls.  This ugly sheer fall has a nasty landing on 
		jagged rocks that have taken skin off of more than a few 
		boaters.  Pins and entrapments are a real danger in this 
		rapid, and some close calls have happened here.  Don't run
		the ledge unless you know exactly what you're doing.
		You can walk or sneak around Devil's Hollow Falls on the 
		far left.  At lower levels, it's a long, relatively flat,
		paddle to the takeout from Devil's Hollow.  If the river
		is below 3.5 feet, many boater will run Cossatot Falls
		and then carry back up the bank rather than continuing
		down to the Hwy. 278 bridge.  It's about an equal effort
		either way though - the trek back up the Falls is not for
		the meek!  The Cossatot is a great whitewater river, but
		be sure you're up to the challenge before you try to boat
		down the Falls.  A lot of folks, including this author, have
		been beaten up by this infamous stretch of river.  Only boaters
		with solid self rescue skills and experience on pushy class
		IV water should attempt the Falls.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Crooked Cr.

	Rating: III-IV (V)
	TDCR: 7771
	Location: Go about 2 miles north of Albert Pike on CR4 until 
		you come to CR1.  Take CR1 about anther 2 miles until 
		the creek goes under the road.  This is the takeout.  
		There are campsites there that you can use to park. 
		Continue up CR1 until you get to the Little Missouri
		Falls turn off - this is the putin for the lower gorge. 
		To get to the put in for the upper gorge keep following 
		CR1 until you come to a low water bridge that is not crossable, 
		park here and ferry across the creek.  Carry your boat .5 
		to .75 miles up the road to the next low water bridge. Put in 
		at that point for the upper gorge.  The creek runs right by 
		the road the entire time so scouting on the way up is possible. 
		At the time of this writing in Spring of 2001, the section 
		of the creek between the Backbreaker Falls and the lower gorge
		is completely full of downed trees from a massive ice storm.
		You will probably just want to skip this whole section
		and shuttle back down from the big falls to the put-in for
		the lower section.
	Topo Quad(s): N/A
	Gradient: 115 fpm (275 fpm max)
	Length: 3 mi
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Little Missouri at Langley should be at least 7.5 for the 
		lower section and 9.5 for the upper gorge.  The only way to be 
		sure is visual inspection of the creek.
	Hazards: Large falls, undercuts, strainers, continuous rapids, etc.
	Description: The first run of Crooked Cr. was by Chris Anderson 
		in January 1995, when all but a couple of drops were run.  Chris 
		returned in January of 1997 and ran all of the drops at that
		time.  The upper gorge consists of 5 or 6 waterfalls ranging 
		5 to 10 feet in height.  These falls all occur in less than 100 
		yards.  After this the creek makes a left turn followed by 
		several slide/ledge drops before it slows down a little 
		before the low water bridge.  Thanks to the ice storm the 
		upper gorge is not runnable at the time of this writing.
		Just below the low water bridge is Back Breaker Falls, a
		class IV+ to V drop.  Trees tend to accumulate near or in the
		drop, so watch out for them.  The only good line on this 
		drop is the far right.  If you get into the middle of the
		falls, you will hit a launching pad that can send you flying
		onto an extremely shallow shelf 18 to 20 feet below!  If you 
		stay on the right side line, you can run down on a seam just 
		big enough to put a boat down.  It's a great ride if you make
		the line - a real banger if you don't.  As of June 2001, you'll
		need to portage (shuttle) from the pool below the falls to
		the start of the lower section near Little Missouri Falls.
		Eventually the dozens of downed trees in this section will
		not be a problem, but it will take several years for that to
		happen.  The lower section starts of with some class II+
		rapids, and then a definite horizon line appears.  This is 
		the start of Double Ledges - a solid class III rapid.  Start 
		on the far left and run the slot working your way right into 
		a seam about half way down.  The next bridge you go under marks
		the start of the lower gorge.  All of the water pushes to the
		right, but head for the eddy on the left to scout the drops.
		There are several different lines through this tight, class IV 
		section of whitewater, but only one way out at the bottom.  
		Pick the line that suits you best, but be on target when you
		reach the final drops.  At the bottom of the gorge there 
		is a 6 to 8 foot waterfall with a boofing pad just right 
		of center.  Make sure you hit the boof because the pool is 
		shallow!  Several bows have been smashed here due to wayward
		lines.  A few more class II rapids brings you to another 
		bridge - the entrance to the last rapid.  This solid 
		class III drop provides several broaching and pinning
		possibilities.  Take out at the bottom of this rapid
		and head to the Little Missuori for some big water 
		play boating!  This little creek is certainly one of the
		most beautiful and exciting runs in the state.  Scout 
		it carefully from the road and make sure you are up to
		the challenge before tackling the drops.  Thanks to Heath
		Day and Lance Jones for information on this great run.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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DeRoach Cr.

	Rating: II-III *
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Put-in: Highwy 283 bridge. Plenty of parking just before
		bridge on the right coming from Arkadelphia. Take-out:
		Highway 67 bridge, either side. There's a nice place to
		park at the bridge. There are cows and a nice fence on the
		right and a little incline on the left. Take your pick. It
		seems to be friendly teritory, but you never know these
		days.
	Topo Quad(s): Caddo Valley
	Gradient: 20 fpm (65 fpm max)
	Length: 6 mi
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: Guage on Hwy 283 bridge. Any thing above 3 feet is runnable.
		Up to 6 or 7 becomes a much tougher run. Above that the run is
		severely flooded.
	Hazards:† Trees and strainers. An ugly triple set of culverts that
		proceed through a low water bridge are usually clogged with debris
		Also at the take out watch for slick cow patties. :-)
	Description: The run starts out with about 3.4 miles of moving flat
		water. The good stuff starts at A**-hole Culverts, which should
		be portaged. There are a number of good surf waves just
		downstream of the culverts but the meat of the run begins as
		you notice the walls of the ridge rising. Rock House Rapid is
		a nice III rapid, sometimes presenting difficulty when
		trees or debree collect in the boulders. The rapid can also
		be run right from the very top where the rocks are split by
		an island. A few hundred yards downstream is a nice
		continuous field of waves and holes called "Fitz-Cha
		Rapids". You might want to stay river right the first time
		you run this one, because half way down there's a BIG hole
		left of center. (Note: The hole very deceptive from up top
		and based on personal experience, it will hold you untill
		the water level drops. You will then be nearing I-30, and
		Meatface Rapids, which is the best section of class III
		rapids, depending on the level.  This section is about
		several hundred yards of continuous drops, holes, and waves.
		If you can find a path back up to the top, I recomend running
		this section twice. Just below the interstate is the last
		good rapid which can be run straight on. This one ends
		with a nice surf wave, once again depending on the level.
		Be warned that this is a narrow, fast paced creek run
		full of numerous strainers and other hazards.  Because it
		is so tight, there is a lot of difference between 3 ft 
		on the gauge and 6 ft.  Anyone who can't hit an eddy on a
		dime has no business being on the creek when the water's
		good, despite what you might hear from paddlers who have run
		it at low levels.  Thanks to Rob Fisher and Lance Jones
		for information on this run.

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Gutter Rock Cr.

	Rating: III+ *
	TDCR: ????
	Location:  Logan Co.; Take Hwy 23 south of I-40 at Mulberry the
		take Hwy 309 to Paris.  From there, all I can remember is
		that it's below the north face of Mt. Magazine on a road
		labeled 1631C on the topo quads.  Find the Cove Cr.
		confluence and put in on the road 2 mi. above that.
		Take out on another dirt road 1 mile below Cove Cr. on
		Short Mtn. Cr.  Shuttle is on the river left side of the creek.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Blue Mountain, Paris
	Gradient: 100 fpm.
	Length: 3 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Only runnable after extremely heavy rainfall.  You may be 
		able to estimate when Gutter Rock is up by checking the flows
		on Dutch Cr. and Pettit Jean at Booneville.  When Dutch Cr.
		is running 1000 cfs (7.0 ft) or more and Pettit Jean is running
		several thousand cfs (12+ ft), Gutter Rock and Shoal Cr. are
		probably runnable (that day at least!).  Also, check the rainfall
		gauge at Blue Mtn. Dam.  Over 1.5 inches of recent rain is a good
		indicator.  You can find these gauges on the ACC Bulletin 
		Board.
	Hazards: heavy strainers, continuous rapids
	Description: This creek was first run by Tom Lewis, Cowper Chadbourn,
		C. Chevalier, Jim McDaniel, Chris Anderson, Nathan Kline 
		and Paul Caldwell in Dec. 1993.  It is very tight and fast 
		paced, and contains numerous class III+ rapids.  The 
		gradient is spread out very evenly over the 3 mile run.  
		Some of the tougher drops are encountered in a small gorge just
		above the confluence with Cove Cr.  After this confluence you 
		are on Short Mtn. Cr. which may be boated past the above 
		mentioned take out.  This creek has been described as 
		comparable to Shoal Cr.  I've just seen it dry, so thanks
		to Tom Lewis and Cowper Chadbourn for the info. on this one.  
		Gutter Rock should only be attempted by advanced boaters,
		due to the heavy whitewater and the remoteness of the run.

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Jack Cr.

	Rating: II-III
	TDCR: 4442
	Location: To reach the take-out, take Hwy 23 south from Booneville
		aprrox 1.5 miles and turn left on Jack Cr. Rd. going toward
		Grayson and Jack Cr. Recreation Area. The road will eventually
		turn to gravel. At the next four way intersection, turn
		left (East) onto a paved road.  Follow this road downhill to
		Jack Cr. Rec. Area and the bridge over Sugar Cr.  Jack Cr.
		Campgorund is the take-out. To reach the put-in, go over
		the bridge over Sugar Cr. and follow this road to the next
		bridge which crosses Jack Cr. You can either put in at this
		bridge or take one of the small dirt roads to the left
		(West) which will take you up to Ramsey or Pigeon Cr. and
		add a few miles of class II+ water to the run if the water
		is high. The creek is only one hour from Fort Smith and
		Russellville, so it's a great afternoon run for paddlers in
		these areas.
	Topo Quad(s): Sugar Grove, Freedom Mountain
	Gradient: 65 fpm
	Length: 3 mi
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: One possible way to gauge Jack Cr. is to look at the USGS
		Petit Jean R. gauge at Booneville. If this gauge is reading over
		10 feet there should be enough water for a good run, unless
		rain was spotty. Also look at Dutch Creek at Waltreak.  A
		reading of 6.0 or better can be a good indication of water
		on Jack and Sugar Cr.  Typically Jack Cr. takes a bit more 
		rain than Sugar Cr., and about 1.5"+ in the area is a good 
		indication that it will be comming up.  When you get to Sugar Cr.,
		water comming over the low water bridge at Knoppers Ford
		usually means you'll have enough for a run on Jack Cr.
	Hazards: Willow strainers, downed trees, and hydraulics at high
		levels
	Description: Jack Cr. is a great little creek run in the Ouachita
		Mountains. The scenery along the creek is superb! The creek
		races between intricately layered and folded bluffs as it
		appraches its confluence with Sugar Cr., creating
		fast-paced class II and III rapids and taking the paddler
		through some of the most interesting scenery in the state.
		Surfing oppourtunities abound, with several nice waves and
		holes to catch on the way down. Watch out for willow
		strainers in a few places that can pin paddlers who
		misjudge the fast currents flowing through them.  However,
		the trees aren't usually as bad as those on Sugar Cr.,
		so if the creeks are high, Jack is a much better choice.
		At high levels, also watch out for a couple of chutes
		into really big hydraulics!  If you want to extend your 
		run, you can follow the small roads upstream from the 
		put-in bridge that lead to Ramsey Cr. or Pigeon Cr. 
		Pigeon Cr. is extremely small, and Jack Cr. must be 
		very high before Pigeon Cr. will be running. The rapids 
		in these two creeks are not really any more challenging 
		than Jack Cr., but the stream beds are narrow (especially 
		Pigeon Cr.!) and the gradient is steeper.  If Jack Cr. is 
		too bony, try Sugar Cr. upstream of the Jack Cr. 
		confluence, a good class II+ to III run when Jack Cr. is
		too low to boat. 

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Jimmy Cr.

	Rating: III-IV *
	TDCR: 5472
	Location:  Jimmy Cr. is located in Comanche Co., OK in the Wichita
		Mts.  Take Hwy. 58 until there is a sign that says "Meers
		4 miles".  At the sign take a left.  Set your car to take out
		at Lake Lawtonka. Firther up the road, you will pass 
		over the creek just before Meers Cafe.  At the next stop 
		sign take a right.  About fifty yards up the road is 
		the put-in. Jimmy Cr. confluences with Medicine Cr. after 
		about 1.25 mi, then it is about two miles to the take out 
		at Lake Lawtonka.
	Topo Quad(s): Pg. 50 of OK Gazeteer Qd. E-3
	Gradient: 100 fpm
	Length: 3 mi
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Optimal is about 4" of water over the put-in bridge, but the creek
		can be run with even less water.  Quite a bit of rain is needed
		to bring this creek up.
	Hazards: There are a few hazards to keep an eye out for.  Strainers 
		are thick on this creek, so watch for them.  The bridge 
		before Meers had two of three channels blocked with debris
		on the first run.  Narrow channels and technical moves are 
		the mainstay of this run, and vertical pins are a possibility 
		at Chocolate Thunder. 
	Description: Jimmy Cr. was first run on Oct. 23, 2000 by Dave Borrel
		and Terry DeMoe. The run is best described as a very fun
		and continuous creek run with class III-IV rapids. The 
		first rapid comes about thirty yards into the run. Sugar 
		Mama (III) drops three feet with a glassy wave below it. 
		The next rapid is Snicker Doodle (II+) featuring three 
		and four foot waves, cutting to the right. Then comes the 
		bridge, so eddy out on river left and make sure the channel 
		is clear before running or consider a portage. Immediatly 
		after the bridge is Porcupine (III+). This rapid runs through
		trees, and there are several precise cuts you must make in
		to complete the drop. Choclate Thunder (III+) is a five 
		ft. drop with a narrow slot to hit. In the center of the creek,
		the first descent paddlers both hit a rock at the bottom of the
		drop.  A good boof may be needed to keep your bow up as you go
		over the top.  Little Thunder (III) is a three foot drop 
		followed by a wave train.  After this the river cuts to the 
		right again. Eddy out left to scout the next rapid, 
		Twisted Cedar (IV).  This is a double drop with a right 
		entrance.  Stay right and be ready for a left draw as you 
		hit the second drop. The last rapid is Twisted Sister (III+) 
		a four ft. drop on the right. There are several vines hanging 
		into the water here and the current pushes into them, so be 
		careful.  About fifty yards later Jimmy Cr. runs into
		Medicine Cr. (II-III).  There is much more flat water on
		Medicine, but towards the end there are three good class
		III rapids (Apache, Comanche, and Geronimo). Although
		Jimmy is only a mile and a quarter run, it is packed with
		great rapids.  It is well worth checking out, but make sure
		you're experienced with tight class III+ rapids before you
		make the trip.

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Little Missouri R.

	Rating: II-III
	TDCR: 4445
	Location:  Polk, Montgomery, and Pike Co.; Put in is at Albert Pike
		Campground reached by taking Hwy. 369 north from Hwy. 84
		at Langley.  The take out is at the Hwy. 84 bridge west
		of Langley.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Big Fork, Polk Cr. Mountain, Athens
	Gradient: 35 fpm (?)
	Length: 8.5 mi
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: A minimum of 27 inches of airspace is needed at the Albert
		Pike low-water bridge.  When water is lapping against the
		bottom of this bridge, the run will be severely flooded and
		solid class III-IV.
	Hazards: Willow strainers, hydraulics at high levels
	Description: This pristine stream is one of the prettiest in the
		Ouachitas.  The run contains some class III rapids at any
		level, and some of the biggies may be pushing class IV
		when the water is high.  The Winding Stairs (III) is a series
		of four good drops in quick succession, and Edgar's Ledge
		(III) can flex it's muscles at medium to high water.  Take
		time to drive a few miles north of Albert Pike to the Little
		Missouri Falls area.  These drops are almost always
		too shallow to run, but the last one may be runnable if the
		water is extremely high.  All boaters should be competent on
		class III water if the level is low, and only solid class IV
		boaters should tackle the run at higher flows.  If you
		don't fall into either one of these categories, you can put
		in at the Hwy. 84 bridge and float through some good class II
		water for 11 miles down to the bridge at U.S. 70.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Ouachita River At Rockport

	Rating: II
	TDCR: ????
	Location: You can float the river by launching just below Remmel Dam,
		take US Hwy 270 east from Malvern to Jones Mill. Turn left
		onto Remmel Dam road and follow to the river. Or you can
		drive to the I-30 Bridge crossing and paddle 1/4 mile
		upstream to the ledge. Recently the road on the north side
		has been opened and it may be possible to drive directly to
		the ledge. To park under the I-30 Bridge cross the river on
		I-30 going west and exit immediately, cross over and turn
		left at the old Tanner Street Bridge to cross private
		property to the I-30 Bridge access.
	Topo Quad(s): Malvern North
	Gradient: N/A (just one rapid)
	Length: N/A (5 mi. from dam to I-30)
	Season: ALL
	Gauge: USGS Ouachita River Gage at Jones Mill, river is typically
		up or down. Optimum surfing at the ledge is 3,600 cfs which
		is full flow generation from the dam.
	Hazards:  No major hazards beyond the typical underwater rocks and
		swift water. There is excellent recovery if you should swim
		while playing. 
	Description: There is a river wide ledge that creates a number of Class
		II play spots. This is a good location for beginners to
		learn to ferry and roll and for more advanced paddlers to
		play when nothing else is running. During the week you can
		call Entergy at 501-844-2148 and ask if Remmel Dam is
		generating. Note that it requires 3 hours for the water to
		fully develop at the ledge after generation starts. During
		the late summer the dam may only run for 3 hours. The dam
		typically operates during the peak energy load demand
		which is late afternoon in the summer so this makes an
		ideal after work opportunity for those in the Little Rock
		and Hot Springs areas.  Thanks to Ted Smethers for information
		on this great summertime playspot.

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Saline R.

	Rating: II-III *
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Howard Co.; Put in below Shady Lake on Hwy. 84 west
		of Athens.  Take out at Hwy. 246 bridge north of Athens.
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Umpire
	Gradient: 50 fpm
	Length: 3 mi
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Water should be running over Shady Lake Dam near the put-in.
		Also, other runs nearby should be in flood.
	Hazards: strainers and very fast current
	Description: This is a fast, continuous class II+ run with some
		class III+ hazards created by downed trees.  All boaters
		need to have very good boat control, since catching an
		eddy in the fast current could mean the difference between
		a good run and a very bad one.  Otherwise, the run is fast
		and fun with continuous gradient.  Boaters should be very 
		comfortable on class II-III water and very familiar with
		the dangers of strainers before attempting this run. 

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Lower Saline R.

	Rating: II+ (play waves)
	TDCR: ????
	Location: Below Dierks Lake at USCOE Campground. Follow the signs to
		Dierks Lake Dam from Hwy 70 just West of the town of
		Dierks. Play the 3/4 mile horseshoe bend around the
		campground. This area contains the best play spots.
	Topo Quad(s): N/A
	Gradient: ?? fpm
	Length: 3/4 mi
	Season: DAM CONTROLLED - usually releases occur during drawdown in early fall
	Gauge: The USGS gauge on the Saline R. near Dierks. The new features seem to be playable
		from 6 ft up to maximum flow from the spillway (somewhere
		around 10 or 11 ft). This gauge is several miles downstream
		from the features and it seem to take 4-5 hours for the
		water to travel that far and for the gauge to show a
		release.
		Click here for the Corp gauge for the lake. Notice
		the min pool level. If below this, the river won't run.
		Click here for the gauge at the spillway/pipe. This
		updates every four hours or so. It is a faster indicator than the
		USGS guage, which is 5 miles down stream.
	Hazards: N/A
	Description: This is a really nice area that is perfect for
		park and play. There is a wooded campground with 8-10
		sites with blacktop roads, level, gravel parking pads, a
		restroom with flush toilets and a pavilion. The loop is
		about 3/4 of a mile long and shuttle can be walked (about
		a 1/4 mile). There are a couple of natural class I-II
		rapids in the loop besides the 3 features that were built
		with the COE in July, 2004. These features are at the
		bottom of the loop, just down from the campground. The
		first one is a small, glassy wave (about 1.5ft tall) with
		a good eddy on the right. The second feature is an
		aggressive hole that is more surfable on river right, and
		more trashy on river left. Eddies on both sides, with the
		eddie on the right being a little more user friendly.
		Several people have swum out of this hole, but all with
		smiles on their faces and with little to no recirculation
		once the boater and the boat separate. The third feature
		is a large frothy wave/hole (about 4 ft tall) with nice
		eddies on both sides. This hole has a clean washout and is
		not as nasty as it first appears. The size intimidates
		newer paddlers but can be fun for everyone. Any trick you 
		want to throw can be attempted here.  Just below at the 
		takeout by the swimming area is the last rapid. A class 
		II with a couple of small surfing spots.  Eddy service is 
		not as good for these.  Currently there is only one scheduled 
		release that happens the first or second weekend in October. 
		The rest of the time it will only run several days after a 
		good rain. This is a flood control lake and they actually 
		hold water back to help out down stream and release
		several days later when things downstream drop down. 

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Shoal Cr.

	Rating: III *
	TDCR: ????
	Location:  Logan Co.; Take Hwy 109 south from Clarksville to New
		Blaine then take NFR 1603 south and then NFR 1600 south
		(right) and then NFR 1601 west (right again) to the bridge
		over Shoal Cr.  Put in at this bridge.  Take out at
		low water bridge on NFR 1614 south of Midway (west of
		New Blaine on Hwy 22).
		Area Map
	Topo Quad(s): Magazine Mountain NE, Scranton
	Gradient: 75 fpm
	Length: 7 mi.
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Water should be flowing over the low water bridge at the
		take out.  Only boatable after heavy rains.
	Hazards: strainers and tight technical rapids
	Description: Shoal Cr. is a fast, tight run with many good class
		III and even IV rapids.  Watch out for willows near the
		end of the run.  You should be a confident class III boater
		to attempt Shoal Cr.

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South Fourche La Fave R.

	Rating: II+
	TDCR: 2234
	Location: The uppermost put-in is the USFS campground at Hollis on Hwy. 7.
		The bottom take-out is near Aplin at the Deberrie low water
		bridge.  To get to the take-out from the west, drive towards 
		Aplin on Hwy. 60.  Just before Aplin, Hwy. 155 runs south and 
		crosses the Fouche.  There is a dirt road that veers off to
		the right immediately after the bridge and follows the Fourche.
		Follow this road and keep bearing right and you will get
		to the take out bridge.  Itís near the Deberrie cemetary, and
		it's a fairly big concrete low-water bridge with several culverts 
		in the middle. If the middle culverts are 1/2 to 2/3 full, youíll 
		have good water. If the river is over the bridge, itís probably too
		high for safe paddling. To get to the put-in at Hollis, get back on
		Hwy. 60 and head east to Fourche Junction.  Take Hwy. 7 south 
		toward Hot Springs and put-in at the USFS campground just south 
		of the bridge at Hollis.
	Topo Quad(s): Nimrod
	Gradient: ???
	Length: 11 mi.
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: The USGS Hollis gauge should be at 3.5 for a runnable level. 
		4-5 ft is optimal, and 6 ft and up may be dangerous due to 
		log jams and meanders. Put in at Cedar Creek lake dam when 
		the creek is higher to avoid the log jams. 
	Hazards:  Log jams and pushy water when high.  Also the low water
		bridge at the take out has culverts that must be avoided. 
	Description: The first part of the river is pretty tame.  The S.
		Fourche tends to be pretty brown from runnoff due to farms
		above Hollis, but the scenery is good.  As the river just 
		bumps along, you can look around and see Forked Mountain 
		in the distance. After about a third of the way through the
		trip, the river braids and breaks into several branches 
		through a tangle of trees and flotsam.  This spot is about a half
		mile past a cabin on river left.  The first river left branch
		appears to be the best as thereís only one nasty, gown-up 
		area you have to pick a line through. Keep to the left as 
		you work through the first part and then right at the bottom. 
		You want to be pretty careful through this mess to avoid pinning
		on a tree. Eventually, the river runs back into one channel,
		runs into a large hillside as it turns left and Cedar Cr.
		comes in from river right. Cedar Cr. makes a good alternate
		put-in at high water levels (put-in at Cedar Cr. Lake below the
		dam by taking FR 86 off of Hwy. 7 just south of Hollis, then 
		go north on FR 29150 through a clear cut until you get to
		an intersection, and follow the small road that runs northeast and
		uphill to the dam). About 200 yards downstream from Cedar Cr. is 
		the first significant rapid (class II+), called "Blockhead" 
		because it features a large blocky boulder on river right that
		much of the water funnels into. Above the rock and in the
		middle of the flow is another smaller rock that must be
		missed. When water is flowing over the rock, it makes for a 
		nice "boof" move. Below this rapid, you can play in the jet and 
		eddylines caused by Blockhead Rock. A half mile below Blockhead, 
		another rapid appears as you approach a rocky hogback ridge
		that cuts into the river from the left. This rapid has no
		real obstacles but is fun, fast water. This is a spot to
		appreciate how unique the scenery on the S. Fourche is.
		It looks like no other river in Arkansas, as it cuts through 
		the rocky and sparesely vegetated east/west Ouachita ridges. If 
		you paddle the river in winter, the barren slopes are reminicient
		of the desert runs in the West.  The midpoint of the trip comes
		at one of the few roads that crosses the river, FR 210.
		There's no bridge, but you can see an old concrete tower on river 
		left: the USGS Hollis gaging station. There's a big willow jungle
		right below the road, with the best line at middle-right. A few
		hundred yards below the jungle is a large, bald ridge on river
		right that is very scenic. The action picks up again as Cove Cr.
		approaches. Thereís a nice rapid, known as "Bounce Rapid" just above 
		Cove Cr. with several eddies and then a small drop at the end.
		Soon after the entry of Cove creek the river runs into another 
		ridge and sharply turns to the east. After this point, the S. 
		Fourche slows and become a pastoral stream. There are a few more 
		rapids but not any that really demand attention. Soon, the
		river cuts back to the north between a ridge and empties into the
		Fourche Valley. Thereís a great surfing rapid about 3/4
		mile before the take out. Itís created by a ledge thatís
		pretty sharp on river left but smoothes out on river
		right. It creates a nice side surfing hole on left thatís
		easy to get into and a lot of fun to play. The S. Fourche is
		often overlooked by paddlers, but it is one of the more scenic 
		and interesting streams in the state. It has a true wilderness
		feel and the unusual scenery makes up for a somewhat murky water
		quality. If youíre looking for continuous whitewater, this river
		isnít for you, but it's a fine run for those wanting to explore 
		a new class II+ river. Thanks to T. Yamashita for information on 
		this great run!

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Sugar Cr.

	Rating: III
	TDCR: 5543
	Location: To reach the take-out, take Hwy 23 south from Booneville
		aprrox 1.5 miles and turn left on Jack Cr. Rd. going toward
		Grayson and Jack Cr. Campground.  Follow the signs for Jack
		Creek Recreation Area.  The road will eventually turn to 
		gravel and then you'll come to a four-way intersection.  Turn
		left (East) onto a paved road.  Follow this road downhill to
		Jack Cr. Rec. Area and the bridge over Sugar Cr. The recreation
		area is the takeout.  To reach the put-in, go back the way you
		came, uphill, to the four-way intersection and hang a left
		(South).  After you go back downhill to the creek, you'll
		come to the low water bridge at Knoppers Ford Campground.
		If water is over this bridge, CHECK IT CAREFULLY before
		attempting to cross it!  If you can't cross here, the creek
		is flooded - turn around and run Jack Cr. instead!  Otherwise
		cross this low water bridge and keep driving to the next low
		water bridge.  Stop here and make sure you mark this dangerous
		bridge so that you can eddy out well above it.  A 10 minute
		hike up the bank to mark an eddy can save your life!  Then
		cross the bridge and drive until you reach the third low
		water bridge.  This is the ususal put in point.  The creek
		can be boated above this point in high water, but there's
		plenty of action for most folks below this bridge!
	Topo Quad(s): Sugar Grove, Freedom Mountain
	Gradient: 45 fpm (first 2 miles @ 65 fpm)
	Length: 6 mi
	Season: RAIN
	Gauge: The USGS gauge for the Petit Jean R. at Booneville should
		generally be reading over 9 feet for a good run.  Dutch Creek 
		at Waltreak may be an even better indicator: a reading of 
		5.0 or better usually means there is water in Sugar Cr.
		If both of these gauges are looking good, it's a done deal!
		There is a hand painted gauge on one of the concrete bridge 
		supports on the downstream side of the Sugar Cr. bridge at
		the take-out near Jack Cr. Rec. Area.  1 foot on this gauge is
		a good minimum for Sugar Cr.  1.5 is starting to cook and there
		will be some fast class III action.  2.0 is a solid class III
		level and quite pushy (also the upstream bridges have some water
		over them at this level).  If you can't see any marks at all,
		the creek will be in flood - rapids will be long, constant
		class III to IV with little hope of dodging the trees or
		finding eddies.  Insane hairboaters may have fun at this level,
		but most folks will want to check out Jack Cr. which will
		also be pumped way up to class III+ levels.
	Hazards: An incredible amount of trees!  Also the most dangerous
		low water bridge in Arkansas (2.5 miles from the put-in)
		and several cables hanging into the creek about 1/4 mile 
		above Knoppers Ford!  Did I mention the trees?  Also some 
		nasty hydraulics at high water levels. And trees.
	Description: Maybe the best way to describe the character
		of the Sugar Cr. run is Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.  At lower
		levels (below 1.4 on the take-out bridge) Sugar Cr. is
		a mostly straightforward class II play run with dozens
		of anoying trees and willow jungles.  Boaters who see the
		creek at this level usually come away thinking, "what's the
		big deal - it's like a fast version of the Mulberry!"  But
		at around 2.0 on the take-out bridge gauge the creek leaves
		an entirely different impression.  At this level, rapids
		are often compared to drops on the Ocoee R. in Tennessee.  
		Holes become things to be avoided rather than surfed.  And
		the "annoying" trees become serious threats to life and limb.
		At high levels, really good boaters can find themselves 
		blown into, over, and under the myriad trees before they 
		can get stopped.  And there are also the man-made hazards:
		low water bridges and old cables hanging in the river.
		Luckily, the creek has an automatic system for warning
		boaters when they're about to get in over their heads:
		if you can't cross the low water bridges to make it to
		the put-in, you don't need to be paddling the creek!
		The description here is one of the creek at optimal
		levels: about 1.4 to 1.8 on the take-out bridge.  After
		a short pool, the first rapid is a good test for the run.
		It's a twisting class III-type drop with an undercut wall
		on the right at the bottom.  If you have trouble here,
		it's probably a good idea to just go load your boat on the
		car and go hiking!  This is followed by some nice surfing
		ledges and then another class III drop which pushes hard
		into a big rock on the left.  More surfing between short 
		pools can be had for while before the current picks up
		and pushes into a long, class III+ drop.  This one
		is always memorable - for the safest ride stay generally
		left, avoid the holes and pours and then paddle really
		hard into the final hydraulic!  If you've made it this far
		and are having fun, you should be in good shape.  If not,
		the road stays very near the creek for almost the enitre
		run, so walking out is always an option.  Eventually you'll
		pass a small cabin on the left in a big pool.  At the end of
		the pool, take the right chute, but watch out for trees -
		it's very narrow.  After this, you'll have a few holes
		and a lot of short, tree-choked spots to navigate.  After
		a few of these, you'll come to where you've hopefully marked
		the eddy upstream of the low water bridge.  In 2003 the
		eddy on river right was marked with yellow paint on a tree,
		but make sure this marking is visible before running
		down to the bridge!  If you don't get stopped in this eddy 
		you're likely to run past some bushes and find yourself
		heading for the bridge with little hope of stopping.  If you
		go too far, try to fight through the brush on the river
		left side just above the bridge and hit the small eddy
		there.  People have pinned under this bridge and very nearly
		drowned - take it VERY seriously!  After you portage the
		bridge, you'll be in the middle section of the creek.
		Lots of fast class II+ action with lots of trees.  When you 
		are comming down a shallow, open drop into a pool with a 
		nice big sitting rock in front of you, watch out for
		a cable that hangs into the river!  After this pool you'll
		go through some more rapids with loads of trees (as always) 
		and there are two more cables.  Portage these if they're in 
		the creek and if you can get stopped in time.  Several
		folks have taken a cable in the chest when they haven't
		stopped - be very careful!  Pretty soon you'll see Knoppers
		Ford Campground on your right - get out above the bridge on
		the right and portage it.  Now you're on the bottom section
		of the run - flatter water in general with one very notable
		exception.  When you find yourself having to dodge trees
		and run over ledgy shoals at the same time (weird) get 
		ready!  When you see a horizon line comming, eddy out
		on the right and you can scout the big drop from your
		boat.  The hole usually isn't too bad (except at flood
		levels) but the drop is powerful and rocky.  Good luck!
		If the water's extremely high, be careful not to paddle
		into the bridge at Jack Cr. Rec. Area, about 1/2 mile
		downstream from the big ledge.  Otherwise you can paddle
		under it and take out at the recreation area.  If you
		paddle Sugar Cr. at low levels, you're going to think
		the creek is overrated.  If you hit it with enough
		water, you're likely to think this description is quite
		conservative!  I've glossed over many bad willow jungles,
		long rapids, and potentially nasty holes.  Just make sure
		you would feel confident running the Esses on the Cossatot
		with a bunch of trees in it, and you'll probably have 
		fun on Sugar Cr. at optimum to high water.  Or wait for the 
		creek to drop, and you'll find a creek where an experienced
		class II boater will have a good time.  Because of the dozens 
		of trees and man-made hazards, it's always best to paddle 
		Sugar with someone who knows the creek well.

See the Photo Gallery for photos.

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Upper Upper Shoal Cr.

	Rating: III+ *
	TDCR: 6676
	Location: Put in via old logging road (now a horse trail) on east side 
		near top of Mt. Magazine. Turn right off of the state highway onto 
		a logging road in the middle of the first big "U" turn coming down 
		the north side from top of mountain. Turn right at the next 
		intersection and head for the creek. On a map, the put-in 
		is about 1/4 mile directly (as the crow flies) east of the 
		new state park visitor center.  Take out is at regular Shoal 
		Creek put in.
	Topo Quad(s): N/A
	Gradient: ? fpm
	Length: N/A
	Season: FLOOD
	Gauge: Run only when its almost too high at the normal Shoal Cr.
		put-in.  A whole lot of rain is needed!
	Hazards: Absolutely no eddies till near the bottom of the
		run... extremely fast, extremely narrow, hi-banked V shaped
		sides of river (nearly a slot in some areas) and very
		technical. You'll find yourself purposefully sliding over
		rocks to slow yourself down enough to have good control. 
	Description: Date of first descent was 1979, in open boats, 16 ft blue
		hole OCA's, by Fred Baker (Fort Smith), John Williams
		(Booneville), Jim Gardner (Van Buren). The whole stretch was
		nicknamed "The Shoal Sluice" by the first descent group.
		Only runnable once or twice a year at maximum, when other
		rivers and creeks are in flood.  Thanks go to Fred Baker
		for information on Upper Upper Shoal Cr.

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Last Update: 4/2005

Updates by Bill Herring


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